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Friday, April 10 • 8:05am - 9:30am
FR8.05.07 U.S. Education Policy Confronts Community and Educator Opposition: Activism and Scholarship

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This panel proposal is intended as part of the Activism Track. National education change in the U.S. has marginalized community and educator voices through increasing dependence on standardized metrics, market logics, philanthropic funding, and governance with limited democratic accountability. Significant resistance has developed on a variety of issues, including: school closures, barriers to teacher diversity, standardized testing, state take-overs, teachers unions, and agendas that prioritize private interests. In the first paper, Barbara Ferman describes the corporate reform agenda, resistance to it, and the challenges facing organizers of these opposition movements. Kimberly Mayfield Lynch discusses teacher diversity as an issue that has educational, community building, and economic significance and provides the details of a successful teacher diversity program won by community initiative. In the third paper, Ryan M. Good tells the stories of community responses in three Philadelphia neighborhoods after their local public schools were threatened with closure. William F. Ellis details the racially inequitable U.S. policies that prevent urban schools from creating a diverse and effective teaching force. He contextualizes these policies within a critical race theory framework, and then defines the steps needed by academics and activists to break down the barriers. In the final paper, Kitty Kelly Epstein uses insights from critical economics and critical race theory to explain why policies that have not “worked” are still being pursued. She looks at the impact of permanent racism and the lack of interest convergence on national and local movements for egalitarian change and concludes with a prediction.


David & Goliath: Challenges, Policy Windows, and Slingshots in the Corporate Reform Landscape
Barbara Ferman, Temple University; Nicholas Palazzolo, Temple University

Achieving Teacher Diversity: Teach Tomorrow in Oakland
Kimberly Mayfield-Lynch, Holy Names University; Rachelle Rogers-Ard, Teach Tomorrow in Oakland

Invoking landscapes of inequality: Race, class, and place in Philadelphia’s school closure debate
Ryan Good, Rutgers University

Breaking the Barriers to a Diverse Teaching Force
William (Fred) Ellis, Holy Names University

Commodified, Racially Inequitable Education Policy Examined through the Insights of Critical Race Theory and Critical Economic Theory
Kitty Kelly Epstein, Education Today/HNU/Fielding

Presenters
avatar for William (Fred) Ellis

William (Fred) Ellis

Holy Names University
Dr. Ellis was born the second son to a family enmeshed in the U.S. share-cropping system in an agricultural region of Georgia. He graduated from one of the most prestigious of Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Morehouse College, and participated in the Southern Civil Rights Movement. He became an educator and taught in the San Francisco School District. He organized one of the most successful programs in the U.S. to diversify the... Read More →
avatar for Kitty Kelly Epstein

Kitty Kelly Epstein

Professor, Holy Names University and Fielding Graduate University
In 2013 Kitty Kelly Epstein was honored with the Activist Scholar Award at the national conference of the Urban Affairs Association.  This was based on her work in Oakland, California where she led an innovation in democracy that consisted of 41 groups comprised of 800 people whose recommendations helped to change public policy on land use; the hiring of local residents on city-funded construction projects; the diversification of the teaching... Read More →
avatar for Barbara Ferman

Barbara Ferman

Professor, Temple University
Born and raised in Brooklyn (which is still the 4th largest city!), I had an early education about urban areas that was shaped by some very practical activities – turning empty lots into playgrounds, keeping the hand ball court for hours, dodging traffic, and learning the subway lines. Over the years, this practical education morphed into a concern with issues of housing and community development, neighborhood politics and community... Read More →
avatar for Ryan M. Good

Ryan M. Good

Doctoral student, Rutgers University
I am a doctoral candidate in Planning and Public Policy at the Bloustein School at Rutgers University. My interests lie in the areas of community development, place-based organizations, and the politics of neighborhood identity. In my dissertation, I am studying how local stakeholders invoked place-rooted arguments in contesting the proposed closure of Philadelphia public schools in 2013. My research explores the politics and the construction... Read More →
avatar for Kimberly Mayfield Lynch

Kimberly Mayfield Lynch

Holy Names University
Kimberly Mayfield is an Associate Professor and Chair of the Education Department at Holy Names University. She received her doctorate in Learning and Instruction from the University of San Francisco. Her research interests and activism include creating a permanent diverse teaching force, and the disproportionate over-representation of African American males in special education. From 2006-2011, Dr. Mayfield served as a co-convener of the... Read More →

Moderators
avatar for Kitty Kelly Epstein

Kitty Kelly Epstein

Professor, Holy Names University and Fielding Graduate University
In 2013 Kitty Kelly Epstein was honored with the Activist Scholar Award at the national conference of the Urban Affairs Association.  This was based on her work in Oakland, California where she led an innovation in democracy that consisted of 41 groups comprised of 800 people whose recommendations helped to change public policy on land use; the hiring of local residents on city-funded construction projects; the diversification of the teaching... Read More →

Friday April 10, 2015 8:05am - 9:30am
Star Isle (lobby level)