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Friday, April 10 • 3:40pm - 5:05pm
FR3.40.01 The End of “Public” Housing? Policy Frameworks and Implementation on HUD’s 50th Anniversary

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Federal housing policies under the Obama Administration espouse the value and necessity of private and third sector actors in the production and preservation of affordable housing. The FY 2010-2015 HUD Strategic Plan included a new mission statement to “create strong, sustainable, inclusive communities and quality, affordable homes for all” with five specific goals intended to guide the both the transformation of HUD as an agency, as well as the revitalization of communities. This plan describes the evolution of HUD from a large, centralized government bureaucracy to a customer-center organization that uses “The New Business Model” of data-driven performance. What do HUD’s past policy implementation processes demonstrate about public-private governance arrangements? How are the inherited HUD policies (such as HOPE VI) faring in particular cities and neighborhoods, and for particular special populations of tenants? And, what do we make of the past five years of HUD’s new policies, such as the Choice Neighborhood Initiative and the Rental Assistance Demonstration program, that require leveraging private actors and funding to maintain and redevelop public and assisted housing stock? This panel weaves HUD policy implementation for particular places and populations with the next iteration of HUD’s policy framework in order to show the continued evolution of policy design and implementation, calling into question the future of public housing.


Temporary Housing and Permanent Homes? Determinants of Spells in Public Housing
Prentiss Dantzler, Department of Public Policy & Administration, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

Housing the Poorest in San Francisco: Resisting Gentrification
Lawrence J. Vale, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,Department of Urban Studies and Planning

Revealing the Wizards Behind the Curtain: Influence of the Feds, Courts, and Mayors in Chicago’s Public Housing Policy Reforms
Amy Khare, University of Chicago

RADical Departure? A First Look at HUD's Rental Assistance Demonstration Program
James Hanlon, Southern Illinois University

Early Successes and Challenges in Choice Neighborhoods
Leah Hendey, Urban Institute; Rolf Pendall, Urban Institute; David Greenberg, MDRC; Kathryn Pettit, Urban Institute; Diane Levy, Urban Institute; Megan Gallagher, Urban Institute; Mark Joseph, Case Western Reserve University

Presenters
PD

Prentiss Dantzler

Fellow / Visiting Assistant Professor, Colorado College
avatar for James Hanlon

James Hanlon

Associate Professor, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
Assistant Professor of Geography. Research interests in urban geography, public and affordable housing, urban policy, and racial segregation and inequality.
avatar for Leah Hendey

Leah Hendey

Senior Research Associate, Urban Institute
avatar for Amy Khare

Amy Khare

Ph.D. Candidate, University of Chicago
Amy Khare’s research seeks to shape solutions to persistent poverty and structural inequality, with a specific focus on affordable housing, community development, and market-driven policies. Her central line of inquiry examines how urban politics influences the privatization of public resources in a restructured U.S. welfare state. She aims to produce scholarship that is guided by and has implications for local activism and policy changes... Read More →
avatar for Lawrence J. Vale

Lawrence J. Vale

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Moderators
avatar for Amy Khare

Amy Khare

Ph.D. Candidate, University of Chicago
Amy Khare’s research seeks to shape solutions to persistent poverty and structural inequality, with a specific focus on affordable housing, community development, and market-driven policies. Her central line of inquiry examines how urban politics influences the privatization of public resources in a restructured U.S. welfare state. She aims to produce scholarship that is guided by and has implications for local activism and policy changes... Read More →

Friday April 10, 2015 3:40pm - 5:05pm
Balmoral (2nd floor)