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Friday, April 10 • 9:50am - 10:30am
PS10.0 Urban change and housing in Germany

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Since the fall of the Berlin wall in 1989, Germany has experienced social, political, and economic changes that have impacted the urban environments and the housing landscape. While Germany has one of the lowest homeownership rates in Europe (ca. 40%), and its housing system is often regarded as the most affordable and liberal in Europe, its urban areas face problems that are in some ways similar to the US, for instance gentrification and homelessness on one hand, as well as progressive initiatives such as environmentally sustainable housing on the other. This research uses primary and secondary data, including photography, observation, documents, and population demographic data to examine 3 major cities in Germany – Berlin, Hamburg, and Kӧln – with particular emphasis on: • the history of German housing policy and its effect on urbanization and suburbanization, • topics such as gentrification, homelessness, and environmentally sustainable housing development, • the role of urban planning and regional development, • the role of arts and culture, • the effects of population/demographic change, • the role of government in achieving stable and affordable housing in spite of the global recession and global economic pressure. Lessons learned from this exploration of German urban change, urban planning, and culture in general have currency for the U.S., especially given its chronic affordable housing crisis and urban problems.

Presenters
avatar for Natasha Tursi

Natasha Tursi

Associate Director, Center for Urban Research and Education, Rutgers University


Friday April 10, 2015 9:50am - 10:30am
Biscayne Ballroom (2nd floor)