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Thursday, April 9 • 3:15pm - 4:40pm
TH3.15.16 The Neoliberal Neighborhood: New Political Landscapes in Detroit and Beyond

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Increasing attention is being paid to the ways black and brown communities are adapting to the fiscal crisis facing Rust Belt cities. A growing number of scholars argue that in the absence of adequate public goods, services, and amenities, residents in cities like Detroit have stepped up to take back neglected spaces and do the work in new ways. Yet while these more informal modes of insurgent citizenship may offer promise for residents struggling to maintain neglected neighborhoods, they pose a new set of problems and require increasing amounts of leverage in the increasingly bitter battles for valuable urban land, jobs, and resources. This panel pauses to reconsider the changing political landscape of the neoliberal city as well as the political choices available to its inhabitants. The four cases examined here complicate the idea that volunteer labor and grassroots activism will fill the void in governance left in the wake of urban austerity and broken democratic structures. As everyday people step up to enforce nondiscrimination policy and code violations, organize crime patrols, or fight the acquisition of land for large-scale redevelopment projects, the survival of urban neighborhoods may rest not on the willingness of residents to participate, but on who is funded to do so and what options the state has put forth to begin with.


Raise Money, Raise Hell, or Leave: The High Cost of Negative Freedoms in a Black Working Class Neighborhood
Jackson Christopher Bartlett, Northwestern University

Deciding to Build or Burn Bridges: Strategic Goal-Setting within an Environmental Sacrifice Zone
Amy Krings, University of Michigan; Sian Olson Dowis, Northwestern University

This is Not What We Do: Community Development at the Intersection of Neoliberalism, Policy Foreclosure, and Bureaucratic Governance
Brian Sargent, Northwestern University

City Auction: Municipal Response to Fiscal Distress in Detroit
Meghan Wilson, Brown University

Presenters
avatar for Jackson Christopher Bartlett

Jackson Christopher Bartlett

Doctoral Student, Northwestern University
My research is guided by the question of the ongoing significance of race in the neoliberal restructuring of US cities. More specifically, this paper deals with the individualization of responsibility for neighborhood systems, an individualization that reflects broader shifts in urban governance whereby responsibility is passed down to the neighborhood or block level and democratic systems are eroded and pass authority up to centralized... Read More →
SO

Sian Olson Dowis

Northwestern University
BS

Brian Sargent

Northwestern University
MW

Meghan Wilson

Brown University

Moderators
avatar for Jackson Christopher Bartlett

Jackson Christopher Bartlett

Doctoral Student, Northwestern University
My research is guided by the question of the ongoing significance of race in the neoliberal restructuring of US cities. More specifically, this paper deals with the individualization of responsibility for neighborhood systems, an individualization that reflects broader shifts in urban governance whereby responsibility is passed down to the neighborhood or block level and democratic systems are eroded and pass authority up to centralized... Read More →

Thursday April 9, 2015 3:15pm - 4:40pm
Michelangelo (2nd floor)