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Wednesday, April 8
 

7:00am

Wednesday - Registration (7:00am-7:00pm)
Express Conference Registration
Tours, Tickets and On-Site Registration

Wednesday April 8, 2015 7:00am - 7:00pm
Chopin Ballroom (2nd floor)

8:00am

Wednesday - Graduate Student Workshops (Special badge required for entry.)
A detailed schedule of the workshops and a link to the application form are available on the UAA web site:
http://tinyurl.com/mndd4zt

The deadline to apply for the 2015 Graduate Student Workshops has passed. Late applications are not accepted.
NOTE: Only students who applied for the workshops on/before December 2, 2014 AND whose applications were accepted will be able to participate in this workshop series.
  
Overview of Workshops

The Urban Affairs Association (UAA) is committed to promoting the professional growth and success of persons engaged in urban research. Historically, the UAA annual spring conference has offered short discussion roundtables that focus on professional development topics. In recent years, we have been pleased to jointly sponsor a full-day of professional development workshops with Routledge Publications. Student feedback has been overwhelmingly positive. The 2015 workshops are once again designed to equip students with a variety of academic and professional insights that are beneficial to research, teaching and/or policy-related careers. Participants leave with a digital resource packet that includes faculty presentations, links to valuable materials, and biographies of all participants in order to continue networking throughout the conference.

Wednesday April 8, 2015 8:00am - 4:45pm
Balmoral/Sandringham (2nd floor)

11:30am

12:45pm

Tour 1: Wynwood/Midtown Miami (SOLD OUT)
>>>>>SOLD OUT<<<<<

Registering for Tours

A limited number of tours, designed for urban researchers, are available during the Conference. Conference attendees can register for tours in advance via the online registration form or in-person at the conference  registration office located on the 2nd floor of the InterContinental Hotel in the Chopin Ballroom.  Tours have limited space.  So if you are interested, it is wise to register and pay your tour fees as soon as possible.  Our most popular tours will likely become full by early January.
ALL tours begin at 1:00pm. Tour participants will meet in the hotel lobby at 12:45pm before departure. 

Tour 1: Wynwood/Midtown Miami
Wednesday, April 8 – 1:00pm-5:00pm
Price: $28
Capacity: TBD

Tour organizer: Dr. Jean-Claude Garcia-Zamor.
Tour leader: Dr. Ned Murray, AICP, Florida International University Metropolitan Center.

The tour will highlight the transformation of Miami’s Wynwood Neighborhood from a garment manufacturing community to a neighborhood with adjoining districts comprised of a diverse mix of high-rise condos, industrial chic lofts and a booming arts scene. The Wynwood Arts District has experienced a renaissance due to recent and rapid cultural development. Thousands of local and international guests visit the Wynwood Arts District during the world renowned Art Basel festivities. The largest and most recent transformation of Wynwood occurred with the development of “Midtown Miami” in 2004. Midtown Miami was the largest urban development infill project in the United States at that time. The success of Midtown Miami’s commercial development greatly impacted real estate values and the subsequent gentrification of Wynwood. Today it is home to over 70 art galleries, retail stores, antique shops, eclectic bars, and one of the largest open-air street-art installations in the world. Wynwood’s graffiti propelled a forgotten industrial swath of Miami into one of the most coveted tracts of real estate in America. The tour will begin in Wynwood’s Fashion District which is now principally operated by South Korean businesses and remains very vibrant. The tour will continue through Wynwood’s residential neighborhoods where housing prices have greatly escalated in the past ten years. It will then proceed by foot through Wynwood’s Arts District with a stop at the “Windwood Walls,” an enclosed park where wall graffitis by Miami and international artists are preserved. Finally, the tour will end with a walk through Midtown Miami.

Wednesday April 8, 2015 12:45pm - 5:00pm
Intercontinental Hotel (meet in lobby at 12:45pm)

1:00pm

Wednesday - Workshop on Urban Education Policy Advocacy (Application required for participation)
Interested? Please Apply for the Workshop
There is no fee for this workshop. We do however require that each participant complete a brief application form. This form will allow us to plan for the size of the group and determine our space needs. Please fill out this brief interest form so that you can be added to our contact list. The application deadline is February 23, 2015.

Questions? Please contact Barbara Ferman (bferman@temple.edu)

Summary

There is an emerging consensus among policy scholars, advocates, and policy makers, that education has become the civil rights issue for the 21st Century. Competing views of “rights” have created a divided landscape of policy reform. Growing inequities in funding across school districts, increases in the opportunity gap across racial lines, contested definitions of what constitutes “quality education,” and fervent debates over the “corporatization” of public education have inspired significant advocacy efforts in many larger urban areas. Paralleling these progressive efforts, but rarely intersecting them, are scholarly investigations of a myriad of issues in education. This workshop represents an attempt to bridge that chasm. It poses the overall question of how we, as researchers, can contribute work that supports a larger agenda of educational equity. Specifically, we are seeking researchers whose work addresses the following areas:


  • school financing (how money is spent on various educational agendas such as vouchers, test preparation business; standardized test administration; state take-over administration and the like);

  • composition of the teaching body (what does it look like and how can we diversify it to reflect the student population in public schools, changes in the preparation/experience base of the teaching labor force);

  • standardized testing (its impact on teaching and learning; pedagogy and issues surrounding the common core);

  • education policy and urban inequality

  • market-based reforms (e.g., vouchers, charter schools, teacher accountability policies)


Through this workshop we hope to bring together scholar activists who are conducting or want to conduct research in one of the areas listed above and related areas. Participants will briefly discuss their research, identify others who are conducting similar research with whom we can network, explore ways to support and collaborate with activists and identify venues for disseminating the work in ways that reach audiences beyond the academy. In addition, the workshop discussants will describe strategies for navigating the academic tenure/promotion system while engaging in policy advocacy and direct engagement outside of the academy.

Presenters
avatar for William (Fred) Ellis

William (Fred) Ellis

Holy Names University
Dr. Ellis was born the second son to a family enmeshed in the U.S. share-cropping system in an agricultural region of Georgia. He graduated from one of the most prestigious of Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Morehouse College, and participated in the Southern Civil Rights Movement. He became an educator and taught in the San Francisco School District. He organized one of the most successful programs in the U.S. to diversify the... Read More →
avatar for Kitty Kelly Epstein

Kitty Kelly Epstein

Professor, Holy Names University and Fielding Graduate University
In 2013 Kitty Kelly Epstein was honored with the Activist Scholar Award at the national conference of the Urban Affairs Association.  This was based on her work in Oakland, California where she led an innovation in democracy that consisted of 41 groups comprised of 800 people whose recommendations helped to change public policy on land use; the hiring of local residents on city-funded construction projects; the diversification of the teaching... Read More →
avatar for Barbara Ferman

Barbara Ferman

Professor, Temple University
Born and raised in Brooklyn (which is still the 4th largest city!), I had an early education about urban areas that was shaped by some very practical activities – turning empty lots into playgrounds, keeping the hand ball court for hours, dodging traffic, and learning the subway lines. Over the years, this practical education morphed into a concern with issues of housing and community development, neighborhood politics and community... Read More →
avatar for Kimberly Mayfield Lynch

Kimberly Mayfield Lynch

Holy Names University
Kimberly Mayfield is an Associate Professor and Chair of the Education Department at Holy Names University. She received her doctorate in Learning and Instruction from the University of San Francisco. Her research interests and activism include creating a permanent diverse teaching force, and the disproportionate over-representation of African American males in special education. From 2006-2011, Dr. Mayfield served as a co-convener of the... Read More →
avatar for Julia Sass Rubin

Julia Sass Rubin

Associate Professor, Rutgers University
Julia Sass Rubin, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor at the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy at Rutgers University and an Associate Visiting Professor at the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University. She also is one of the founding members of Save Our Schools NJ, a nonpartisan, grassroots organization of more than 29,000 parents and other concerned residents who believe that all New Jersey children should have access... Read More →


Wednesday April 8, 2015 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Raphael/Michelangelo (2nd floor)

4:00pm

4:30pm

6:30pm

 
Thursday, April 9
 

7:00am

7:00am

7:00am

Thursday - Registration (7:00am-6:00pm)
Express Conference Registration
Tours, Tickets and On-Site Registration

Thursday April 9, 2015 7:00am - 6:00pm
Chopin Ballroom (2nd floor)

7:15am

TH7.00.02 Lessons from the Demise of Hull House: Neighborhood/Community Centers At-Risk
On January 27, 2012, Jane Adams iconic Hull House and settlement house flagship sank amidst a sea of mounting financial obligations and lack of community lifeboats to sustain its massive programs and professional crew. Going down with this legendary vessel were thousands of social service passengers who depended on it. The historic Hull House museum remains at the University of Illinois at Chicago. bit after 123 years its mission sunk too deeply to recover. Historian, Louise Knight, contends that the Hull House of today became a “an example of settlement house as government provider” (2012) having abandoned its community activist roots (Knight, 2005; 2010) to be a government dependent social service agency unable to recover from ongoing public cutbacks. She and others caution on the limits of government funding and drifting from the “grassroots” of the settlement house movement. In Settlement Houses Under Siege Fabricant and Fisher (2002) noted that settlement houses weakened by dependence on public funding and waning volunteerism and citizen participation, settlement hallmarks replaced by reliance on professionalized social services. This roundtable dialogue will focus on whether Hull House’s demise is a harbinger for other community centers on the frontlines of helping distressed urban areas. The Hull House situation underscores: • Connections of community centers to their communities and constituencies – the roots of the settlement house movement • Over-reliance on Government funding and the limitation of fund-raising with economically distressed communities and constituents • Inability to engage and mobilize grassroots, poor, and disenfranchised constituencies • waning focus in professional education on community organizing and advocacy and lobbying This roundtable hopes to generate other issues, as well as a dialogue among those interested in studying and supporting grassroots and community-based organizations and neighborhood centers.

Presenters
TM

Tracy M. Soska

University of Pittsburgh


Thursday April 9, 2015 7:15am - 8:00am
Grand Ballroom (2nd floor)

7:15am

TH7.00.03 Creating Livable Communities: Academic Perspectives
This breakfast roundtable will present perspectives from a group of academics from across the US on the topic of creating livable, healthy and sustainable communities. The development of such communities is becoming an important part of community development, urban design, policy planning and urban affairs. With the desire by urban scholars throughout N. America and Europe to move from communities that are often described as sterile and boring places to live, it is important to understand the factors that make communities livable. This roundtable will discuss what has gone wrong in many communities and will offer suggestions for making them more livable.

Presenters
RC

Roger Caves

San Diego State University
CG

Cecilia Giusti

Texas A&M University
avatar for Ji Hei Lee

Ji Hei Lee

Lecturer, Texas A&M University
FW

Fritz Wagner

University of Washington


Thursday April 9, 2015 7:15am - 8:00am
Grand Ballroom (2nd floor)

7:15am

TH7.00.04 Housing Education: HUD Higher Education Initiative
The purpose of this roundtable is to discuss Tennessee State University (TSU)’s initiative to affirmatively support U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)’s strategic fair housing policy goals and provide paths to fair housing careers through the TSU Urban Studies curriculum. The discussion leaders are the investigators for a HUD grant supporting this initiative. This grant funds the first initiative of this type and its outcomes will be tracked over a number of years to identify successful strategies for (1) embedding fair housing education into higher education programs to educate future fair housing professionals; (2) providing multiple learning experiences that promote professional interests in housing and prepare graduates for fair housing-related careers; and (3) enhancing fair housing education through community collaboration.

Presenters
JG

Joan Gibran

Tennessee State University, Department of Urban Studies
KT

Kimberly Triplett

Tennessee State University


Thursday April 9, 2015 7:15am - 8:00am
Grand Ballroom (2nd floor)

7:15am

TH7.00.05 Let's Talk About Food!
Obesity and Type II diabetes have repeatedly been linked to poor food access and the situation demands that we look at food through a better lens. Public interest in healthful urban food environments is rising fast and scholars across many disciplines are increasingly looking at the relationships between health, food security and sustainability. Community food systems are neither the domain of urban planners, nor community developers and organizers. Nor can they be left to the designs of food purveyors and food service professionals. They belong to “every profession which has a food-related interest, as well as NGO’s that focus on social justice, public health, food security and ecological causes” (Morgan, 2009, p. 342). In short, they belong to the community itself. Over the past decade more than 100 cities across N. America have developed or are developing strategic plans towards more equitable and sustainable food systems under the banner-goal of community food security. The community food assessment (CFA) is community-based participatory research (CBPR) at its best. The process brings together stakeholders from all parts of the urban food spectrum in research, debate and planning exercises that identify and fill gaps in the flow of good-quality food. CFA’s are stimulating the creation of food policy councils, community gardens, community-supported agriculture (CSA), farmers markets, nutrition-education initiatives as well as NGO outreach programs in support of government food assistance standards such as SNAP, WIC and school-based food programs. The moderator of this roundtable will initiate a discussion on urban food systems by introducing findings from his ongoing review of community food assessments (CFA’s). Participants will be encouraged to share what is happening with food in their own communities in order to generate a lively exchange of ideas.

Presenters
avatar for John Buschman

John Buschman

Adjunct Instructor-Hospitality Mgt. & Ph.D. Student-Social Welfare, Florida International University
Food security issues, community food security, corporate social responsibility, social work, hospitality and tourism industries.


Thursday April 9, 2015 7:15am - 8:00am
Grand Ballroom (2nd floor)

7:15am

TH7.00.06 Actual Urban Challenges Veterans Face which Limit Successful Transition into Civilian Lives
This session will focus on the actual urban challenges Veterans face which limit successful transition into civilian lives. Veteran specific issues include but are not limited to Unemployment; Lack of Translation of Military Knowledge, Training, and Skills into Civilian Employment; Reintegration into Society; Homelessness; PTSD; Mental Health and Substance Abuse Disorders; and other limiting factors that compromise successful transition into civilian life. Speakers will draw on insights from their contributions to a Veteran Administration Nursing Academic Partnership (VANAP), their work on Veteran specific healthcare issues, Veteran issues related to separation from military service among other contributions each has made to the Veteran community. Comments will include Veteran outcomes and interprofessional solutions. Speakers will reflect on best practices related particularly to employability and training that builds on knowledge and skills gained in the military (i.e.: university accelerated programs for Veterans where they get credit for military education and training such as the Veteran Bachelor of Science in Nursing at Florida International University; Military Police to Criminal Justice, Navigational Experience and Knowledge to Geology, Geography, etc), employment post military separation, reintegration into society,  Veteran demographics, homelessness prevention and other mental health and substance abuse disorders that limit Veteran successful transition into urban civilian and family life.

Presenters
D

Deborah Clarke

Miami VA Healthcare System
avatar for Maria Olenick

Maria Olenick

Chair of Undergraduate Nursing, Florida International University
Maria Olenick PhD, FNP, RN is Chair of Undergraduate Nursing at the Nicole Wertheim College of Nursing and Health Sciences (NWCNHS) at Florida International University (FIU), Miami, FL. Before joining Florida International University (FIU), she was Director of Clinical Skills and Simulation at a new allopathic medical school in Northeast Pennsylvania. She received her PhD in 2012 from Widener University. She received her MS and FNP... Read More →


Thursday April 9, 2015 7:15am - 8:00am
Grand Ballroom (2nd floor)

7:15am

TH7.00.01 Identifying UAA Member Concerns: Listening session with the UAA Staff and Membership Committee
Hosted by the UAA Membership Committee This breakfast roundtable is organized to facilitate an open discussion between UAA members, UAA staff and the UAA membership committee to identify member concerns and obtain suggestions for the direction of the organization. Conveners will also discuss ways members can increase their involvement in UAA. Conveners Margaret Wilder UAA Executive Director Marla Nelson UAA Membership Committee

Presenters
avatar for john doe

john doe

Executive Director, Urban Affairs Association
Ph.D. in Urban Geography and Urban Planning (University of Michigan); M.A. and B.A. degrees from University of Texas-Arlington. Began faculty career at Indiana University, attained tenure as faculty member at Cornell, served as a department chair at SUNY-Albany and graduate program director and full professor at University of Delaware. Recipient of Best Paper awards from UAA and American Planning Association. Chair of UAA Governing Board... Read More →
MN

Marla Nelson

University of New Orleans


Thursday April 9, 2015 7:15am - 8:00am
Grand Ballroom (2nd floor)

8:05am

9:15am

TH9.15.05 Emerging Issues in Urban Planning: Ethno-Racial Intersections
As urbanization patterns are rapidly transforming the world, the planning field is struggling to develop new intellectual and technical tools to both interpret and act in effective and equitable ways. This colloquy will explore the linkages between public health, migration, social justice, and labor in cities through the lens of ethno-racial dynamics. Urban epidemics of obesity and diabetes have prompted a renewed interest in the linkages of planning and public health in underrepresented communities. Spatial and residential segregation and class inequity places increasing burdens on native born minority and immigrant groups. As our cities become more diverse, even scholars of race and ethnicity grapple with the challenges of becoming more mindful of how national origin and other identity traits complicate societal systems of opportunity and discrimination. While some important ground has been advanced in each of these areas, much work remains to be done in order to excavate their intersections with race and ethnicity. This colloquy brings together reflective planning, public health, and migration scholars and practitioners to speak candidly about their own attempts to grapple with the need to bring race and/or ethnicity into their emerging planning work and scholarship.

Presenters
avatar for John Arroyo

John Arroyo

PhD Student, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
John Arroyo is an urban planner and migration scholar who is also a doctoral candidate and National Research Council/Ford Foundation Diversity Fellow at MIT’s Department of Urban Studies and Planning. His research interests include arts and cultural development, urban design policy, civic space, and racial and ethnic landscapes. He has over 15 years of urban planning and design experience working with various nonprofits, foundations, and... Read More →
DH

Diana Hernandez

Columbia University

Moderators
avatar for John Arroyo

John Arroyo

PhD Student, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
John Arroyo is an urban planner and migration scholar who is also a doctoral candidate and National Research Council/Ford Foundation Diversity Fellow at MIT’s Department of Urban Studies and Planning. His research interests include arts and cultural development, urban design policy, civic space, and racial and ethnic landscapes. He has over 15 years of urban planning and design experience working with various nonprofits, foundations, and... Read More →

Thursday April 9, 2015 9:15am - 10:40am
Escorial (2nd floor)

9:15am

TH9.15.11 Governing on the Edge: Cities, Climate Change, and the Polycentric-Global Governance Tension
Some scholars argue that the complexity of climate change, and the justice and power issues of local communities affected by climate change, require polycentric governance. Others suggest that the sheer magnitude of the causes and effects of climate change require global governance. However, the tension between favoring polycentric or global governance rests on an exaggerated dichotomy. Cities and urban communities can often serve as nodes in networks of multiscalar global change and multiscalar governance systems for addressing climate change. One of the challenging issues concerning cities and multiscalar governance is determining who governs what: who gets to participate and in what ways, how is power allocated and mediated, and what kinds of governance systems or structures will best serve a multitude of ecological and social goals, including building the social-ecological resilience of metropolitan areas. Who decides will meaningfully impact what gets decided. Further, we must determine whether we have governance systems capable of coordination under such complexity and uncertainty, and if not, should we modify those structures or look beyond them? A group of interdisciplinary legal scholars will discuss how cities can address governance reform that transcends the need to address climate change both globally and locally.

Presenters
avatar for Tony Arnold

Tony Arnold

Boehl Chair in Property & Land Use, University of Louisville
MD

Myanna Dellinger

Professor of Law, Western State College of Law
National and international environmental affairs.
avatar for Kalyani Robbins

Kalyani Robbins

Associate Professor of Law, Florida International University

Moderators
avatar for Kalyani Robbins

Kalyani Robbins

Associate Professor of Law, Florida International University

Thursday April 9, 2015 9:15am - 10:40am
Crandon (lobby level)

9:15am

TH9.15.01 Informal Urbanism in North America (PART 1, Proposal for a two-panel session)
Informality in the Global North is receiving increasing attention. Urban informality has a long, forgotten history in these countries, including street vending and urban homesteading in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The resurgence of informal urbanism reflects the increasing precariousness of everyday life. Economic instability and social inequality fueled migration, day laboring, and sidewalk vending. Falling wages, economic restructuring, and rising living costs increased contingent work, homelessness, and informal housing practices. Municipal financial distress also encouraged the devolution of collective governance. In some circumstances, informality carries a countercultural cache as when taco trucks, pop-up beer gardens, and guerilla gardening become urban marketing tools. In all cases, informality has stimulated local re-regulation as cities respond to simultaneous demands to stop informal activity and to permit food trucks, vacation rentals and other informal practices. This organized, two-panel session explores the informal landscapes emerging in U.S., Canadian, and German cities. The first panel explains key characteristics of informal urbanism. What is it? Who does it? Where and how does informality thrive, and why? This panel explores these questions using in-depth studies of housing, food vending, and other informal practices in Chicago, New Orleans, Phoenix, Calgary, and Berlin. The second panel explores how informal practices interact with collective organizing and re-regulation. How do regulatory responses alter informal practices, and how does collective action surrounding informality shape new patterns of opportunity and inequality? Panel participants explore these questions using studies of urban policy reforms in New Orleans, Detroit, New York, Portland, and Chicago by policy makers who are attempting to make jurisdictional space for some informal practices within “mainstream” governance structures.


Self organization and the new regulatory landscapes of street food vending in Chicago and New Orleans
Renia Ehrenfeucht, University of New Orleans

Secondary housing suites in Canada: an underground remedy for affordability and social mobility?
Gregory Morrow, University of Calgary; Maren Sears, University of Calgary

Informal Settlements in the U.S. and Abroad
Anthony Barnum, Dickinson College

The Informalization of Poverty and Everyday Resistance
Nabil Kamel, Western Washington University

Presenters
AB

Anthony Barnum

Dickinson College
RE

Renia Ehrenfeucht

University of New Orleans
NK

Nabil Kamel

Western Washington University
GM

Gregory Morrow

University of Calgary

Moderators
RE

Renia Ehrenfeucht

University of New Orleans

Thursday April 9, 2015 9:15am - 10:40am
Trinity (2nd floor)

9:15am

TH9.15.02 Low and Moderate Income Housing Issues in the City and Suburbs
Moderator: Adrienne Holloway, DePaul University

Low Income Housing Tax Credits in Older Suburbs: Evidence from Greater Philadelphia
Carolyn Adams, Temple University

Suburban Differentiation and the Geography of Housing Affordability
Whitney Airgood-Obrycki, The Ohio State University

Low Income Latinos in Suburbia: An examination of housing and social service safety net access in the Chicago Region.
Adrienne Holloway, DePaul University

Unending Foreclosure Crisis: Interactions between residential segregation and REO properties
Jeongseob Kim, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology

Homeownership Attitudes and Purchases During the Financial Crisis
Mark R. Lindblad, Univ. of North Carolina - Chapel Hill; Hye-sung Han, Univ. of North Carolina - Chapel Hill; William M. Rohe, Univ. of North Carolina - Chapel Hill

Presenters
CA

Carolyn Adams

Temple University
WA

Whitney Airgood-Obrycki

The Ohio State University
avatar for Adrienne Holloway

Adrienne Holloway

Assistant Professor, DePaul University
JK

Jeongseob Kim

Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology
ML

Mark Lindblad

UNC-Chapel Hill Center for Community Capital

Moderators
avatar for Adrienne Holloway

Adrienne Holloway

Assistant Professor, DePaul University

Thursday April 9, 2015 9:15am - 10:40am
Balmoral (2nd floor)

9:15am

TH9.15.03 Community Engagement in Research and Grassroots Action
Moderator: Davia Downey, Grand Valley State University

Participatory Action Research: Transitioning from service recipient to service provider
Tara Bengle, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

How Do Voluntary Neighborhood Associations Vary? A Study of Programmatic Activities and Economic Vitality in Grand Rapids, Michigan
Davia Downey, Grand Valley State University

Housing Redevelopment in a Small Urban Community: Engaging Youth Residents as Partners in the Planning Process
Miatta Echetebu, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Tracy D. Dace, Parkland College; Mark Aber, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Kevin Jackson, City of Champaign, IL

Neighborhood Attachment and Neighborhood Collective Action: Moving from the Collective to the Individal
R. Allen Hays, University of Northern Iowa

Freestyle Urbanism: Planning with Low-Income Youth and Urban Youth Cultures in New York City and Paris
Lilian Knorr, Princeton University

Presenters
TB

Tara Bengle

University of North Carolina at Charlotte
avatar for Davia Downey

Davia Downey

Assistant Professor, Grand Valley State University
ME

Miatta Echetebu

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
avatar for R. Allen Hays

R. Allen Hays

Director, Graduate Program in Public Policy, University of Northern Iowa
Housing, neighborhood organization and participation, anti-racism work, and social justice
LK

Lilian Knorr

Princeton University

Moderators
avatar for Davia Downey

Davia Downey

Assistant Professor, Grand Valley State University

Thursday April 9, 2015 9:15am - 10:40am
Windsor (2nd floor)

9:15am

TH9.15.04 Urban Blight, Gentrification and Redevelopment
Moderator: Michael Webb, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Entertaining Blight: Better Alternatives for a Vibrant Farish Street Historic District
Dwayne Baker, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign

Anchor Institutions and Neighborhood Revitalization Policy: The Use of Linked Development Agreements (DAs) and Community Benefit Agreements (CBAs) in Shrinking Cities
Molly Ranahan, SUNY University at Buffalo; Kelly Patterson, SUNY University at Buffalo; Li Yin, SUNY University at Buffalo; Robert Silverman, SUNY University at Buffalo

New ((Sub)Urban Dreams: A Case Study of Redevelopment in Upper Arlington, Ohio
Glennon Sweeney, Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity; Bernadette Hanlon, Ohio State University

Displacement, Revitalization, or Both? Neighborhood Characteristics of Section 8 residents in Charlotte, North Carolina, 2008-2014.
Michael Webb, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; William Rohe, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Kirstin Frescoln, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Staying Put in NYC: The Case of Stuyvesant Town
Rachael Woldoff, West Virginia University; Lisa Morrison, United Nations

Presenters
DB

Dwayne Baker

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
MR

Molly Ranahan

SUNY University at Buffalo
avatar for Glennon Sweeney

Glennon Sweeney

Research Associate, Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity at Ohio State University
Glennon is a research associate at the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity working in the Opportunity Communities Program on issues related to food security and access, poverty, civic engagement, and equity. Glennon holds a master’s in city and regional planning from Ohio State in addition to a bachelor’s degree in geography and political science from the university. Glennon is a member of the Franklin County Local Food... Read More →
avatar for Michael Webb

Michael Webb

Research Associate, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Neighborhood revitalization, gentrification, community economic development, urban governance
avatar for Rachael Woldoff

Rachael Woldoff

West Virginia University

Moderators
avatar for Michael Webb

Michael Webb

Research Associate, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Neighborhood revitalization, gentrification, community economic development, urban governance

Thursday April 9, 2015 9:15am - 10:40am
Sandringham (2nd floor)

9:15am

TH9.15.06 Jobs across space and over time: innovative applications of data from the Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics (LEHD) program
The four papers on this panel demonstrate innovative uses of data from the Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics (LEHD) program to investigate policy-relevant empirical issues relating to urban and metropolitan employment. LEHD is a partnership between the Center for Economic Studies at the U.S. Census Bureau and State governments. Under the Partnership, states agree to share Unemployment Insurance earnings data and the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) data with the Census Bureau. Combining these data with data from censuses and surveys, the program creates statistics on employment, earnings, and job flows at detailed levels of geography and industry and for different demographic groups (U.S. Census Bureau 2014). As the use of LEHD grows more common among scholars, this panel explores both the potential and the limitations of this dataset and reveals examples of how the data can be practically applied in policy settings. The papers in the session include comparative explorations of the spatial distribution of working poverty in different cities; the effect of post-Hurricane economic recovery on the nature and location of jobs in New Orleans, and the coping strategies low-income populations adopt in neighborhoods that are characterized by low-earning workers, low car ownership and geographical remoteness from jobs.


Wage Deserts: A Spatial Conceptualization of Working Poverty
Laura Wolf-Powers, CUNY Graduate Center; Josh Warner, University of Pennsylvania; Shiva Kooragayala, University of Pennsylvania

The Location, Prevalence and Dynamics of Wage Deserts in Three Cities
Josh Warner, University of Pennsylvania; Jessica Fisch, Georgia Institute of Technology; Katie Nelson, The Reinvestment Fund, Philadelphia, PA; Marla Nelson, University of New Orleans; Laura Wolf-Powers, CUNY Graduate Center

The geography of jobs in post-Hurricane Katrina New Orleans: mapping the recovery for low-wage workers
Marla Nelson, University of New Orleans; Jessica Fisch, Georgia Institute of Technology

Mobility strategies and employment in secondary metropolitan areas
Kate Lowe, University of New Orelans; Kimberly Mosby, University of New Orleans

Presenters
JF

Jessica Fisch

Georgia Institute of Technology
KL

Kate Lowe

University of New Orleans
JA

Joshua A. Warner

University of Pennsylvania
avatar for Laura Wolf-Powers

Laura Wolf-Powers

Research Fellow, University of Pennsylvania
I am excited to be presenting a paper called "From Food Deserts to Wage Deserts," which traces the metaphor of the food desert to its origins by drawing on the literature on policy mobility, or “concepts on the move" and which then draws on the Census Bureau’s Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics (LEHD) dataset to map a distinct geospatial portrait of economic deprivation. Talk to me about low-wage work, the conflicted logics... Read More →

Moderators
avatar for Laura Wolf-Powers

Laura Wolf-Powers

Research Fellow, University of Pennsylvania
I am excited to be presenting a paper called "From Food Deserts to Wage Deserts," which traces the metaphor of the food desert to its origins by drawing on the literature on policy mobility, or “concepts on the move" and which then draws on the Census Bureau’s Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics (LEHD) dataset to map a distinct geospatial portrait of economic deprivation. Talk to me about low-wage work, the conflicted logics... Read More →

Thursday April 9, 2015 9:15am - 10:40am
Marti (lobby level)

9:15am

TH9.15.07 Citizenship and Inequality in Urban Education Provision
Moderator: Brandi Blessett, Rutgers University - Camden

The Hypocrisy of Democracy: Students of color, school-to-prison pipeline, and second-class citizenship
Brandi Blessett, Rutgers University - Camden

Toward a Socio-Spatial Framework for Urban Mathematics Education
Gregory Larnell, University of Illinois at Chicago; Erika Bullock, University of Memphis

Urban Education, Foundations, and the Cleveland Urban League’s Street Academy Program, 1968-1975: Keeping Urban Schools Going Down the Up Staircase
Elizabeth Smith-Pryor, Kent State University

Presenters
avatar for Brandi Blessett

Brandi Blessett

Assistant Professor, Rutgers University - Camden
GL

Gregory Larnell

University of Illinois at Chicago
ES

Elizabeth Smith-Pryor

Kent State University

Moderators
avatar for Brandi Blessett

Brandi Blessett

Assistant Professor, Rutgers University - Camden

Thursday April 9, 2015 9:15am - 10:40am
Star Isle (lobby level)

9:15am

TH9.15.08 Religion, Identity and Community Action
Moderator: Gordana Rabrenovic, Northeastern University

Growth of Muslim Public Sphere in “Hispanicized” Miami
Mirsad Krijestorac, Florida International University

The Role of Civil Society Organizations in Strengthening Social Resiliency in Divided Cities
Gordana Rabrenovic, Northeastern University

The Role of Social Capital and Civil Society in Community and Economic Development
Barry Rubin (Indiana University), Trent Engbers (University of Southern Indiana), and Craig Aubuchon (Analysis Group, Boston)

Unpacking 'faith-based organizations' and 'faith-based community development'
Tonya Sanders, Morgan State University

Presenters
MK

Mirsad Krijestorac

Florida International University
GR

Gordana Rabrenovic

Northeastern University
BR

Barry Rubin

Professor of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University
TS

Tonya Sanders

Morgan State University

Moderators
GR

Gordana Rabrenovic

Northeastern University

Thursday April 9, 2015 9:15am - 10:40am
Palm Isle (lobby level)

9:15am

TH9.15.09 Preservation of Memory, Place Making and Local Belonging in Mexico City
In this panel, we will focus on some important urban projects that are involving the preservation and the revitalization of central areas and/or ancient poor neighborhoods. In recent decades, global process in Mexico City has deeply transformed local urban spaces in particular with the increase to tourism, housing construction, major building projects and infrastructure for transportation, culture, leisure and finance. These phenomena have generated an extraordinary urban growth, irreversible changes in local spaces and the operation of the city, producing powerful impacts on the lives and practices of the inhabitants in all dimensions of everyday life, from the local to the metropolitan experience. The implementation of these urban changes aims to promote a certain vision of the city and his identity. However, at the same time it entails a reduced amount of consensus or a clear opposition of the residents, who have a different vision about how the preservation (or the renewal) of their local urban environment should be. In others words, the new urban projects make evident the existence of different ideas about urban memory and urban identity, and the conflicts between them. Starting from different case studies, this panel aims to point out the complex dynamics of historic preservation of local memory in a metropolis with a vast diversity of memories, many contrasting identities associated with local space, and different form of creation and recreation of local space and local belonging. Our objective is to show how the preservation of urban memory and its concretion in urban space is in fact the result of a struggle between different social groups with different worldviews about the metropolis, his past and his future.


Social movement, territory and memory in “La Malinche” popular neighborhood (Mexico City)
Maria Ana Portal, UAM Iztapalapa

The “Nuevo Polanco” Urban Project in Central Mexico City
Adriana Aguayo, UAM Iztapalapa

Local Belonging and Identity. Spaces of Urban Assemblage in México City
Margarita Pérez Negrete, CIESAS Mexico

Preservation of memory and urban renewal: the Alameda Central Park
Angela Giglia, UAM Iztapalapa

Presenters
avatar for Adriana Aguayo

Adriana Aguayo

UAM Iztapalapa
avatar for Angela Giglia

Angela Giglia

Profesora-investigadora titular de tiempo completo, UAM Iztapalapa
Urban space, urban anthropology, urban precariat
MA

Maria Ana Portal

UAM Iztapalapa

Moderators
avatar for Angela Giglia

Angela Giglia

Profesora-investigadora titular de tiempo completo, UAM Iztapalapa
Urban space, urban anthropology, urban precariat

Thursday April 9, 2015 9:15am - 10:40am
Raphael (2nd floor)

9:15am

TH9.15.10 Urban Design Policy
Moderator: Sabina Deitrick, University of Pittsburgh

Park(ing) Cities: Trendy Green in the Global City
Helene Littke, Royal Institute of Technology Stockholm, Sweden

Urban Design Policies in New World Cities: Achieving Sustainable Development as Part of a Broader Planning Policy for Urban Intensification
Cesar Wagner, Senior Lecturer at UNIVATES (Brazil) & UNITEC (New Zealand); PhD candidate (Propur/UFRGS); Lúcia Camargos Melchiors, Lecturer at UNIVATES & UNIFIN (Brazil); Phd candidate (Propur/UFRGS); Architect DEMHAB/Gravataí

Presenters
HL

Helene Littke

Royal Institute of Technology Stockholm, Sweden
avatar for Cesar Wagner

Cesar Wagner

Senior Lecturer at UNIVATES (Brazil) & UNITEC (New Zealand), PhD candidate (Propur/UFRGS)
Cesar Wagner is an architect, urbanist and educator with professional experience from Brazil, Argentine, The Netherlands, United Kingdom and New Zealand. He completed his undergraduate studies in Brazil and Argentine, and, in 2002, earned his Masters degree in Housing and Urbanism at the Architectural Association School of Architecture, London, UK (Chevening Scholarship recipient - British Council). Currently he is a PhD candidate at the... Read More →

Moderators
avatar for Sabina Deitrick

Sabina Deitrick

University of Pittsburgh

Thursday April 9, 2015 9:15am - 10:40am
Hibiscus (lobby level)

9:15am

TH9.15.12 Developing sustainable mobility schemes for urban areas
Moderator: David King, Columbia University

Mototaxis as a component of multimodality and intermodality in Hanoi (Vietnam)
Blaise Bordeleau, Université de Montréal; Danielle Labbé, Université de Montréal

Taking Rides from Strangers: A Survey of Jitney Riders in New York City
David King, Columbia University

Predicting bike share usage using city open data
Ken Steif, University of Pennsylvania

The Sidewalk Should Not Just End: Pedestrian & Bicycle Infrastructure Planning as part of a Real Transportation Network
Kathleen Meghan Wieters, University of Oklahoma

Presenters
BB

Blaise Bordeleau

Université de Montréal
DK

David King

Columbia University
KS

Ken Steif

Doctoral Candidate, University of Pennsylvania
avatar for Kathleen Meghan Wieters

Kathleen Meghan Wieters

University of Oklahoma
This will be my second year at UAA and I am excited to meet more people! I am very interested in perspectives from different disciplines on how we can encourage our communities to value equity issues -- access to land uses, access to transportation options, access to health care, and safe, healthy places to live for all incomes and people.

Moderators
DK

David King

Columbia University

Thursday April 9, 2015 9:15am - 10:40am
Cambridge (2nd floor)

9:15am

TH9.15.13 Shrinking cities: New challenges for urban planners
Moderator: J. Rosie Tighe, Cleveland State University

Assessing the smart-shrinkage approach in canadian cities : lessons from Saint-John, New-Brunswick
Stéphanie Benoit, University of Montreal; Jean-Philippe Meloche, University of Montreal

The Impact of Population Loss on Large American Cities
Daniel Kuhlmann, Cornell University; Michael Manville, Cornell University

Shrinking Cities and Shifting Metropolitan Land Use Patterns
Andrea Sarzynski, University of Delaware

When it comes to Urban Decline, What do We Mean?
J. Rosie Tighe, Cleveland State University; Joanna Ganning, University of Utah

Presenters
avatar for Stéphanie Benoit

Stéphanie Benoit

MSc Planning Student, Universite de Montreal
DK

Daniel Kuhlmann

Cornell University
AS

Andrea Sarzynski

University of Delaware
avatar for J. Rosie Tighe

J. Rosie Tighe

Assistant Professor, Cleveland State University

Moderators
avatar for J. Rosie Tighe

J. Rosie Tighe

Assistant Professor, Cleveland State University

Thursday April 9, 2015 9:15am - 10:40am
Godfrey (lobby level)

9:15am

TH9.15.14 Exploring the limits of globalization
Moderator: Jill Tao, Incheon National University

The State of Global Smart Cities
Sukumar Ganapati, Florida International University; Elvis Asorwoe, Florida International University

“It’s Not Easy Bein’ Green”: Resolving Center-Periphery Discrepancies in the Definition of “Green” Programs for Transnational Problems
Jill Tao, Incheon National University

The World Bank and Soft Coercion: A History of Bus Rapid Transit Projects in the Developing World
Craig Townsend, Concordia University

Cities and Happiness: Discovering the relationship between material consumption and subjective well-being in urban spaces
Kailas Venkitasubramanian, University of North Carolina at Charlotte; Jean-Claude Thill, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Presenters
SG

Sukumar Ganapati

Florida International University
avatar for Jill Tao

Jill Tao

Associate Professor, Incheon National University
Mayors in East Asia, how to measure Confucian norms in local government, global bureaucrats and environmental issues.
avatar for Craig Townsend

Craig Townsend

Associate Professor, Concordia University
KV

Kailas Venkitasubramanian

University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Moderators
avatar for Jill Tao

Jill Tao

Associate Professor, Incheon National University
Mayors in East Asia, how to measure Confucian norms in local government, global bureaucrats and environmental issues.

Thursday April 9, 2015 9:15am - 10:40am
Alhambra (2nd floor)

9:15am

TH9.15.15 Global City Sydney
Sydney has emerged as a major global or world city in the 21st Century. This panel examines the global city thesis, which dominates urban scholarship and practice and whether it adequately captures the Sydney experience. Although the global city thesis is a useful analytical construct for policy makers and scholars, it is incomplete in charting Sydney’s rise and current problems. The global city thesis ignores the political institutions and processes that actually shape and direct the global city. The City of Sydney is a small share of the city-region, accounting for only about 4 percent of the metropolis. Sydney lacks a metropolitan or regional government and has few regional collaborative processes or platforms. Rather, the global city strategy of Sydney is shaped and directed by the state of New South Wales. This is contrary to the political decentralization and devolution trends heralded by international actors such as OECD. Sydney also illustrates the dilemma of global cities in that those members at the top of the knowledge economy are highly rewarded and those in the middle and lower strata face difficulty maintaining or improving their situation. Local government lacks the capacity to act independently and the state and federal governments are unwilling to address serious urban problems associated with globalization, such as public transit or housing. Given their focus on austerity policies and embrace of neoliberalism, the global city vision advanced by leaders is threatened. There is little concrete policy offered by any level of government to address the crisis.

Sydney, a Global City for Whom?: Bringing Back Discussions of Equity
Roberta Ryan, University of Technology, Sydney

Transportation and Planning in the Sydney City-Region
Peter Walsh, University of Technology, Sydney

Economic Competitiveness: Sydney’s Global City Strategy
Bligh Grant, University of Technology, Sydney

Governing Global City Sydney
Alex Lawrie, University of Technology, Sydney; Neil Selmon, University of Technology, Sydney; Ronald Vogel, Ryerson University

Presenters
avatar for Bligh Grant

Bligh Grant

Senior Lecturer, University of Technology Sydney
I am a political scientist specialising in local government studies, particularly in Australia but also in international comparative perspective. Australia-U.S.-Canada comparative material has waned in recent years and us coming to UAA is to establish links in North America. My co-authored published work covers a broad range of subject areas and for UAA this year we are following up from a Panel Session on Sydney as a Global City that we... Read More →
avatar for Alex Lawrie

Alex Lawrie

Researcher, University of Technology, Sydney
Alex Lawrie is a Researcher who formerly worked in urban planning and public policy for a range of private and government clients across Queensland and New South Wales. Alex is a talented young urban planner with particular expertise in statutory, strategic and social planning, public policy review and analysis, community engagement, demography, and large-scale quantitative and qualitative data analysis. | He has had specialised training in... Read More →
avatar for Roberta Ryan

Roberta Ryan

Institute Director, University of Technology Sydney
Associate Professor Roberta Ryan is a leading social researcher and policy, program evaluation and stakeholder engagement practitioner with over 30 years’ experience in both the public and private sectors. With a strong interest in the relationship between people and places she has worked in and with local government in areas of community services, strategic planning, land use planning, sustainability, organisational change and development... Read More →
avatar for Peter Walsh

Peter Walsh

University of Technology, Sydney
Peter Walsh is a research associate at the Centre for Local Government at University of Technology Sydney, and is undertaking doctoral research at Swinburne University of Technology Melbourne. Peter is a Fellow of the Planning Institute of Australia and has operated a consulting planning practice in Sydney for over 20 years.

Moderators
avatar for Ronald Vogel

Ronald Vogel

Department of Politics and Public Administration, Ryerson University
My research interests focus on metropolitan governance, global cities, and comparative urban politics.

Thursday April 9, 2015 9:15am - 10:40am
Michelangelo (2nd floor)

9:15am

TH9.15.16 Devolution, Privatization and Special Purpose Governance Structures
Moderator: Douglas Ihrke, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Examining Conflict on Public and Nonprofit School Boards in the United States
Douglas Ihrke, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee; Michael Ford, University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh

Change in the Urban Political Ecology: A Sequence Analysis of Urban Institutional Change in Adjacent Policy Fields
Jack Lucas, University of Alberta

The Layered City: Governance Structures and Service Provision in the 21st Century
Daniel Pasciuti, The Johns Hopkins University

Presenters
DI

Douglas Ihrke

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
JL

Jack Lucas

University of Alberta
avatar for Daniel S Pasciuti

Daniel S Pasciuti

Assistant Professor, Georgia State University
I am a comparative-historical sociologist and Assistant Professor at Georgia State University. I am also a Research Scientist in the Arrighi Center for Global Studies at Johns Hopkins University. My research interests include comparative-historical sociology, historical capitalism, global inequality, urbanization and urban development in world history and contemporary forms of urban governance.

Moderators
DI

Douglas Ihrke

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Thursday April 9, 2015 9:15am - 10:40am
Flagler (lobby level)

9:15am

TH9.15.17 Revitalization efforts and its impact on the economy
Moderator: Mary Rocco, University of Pennsylvania

Why can’t we all live in small, liberal-arts-college towns? Cruel optimism and new economy narratives of revitalization in the “forgotten city” of Willimantic, Connecticut
Shelley Buchbinder, The Graduate Center, City University of New York

Rising from the Rust: Evaluating the Impact of Brownfield Redevelopment Projects on Neighborhood Character in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Amanda C. Micklow, Cornell University

Urban Revitalization without Gentrification?: A Comparative Analysis of Development Intervention Efforts in Three Historically Black Street Corridors using Geographic Information Systems
David Padgett, Tennessee State University; Doug Perkins, Vanderbilt University; Karl Jones, Vanderbilt University

Partnerships, Philanthropy and Innovation: Urban Revitalization in US Legacy Cities
Mary Rocco, University of Pennsylvania

Presenters
avatar for Shelley Buchbinder

Shelley Buchbinder

The Graduate Center, City University of New York
AM

Amanda Micklow

Cornell University
DP

David Padgett

Tennessee State University
Tennessee State University
MR

Mary Rocco

Doctoral Candidate, University of Pennsylvania

Moderators
MR

Mary Rocco

Doctoral Candidate, University of Pennsylvania

Thursday April 9, 2015 9:15am - 10:40am
Dupont (lobby level)

9:15am

TH9.15.18 Public Incentives: How Effective Are They in Generating Public Benefits?
Moderator: George C. Homsy, Binghamton University

Impact of the New Markets Tax Credit and Low Income Housing Tax Credit Programs in Low-Income Urban Communities
Michael Henderson, Georgia State University

Incentivizing Sustainability: Exploring the Success of a Market-based Zoning Strategy
George C. Homsy, Binghamton University; Gina S. Abrams, Binghamton University

Estimating the Economic Impact of State-Level Earned Income Tax Credits
Eric Stokan, George Washington University

Presenters
MH

Michael Henderson

Georgia State University
avatar for George C. Homsy

George C. Homsy

Assistant Professor, State University of New York, Binghamton
Local government and neighborhood level sustainability efforts
ES

Eric Stokan

George Washington University

Moderators
avatar for George C. Homsy

George C. Homsy

Assistant Professor, State University of New York, Binghamton
Local government and neighborhood level sustainability efforts

Thursday April 9, 2015 9:15am - 10:40am
Tuttle (lobby level)

9:15am

TH9.15.19 Addressing Economic Inequality after the Great Recession: Policy, Planning, and Reshaped Landscapes of Opportunity in the City
In the wake of the Great Recession policymakers continue to grapple with increasing economic inequality. Across the nation unprecedented levels of socioeconomic stratification have resulted in the emergence of a dual reality for urban economies: persistent poverty, long term unemployment, and socioeconomic exclusion existing alongside economic promise and mobility. In response policymakers have sought to support individual economic mobility by implementing policies that promote job creation, encourage employability and financial security. Yet many policy and planning debates remain largely informed by pre-recessionary theories and understandings of how and the ways in which micro and macro level actors, processes, strategies, and contingencies shape the economic settings of urban communities - particularly for disadvantaged and marginalized populations. As a result, these debates remain largely uninformed about the meso-level interactions that occurred between these two scales during the Great Recession and their influence on economic opportunity in the post-recessionary era. This panel advances research in this area through four papers. Visser explores the impact of the Great Recession on the structural change of employment in urban economies and the implications this presents for economic development at multiple levels. Melendez examines the interstate mobility patterns of Latinos during the Great Recession and investigates the relative importance of economic restructuring and social opportunity on migration patterns across Latino ethnic groups. In a case study of America's "most creative city" Martin interrogates how the resurgence of businesses in Durham have impacted the economic mobility of the African American population. Finally, Servon considers how policy discourses surrounding financial decisions made by low and moderate income people are outdated in relation to the contexts and conditions in which such decisions are made in the post recessionary era.


Restructuring Opportunity and Mobility: The Great Recession and the Quality of Employment in the US Labor Market
M. Anne Visser, University of California, Davis

The Great Recession and the Interstate Mobility of Latinos
Edwin Melendez, Hunter College, CUNY & Center for Puerto Rican Studies

A View From the Most “Creative” City In The U.S.: Entrepreneurship and the Transformation of Durham, North Carolina
NIna Martin, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Reconsidering Frames of Financial Inclusion: Use of "Alternative" Financial Services during and after the Great Recession
Lisa J. Servon

Presenters
NM

Nina Martin

University of North Carolina at Chaple Hill
EM

Edwin Melendez

Hunter College, CUNY
LJ

Lisa J. Servon

servonl@newschool.edu
MA

M. Anne Visser

University of California, Davis

Moderators
EM

Edwin Melendez

Hunter College, CUNY

Thursday April 9, 2015 9:15am - 10:40am
Gusman (lobby level)

9:15am

TH9.15.20 Moving through the City
Moderator: Yasminah Beebeejaun, University College London

Walk With Ease: Promoting Physical Activity for Urban Older Adults in South Florida
Chelsie Anderson, Florida International University; Richard Palmer, Florida International University

Does Greenway Network Effectively Support Transport-related Physical Activity among Adults? : A Case Study in Shenzhen, China
Liu Kun: The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, School of Design; Harbin Institute of Technology, Shenzhen Graduate School
Gong Yongxi: Harbin Institute of Technology, Shenzhen Graduate School; Lu Dan: Harbin Institute of Technology, Shenzhen Graduate School; Gao Yuan: Harbin Institute of Technology, Shenzhen Graduate School; Yu Miao: Harbin Institute of Technology, Shenzhen Graduate School; Jiang Qiaolu: Harbin Institute of Technology, Shenzhen Graduate School; Siu Kin Wai: The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, School of Design

Assessing walkability in the Montreal metropolitan area: The potential of three urban forms from 1920 to 1990.
Sébastien LORD, University of Montréal; Paula Negron-Poblete, University of Montréal

An Assessment of Social and Health Equity in Atlanta Streets Alive Events
Katie Perumbeti, Georgia Institute of Technology

Presenters
CA

Chelsie Anderson

Florida International University
KL

Kun Liu

Hong Kong Polytechnic University; Harbin Institute of Technology
avatar for Sébastien Lord

Sébastien Lord

Assistant Professor, University of Montréal
KP

Katie Perumbeti

Georgia Institute of Technology, School of City and Regional Planning

Moderators
YB

Yasminah Beebeejaun

Lecturer, University College London

Thursday April 9, 2015 9:15am - 10:40am
Oxford (2nd floor)

10:40am

11:00am

TH11.00.03 The Politics of Neighborhood Revitlization in the Post-Industrial City
This colloquy is on the politics of neighborhood revitalization draws on a study covering six North American Cities: Baltimore, Chicago, Denver, Los Angeles, Phoenix, and Toronto. These cities show a broad shift in neighborhood policy and politics from an earlier redevelopment period to the present time. The new era entails a less cohesive governing circle, a more diverse body of players (“ed and med” institutions, organizations from the philanthropic sector, nonprofit intermediaries, collective business organizations now playing a lesser part than in the past, and in both Canada and the U.S. a diminished federal role), and a varied assortment of policy tools ranging from comprehensive community initiatives through transit-oriented development, community benefits agreements, and mixed-income redevelopment projects. In contrast with the postwar period of redevelopment, a looser assemblage of actors around a more open agenda expands the possibility of a more robust effort to revitalize neighborhoods populated by residents faced with significant social distress. While aging neighborhoods with disadvantaged residents now get some positive attention and no longer face the deep disregard so widespread at an earlier time, they continue to face major challenges of social reconstruction. Further, such neighborhoods rarely enjoy sustained, high-priority attention. Current experiences will be used in order to identify steps that could strengthen the political position of distressed neighborhoods for advancing an agenda of social reconstruction. The aim of the colloquy is to discuss an appropriate reform agenda that could apply across cities in support of the aim of neighborhood revitalization.

Presenters
MH

Martin Horak

University of Western Ontario
JM

Juliet Musso

University of Southern California
ES

Ellen Shiau

California State University at Los Angeles
RS

Robert Stoker

George Washington University

Moderators
CS

Clarence Stone

George Washington University

Thursday April 9, 2015 11:00am - 12:25pm
Windsor (2nd floor)

11:00am

TH11.00.06 Labor Activism in Miami – A Global City from the Perspective of Low Wage Workers and Advocates
Behind Miami’s exterior as a global city is a low wage workforce that provides the services to support this image and endures many challenges: immigration issues, tenuous rights on the job, insufficient wages & wage theft. This colloquy explores Miami area workers’ issues, featuring scholar activists from FIU’s Center for Labor Research & Studies. We highlight issues currently facing the Miami workforce stemming from the prevalence of tourism and service sector employment. Miami has high poverty rates, low wages, a low level of unionization and a huge immigrant population. Tensions exist within the workforce along the immigrant/native and racial lines. The immigrants groups are at different levels of progress, ranging from the unique issues for Haitians to the influence of the Cuban community locally and nationally. Other Latino groups are also present and growing in Miami. Within this environment, against great odds, recent labor victories include: living wage ordinances in Miami-Dade & Broward Counties, Miami Beach & the City of Miami. Unionization is growing in health care and building services. Miami-Dade was the first Florida county to pass a wage theft ordinance that includes strong enforcement mechanisms. Immigrant advocates were successful in ending local police cooperation with ICE around deportation procedures. Current campaigns focus on issues facing taxi workers and plant nursery industry workers. The panel will take up the questions below and others during discussion with session attendees: How can the Miami economy be characterized in terms of dominant industries and workers issues? How were victories accomplished? Who are the supportive activists in the larger community? How do local Miami politics intersect with these issues and the respective organizations? What are some of the most important issues that you think conference attendees should know about and “take away” from being in Miami?

Presenters
CH

Cynthia ‎ Hernandez

Florida International University
avatar for Bruce Nissen

Bruce Nissen

Florida International University
AN

Andrea Nunez

Florida International University

Moderators
LS

Louise Simmons

Professor of Social Work & Director, UConn Urban Semester Program, University of Connecticut
Social and economic justice

Thursday April 9, 2015 11:00am - 12:25pm
Raphael (2nd floor)

11:00am

TH11.00.07 A Miracle on Cooper Street: A case of Study of how a University Professor transform a Community through a School name the LEAP Academy
The Miracle on Cooper Street t ells the story of Dr. Gloria Bonilla-Santiago as a destitute Puerto Rican child of migrant farm workers who defied family, tradition and expectations to reach the highest ranks of academia and overcome monumental obstacles to create one of the nation’s best Charter Schools in America’s poorest and most violent city, Camden NJ. Her personal journey began on a beautiful farm in Puerto Rico and led to gritty migrant worker camps in New Jersey and Florida. Her tenacity, resiliency and commitment to overcome poverty and challenges in learning to navigate a foreign educational system are a true example of leadership. Her education journey earned her multiple degrees and took her to the pinnacle of academia as a Board of Governors Distinguished Service Professor in the Public Administration Department and Director of the Community Leadership Center at Rutgers University. Today she is a National leader, social entrepreneur and educational expert in designing schools for urban Children. Those experiences forged a dream of transforming a poor urban community through education. The Miracle on Cooper Street describes the movement to create an educational pipeline from birth to college with a comprehensive agenda of support services that responds to the desperate needs of urban schools in America. The LEAP Case Study is unmatched anywhere, graduating 100 percent of its students who have achieved 100 percent admission to college. This model is gaining momentum through grassroots efforts, and state and federal initiatives. Dr. Santiago describes the process for how she organized parents and stakeholders for legislative planning, implementation to lessons from practice to upscale the model. She builds a compelling case for broad public commitment to improving the urban school environment in disadvantaged communities.

Presenters
GB

Gloria Bonilla-Santiago

Rutgers the State Univeristy-Camden Campus
MC

Matthew Closter

Graduate Assistant and PhD Student, Rutgers University - Camden
Matthew Closter is currently working on his PhD in Public Affairs with a focus on Community Development at Rutgers University in Camden. He is also a Graduate Assistant and Student Fellow at the Rutgers-Camden Community Leadership Center. His research interests include the roles of urban public institutions in revitalizing distressed communities, the intersection of philanthropy and government, and collaborations between civic organizations... Read More →
WG

Wanda Garcia

Rutgers , the state university of NJ

Moderators
WG

Wanda Garcia

Rutgers , the state university of NJ

Thursday April 9, 2015 11:00am - 12:25pm
Star Isle (lobby level)

11:00am

TH11.00.20 ‘City Abroad’: International Programs, Undergraduate Education, and Urban Studies
Students at US colleges and universities have ‘gone abroad’ since the 1920s, with many of these experiences taking places in cities around the world. Yet, often times these experiences are framed by disciplinary approaches or topics that diminish their urban context. This session will focus on pedagogical approaches, ‘classroom’ techniques, and programmatic structures that effectively integrate study abroad experiences into a broader Urban Studies curriculum. Speakers will explore linkages between international urban academic programs and critical thinking about local urban processes, challenges and context; world cities, cosmopolitan subjectivities, and intercultural competence; integrating structured educational activities and informal experiential education into course curriculum; and the academic and social objectives of international urban academic programs. Speakers will also reflect on institutional challenges and invite colloquy participants to contribute experiences.

Presenters
CJ

Carol Jambor-Smith

CAPA International Education
JS

Joseph Stanley

Director of International Programs, Simmons College
ET

Elizabeth Thomas

Director of Urban Studies, Associate Professor of Psychology, Rhodes College

Moderators

Thursday April 9, 2015 11:00am - 12:25pm
Trinity (2nd floor)

11:00am

TH11.00.19 Aging in the City: It’s Not What We Planned
According to the Brookings Institution the context of aging in place for a number of American urban areas is changing due to sharp increases in Asian and Hispanic immigration coupled with a large population of white non-Hispanic Baby Boomers that is remaining in suburban areas as they age (Frey, 2014). Miami is one of five U.S. metropolitan areas identified as having population growth largely driven by international migration patterns, which will ultimately lead to high concentrations of minority and foreign-born older residents. This demographic poses unique opportunities and challenges for urban planners and human service providers alike. This session will focus on the nature of aging in place in Miami, with specific detail on how issues of transportation, health and mental health care, housing, and cultural diversity are factors in addressing the complex needs of older adults in a dynamic, complex urban context. The speakers will provide perspectives of urban aging from a variety of viewpoints including that of a government liaison, human service planner and administrator, and direct service provider.

Presenters
DB

Daniel Brady

Douglass Gardens Community Mental Health Center
DS

David Saltman

Miami-Dade Mayor's Initiative on Aging
TS

Tatiana Sam

Little Havana Activities Center

Moderators
DS

David Saltman

Miami-Dade Mayor's Initiative on Aging

Thursday April 9, 2015 11:00am - 12:25pm
Michelangelo (2nd floor)

11:00am

TH11.00.01 Comparative Housing and Urban Policies
Moderator: Robert Chaskin, The University of Chicago

Citizens’ Initiatives in the Housing Policy Field: the Case of Lithuania
Jolanta Aidukaite, Lithuanian Social Research Centre

The Density Debate in Dubai’s Neighborhood Development: Myths and Opportunities of Implementation
Khaled Alawadi, Masdar Institute of Science and Technology

Through the Looking Glass? Slum Clearance, Urban Renewal, and Social Housing in Mumbai
Robert Chaskin, The University of Chicago

Urban Renewal, Gentrification, and the Change of Social Capital in Seoul, South Korea
Byungwoo Cho, University of Nebraska Omaha; Jeong Joo Ahn, Arizona State University

Presenters
avatar for Jolanta Aidukaite

Jolanta Aidukaite

Senior Research Fellow, Lithuanian Social Research Centre
Jolanta Aidukaite has published extensively on a social policy development in the three Baltic States. Her main research and teaching interests are comparative social policy; family policy; poverty and urban segregation; housing policy and urban movements.
avatar for Khaled Alawadi

Khaled Alawadi

Assistant Professor, Masdar Institute of Science and Technology
Rethinking the city through sustainability paradigm. Khaled’s research and teaching are focused on the role of urban design and planning in promoting sustainable development and the big question is: “Which urban forms, technological solutions, and policy initiatives will effectively deliver greater environmental, social, and economic coherence in our regions, cities, and neighborhoods?”
RC

Robert Chaskin

The University of Chicago
avatar for B. Shine Cho

B. Shine Cho

University of Nebraska - Omaha
B. Shine Cho is a doctoral candidate and instructor at School of Public Administration, University of Nebraska at Omaha. He is expecting to graduate in May 2016. | | His specialty is in public budgeting & finance and urban management. His dissertation, titled "A Study of Budget Reform based on Organizational Theories - Focusing on the City of Lincoln, NE", begins by questioning which organizational factors bring about successful... Read More →

Moderators
RC

Robert Chaskin

The University of Chicago

Thursday April 9, 2015 11:00am - 12:25pm
Alhambra (2nd floor)

11:00am

TH11.00.02 Using Making Connections Data to Explore Influences, Experiences and Perceptions of Urban Life in Disadvantaged Neighborhoods
The Making Connections study was designed to inform an initiative aimed at improving neighborhood conditions for families with children. While not initially designed for academic purposes, the Making Connections Survey was conducted in accordance with scientific standards and addresses topics of great interest to researchers in the fields of economics, psychology, public health, public policy, social work, and sociology. The survey examines mobility, social capital and networks, neighborhood processes, resident perceptions and participation, economic hardship, the availability and utilization of services and resources, and child and adolescent well-being. The dataset includes both a cross section of disadvantaged urban neighborhood residents and longitudinal data for families with children at three points in time, over a ten year period. In each of the ten Making Connections sites baseline and wave 2 data were collected from 800 households. A third wave of data were collected from 800 households in seven of the ten sites. In this panel young researchers using these data present findings across a spectrum of topics. Megan Gilster presents data about neighborhood engagement, residential tenure and social ties. Anita Zuberi examines neighborhood distress, in the form of both physical and social conditions, and child health outcomes. Amanda Roy looks at neighborhood characteristics and how they play a role in child health and the ability to access health care. Julia Burdick-Will describes the consequences of non-local school attendance on neighborhood perception. Finally, Carlos Siordia uses the digitized data from hand drawn maps to investigate how computational geometry can be used to determine concentricity and to explore the variation as a function of age, sex and educational attainment.


Neighborhood Social Processes, Access to Health Care, and Child Health
Amanda L. Roy, University of Illinois - Chicago

Low-Income Neighborhoods and Child Health: Assessing the Influence of Physical and Social Neighborhood Conditions on Childhood Health
Anita Zuberi, Samantha; Teixeira

Mobility and Social Support: Barriers to Resident Participation in Making Connections Neighborhoods
Megan E. Gilster, University of Iowa

Using Hand Draw “Residential Neighborhood” to Compute Polygon Concentricity and Investigate its Predictors
Carlos Siordia, University of Pittsburgh; Claudia Colton 

Decoupling Schools and Neighborhoods: Using Making Connections to Understand How Opting Out of Local Schools Shapes Neighborhood Perceptions
Julia Burdick-Will, Johns Hopkins University

Presenters
JB

Julia Burdick-Will

Johns Hopkins University
ME

Megan E. Gilster

University of Iowa
AL

Amanda L. Roy

University of Illinois - Chicago
CS

Carlos Siordia

University of Pittsburgh
AZ

Anita Zuberi

University of Pittsburgh

Moderators
CH

Catherine Haggerty

NORC, University of Chicago

Thursday April 9, 2015 11:00am - 12:25pm
Balmoral (2nd floor)

11:00am

TH11.00.04 Efficacy of Mixed Income Redevelopment or Organic Mixing
Moderator: Hélène Bélanger, Université du Québec à Montréal

Social Mix: How Is This Issue Addressed in Montreal?
Hélène Bélanger, Université du Québec à Montréal; Richard Morin, Université du Québec à Montréal

Achieving greater success in public housing transformation: Implications of the Atlanta and Chicago models for the emerging San Francisco model
Rachel Kleit, The Ohio State University; Mark Joseph, Case Western Reserve; Nancy Latham, Learning for Action, LLC; Steven LaFrance, Learning for Action LLC

Negotiating Diversification: Immigrant Settlement and Neighborhood Change - The Case of Greektown in Baltimore City, Maryland
Naka Matsumoto, University of Maryland, College Park

The Impacts of Work Requirements on Employment among Public Housing Residents: Findings from a Longitudinal Study of the Charlotte Housing Authority’s Moving to Work Program
William M Rohe, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Michael Webb, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Kirstin Frescoln, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Perception of Neighborhood Safety after HOPE VI Relocation
Ramona Stone, University of Kentucky; Alicia Daily, University of Louisville

Presenters
avatar for Helene Belanger

Helene Belanger

Professor, Université du Québec à Montréal
avatar for Rachel Garshick Kleit

Rachel Garshick Kleit

Professor, Ohio State University
I'm a researcher and urban planner interested in poverty reduction and the social impacts of housing on the lives of the poor.
avatar for Naka Matsumoto

Naka Matsumoto

PhD Candidate, University of Maryland, College Park
avatar for William M Rohe

William M Rohe

Cary C. Boshamer Distinguished Professor and Director, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Affordable housing, central city and neighborhood revitalization
RS

Ramona Stone

University of Kentucky

Moderators
avatar for Helene Belanger

Helene Belanger

Professor, Université du Québec à Montréal

Thursday April 9, 2015 11:00am - 12:25pm
Sandringham (2nd floor)

11:00am

TH11.00.05 The politics and language of race
Moderator: Sylvie Paré, Unniversité du Québec à Montréal

Urban Adolescents’ Trust in Leaders and Their Hope for the Future, 1992-2014
Edith Barrett, University of Connecticut

Post-Latino Mayors: San Antonio Politics and Policies
Sharon Navarro, University of Texas at San Antonio

The Impact of Municipal Amalgamation on the Management of Social Diversity in Montreal
Sylvie Paré, Unniversité du Québec à Montréal

Presenters
avatar for Edith Barrett

Edith Barrett

Director, Urban and Community Studies, University of Connecticut
SN

Sharon Navarro

Associate Professor, University of Texas at San Antonio
avatar for Sylvie Paré

Sylvie Paré

Professeure titulaire, University of Quebec in Montreal
Je m'intéresse aux questions de genre, d'ethnicité et de classes sociales dans la ville, à Montréal ou à Toronto. Pour le moment, mes travaux portent essentiellement sur les femmes immigrantes entrepreneures de Montréal, le genre et territoire et la transition du quartier de la Cité-Jardin du Tricentenaire.

Moderators
avatar for Sylvie Paré

Sylvie Paré

Professeure titulaire, University of Quebec in Montreal
Je m'intéresse aux questions de genre, d'ethnicité et de classes sociales dans la ville, à Montréal ou à Toronto. Pour le moment, mes travaux portent essentiellement sur les femmes immigrantes entrepreneures de Montréal, le genre et territoire et la transition du quartier de la Cité-Jardin du Tricentenaire.

Thursday April 9, 2015 11:00am - 12:25pm
Escorial (2nd floor)

11:00am

TH11.00.08 Community Organizing and Social Movements
Moderator: Jonathan S. Davies, De Montfort University

Game of the city re-negotiated: urban movement as an emerging actor of a strategic action field. Case of Poland.
Anna Domaradzka, Institute for Social Studies, University of Warsaw; Filip Wijkström, Stockholm School of Economics

Affect’s role in collective action discourse: Political lessons in mitigating environmental risk in Chicago’s Little Village
Luis Martinez, Cornell University

Occupying the Urban Public Policy Agenda: Measuring the Success of the Occupy Wall Street Movement
Adam Uddin, Wayne State University; Stephen Polk, Flux Factory Artist Collective

Social Stability Maintenance and Environmental Activism in Urban China
Xiaoyi SUN, City University of Hong Kong

Presenters
avatar for Anna Domaradzka

Anna Domaradzka

Assistant Professor, Associate Director for Research, University of Warsaw
avatar for Luis Martinez

Luis Martinez

PhD Student, Cornell University
XS

Xiaoyi SUN

City University of Hong Kong
AU

Adam Uddin

Wayne State University

Moderators
avatar for Jonathan S. Davies

Jonathan S. Davies

Professor of Critical Policy Studies, De Montfort University
I am Professor of Critical Policy Studies in the Department of Politics and Public Policy at De Montfort. My research interests span critical issues in governance, state theory, urban studies and public policy. I am currently working on a variety of projects on crisis, austerity governance and contestation. From April 2015 I will be leading an international consortium of researchers in an ESRC funded eight-case comparative study of austerity... Read More →

Thursday April 9, 2015 11:00am - 12:25pm
Gusman (lobby level)

11:00am

TH11.00.09 New directions in the study of non-profits
Moderator: Muthusami Kumaran, University of Florida

Profiles in Public Service: Diversity in Executive Succession Planning
Karl W Besel, Indiana University Kokomo; Todd Bradley, Indiana University Kokomo; Charlotte Williams, Clinton School of Public Service, University of Arkansas Little Rock

Understanding Government Funding for Nonprofit Organizations in US Counties: Revisiting Third Party Government Theory
Hediye Kilic Gorunmek, University of North Texas; Hee Soun Jang, Assistant Professor-UNT

Home and Community based social services for the fast growing older American population in Florida's cities: Role of nonprofits in Florida's Aging Network
Muthusami Kumaran, University of Florida

Getting to the Roots of Homelessness: Breaking Through to a More Holistic, Client-Focused Advocacy Agenda
Zachary Wood, Rutgers University - Camden; Zachary D. Wood, Rutgers University - Camden

Rethinking Sectoral Roles: Nonprofit and Philanthropic Leadership in Urban Economic Development
Michelle Wooddell, Grand Valley State University; Michelle Wooddell Grand Valley State University,

Presenters
KB

Karl Besel

Indiana University Kokomo
HK

Hediye Kilic gorunmek

University of North Texas
KK

Kumaran Kumaran

University of Florida
avatar for Zachary Wood

Zachary Wood

Rutgers University - Camden
MW

Michelle Wooddell

Grand Valley State University

Moderators
KK

Kumaran Kumaran

University of Florida

Thursday April 9, 2015 11:00am - 12:25pm
Tuttle (lobby level)

11:00am

TH11.00.10 Design, Access and the Right to the City
Moderator: James DeFillipis, Rutgers University

Privatizing Public Space: Design and Use of Bonus Spaces in Taichung City, Taiwan
Te-Sheng Huang, Feng Chia University; Ming-Jen Cheng, Feng Chia University

The Nature(s) of Urban Renewal: Instrumentalizing Ecology on the High Line
Joern Langhorst, University of Colorado Denver, College of Architecture and Planning

The influence of urban design on the exercise of the right to the city: a Montreal case study.
Frédérique Roy Trempe, Université du Québec à Montréal. Canada research chair in socioterritorial conflict and local governance.; Catherine Trudelle, Université du Québec à Montréal. Canada research chair in socioterritorial conflict and local governance.; Winnie Frohn, Université du Québec à Montréal.

Urban Built Environments, Accessibility, and Travel Behavior in a Declining Urban Core: The Extreme Conditions of Disinvestment and Suburbanization in the Detroit Region
Igor Vojnovic, Michigan State University; Zeenat Kotval-K, Michigan State University; Jieun Lee, CUNY Hunter College; Minting Ye, Michigan State University; Timothy LeDoux, Westfield State University; Pariwate Varnakovida, Prince of Songkla University

Presenters
avatar for Te-Sheng Huang

Te-Sheng Huang

Assistant Professor, Feng Chia University
JL

Joern Langhorst

University of Colorado Denver, College of Architecture and Planning
FR

Frédérique Roy Trempe

Doctorante, Université du Québec à Montréal. Canada research chair in socioterritorial conflict and local governance.
IV

Igor Vojnovic

Michigan State University

Moderators
JD

James DeFilippis

Rutgers University

Thursday April 9, 2015 11:00am - 12:25pm
Hibiscus (lobby level)

11:00am

TH11.00.11 Questions of scale: the regional dimension to tackling climate change
Moderator: Ugo Lachapelle, University of Quebec in Montreal

Trans-local action and local climate policy in three German Cities. Bridging the gap between global aspiration and local implementation
Jörg Kemmerzell, Technische Universität Darmstadt

Telecommuting and sustainable travel: Reduction of overall travel time, increases in non-motorized travel and congestion relief?
Ugo Lachapelle, University of Quebec in Montreal; Georges Tanguay, University of Quebec in Montreal; Léa Neumark-Gaudet, University of Quebec in Montreal

Urban Tourism Performance and Sustainable Development: A Canadian Study
Georges A. Tanguay, University of Quebec in Montreal; Juste Rajaonson, University of Quebec in Montreal

Presenters
avatar for Jörg Kemmerzell

Jörg Kemmerzell

Institute for Political Science, Technical University Darmstadt
UL

Ugo Lachapelle

Université du Québec à Montréal
avatar for Georges A. Tanguay

Georges A. Tanguay

Professor, Université du Québec à Montréal

Moderators
UL

Ugo Lachapelle

Université du Québec à Montréal

Thursday April 9, 2015 11:00am - 12:25pm
Crandon (lobby level)

11:00am

TH11.00.12 Regulating land-use: 'disciplining' private property rights
Moderator: Darrel Ramsey-Musolf, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Downtown redevelopment and land-use regulation: can planning policies discipline property development?
Igal Charney, University of Haifa

Strategies for Inclusionary Zoning in Brazil Based on an International Perspective
Lara Furtado, University of Massachusetts Amherst; Clarissa Freitas

The Rules of Residential Segregation: American Housing Taxonomies and Their Precedents
Sonia A. Hirt, Virginia Tech University


French flight to the suburb and family residential choices in Montreal: A community based application of the Alonso modelJean-Philippe Meloche, Universite de Montreal

A mix of tension: zoning, homeowners, and private property
Darrel Ramsey-Musolf, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Presenters
IC

Igal Charney

University of Haifa
avatar for Lara Furtado

Lara Furtado

PhD Student | Regional Planning, University of Massachusetts Amherst
SA

Sonia A. Hirt

Virginia Tech University
avatar for Jean-Philippe Meloche

Jean-Philippe Meloche

Universite de Montreal
DR

Darrel Ramsey-Musolf

University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Moderators
DR

Darrel Ramsey-Musolf

University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Thursday April 9, 2015 11:00am - 12:25pm
Godfrey (lobby level)

11:00am

TH11.00.13 Scrutinizing infrastructre projects in the global era
Moderator: Joe Grengs, University of Michigan

Transportation Equity Beyond Costs and Burdens: Evaluating Benefits with Accessibility Metrics
Joe Grengs, University of Michigan

Airport areas: economic development across the spectrum of cities, or only for the big players?
Simon Mosbah, University of Pennsylvania

Water Woes and Flows: The Equity Implications of the Location of Combined Sewer Overflow Outfalls in US Cities
Miriam Solis, University of California, Berkeley; Aksel Olsen, University of California, Berkeley

Presenters
JG

Joe Grengs

University of Michigan
SM

Simon Mosbah

PhD Candidate, University of Pennsylvania
MS

Miriam Solis

UC Berkeley

Moderators
JG

Joe Grengs

University of Michigan

Thursday April 9, 2015 11:00am - 12:25pm
Marti (lobby level)

11:00am

TH11.00.14 Placing Politics: Making Places or Making Markets?
This panel presents critical analyses of the politics of value in urban planning practice through a variety of cases. These explore the role of market logics in: cycling advocacy; urban food policy; capital reinvestment in disinvested neighborhoods; the valuation of urban roadway projects; and the redevelopment of a historic neighborhood. The cases all consider the circumstances surrounding the application of market logics in urban planning and examine the implications of this approach. Part of the appeal of market-oriented planning stems from its apparent ability to negotiate through value-neutral mechanisms the diversity that Modernist planning sought to suppress through technical expertise. Market logics, however, impose their own form of singularity and inspire their own forms of opposition. This panel analyzes the variegated politics of market-oriented planning and provides a forum for considering the merits and limitations of its alternatives.


The Branding of an Iconic Experience: the Redevelopment of Coney Island
Juan J. Rivero, Rutgers University; Bloustein School of Planning

Reviving markets or reviving places: The tensions between market logics and critical alternatives in neighborhood reinvestment
Catherine Guimond, San Francisco Art Institute

Yes, In My Front Yard: The Politics of Hyper-Local Agrarian Policies in Los Angeles
Alexander Tarr, University of California Berkeley Department of Geography

Complete Streets, Thriving Corridors: Economic Localism and the Rescaling of Urban Politics
John Stehlin, University of California, Berkeley Department of Geography

Presenters
CG

Catherine Guimond

San Francisco Art Institute
avatar for Juan J. Rivero

Juan J. Rivero

Rutgers University; Bloustein School of Planning
avatar for John Stehlin

John Stehlin

University of California, Berkeley
avatar for Alexander Tarr

Alexander Tarr

PhD Candidate, University of California Berkeley Department of Geography

Moderators
avatar for Juan J. Rivero

Juan J. Rivero

Rutgers University; Bloustein School of Planning

Thursday April 9, 2015 11:00am - 12:25pm
Oxford (2nd floor)

11:00am

TH11.00.15 The City and Adaption to external factors
Moderator: Eva Kassens-Noor, Michigan State University

Production of Urban Space – An Analytical Framework to determine Urban Change
Cornelia Dlabaja, University of Vienna

Right to the City and 2014 World Cup Investments in Fortaleza, Brazil.
Clarissa Freitas, Universidade Federal do Ceará

The effect of real estate financialization on downtown urban restructuring: the case of São Paulo city
Priscila Izar, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

THE PROSPECT OF OLYMPIC TRANSPORT LEGACIES: THE CASE OF RIO DE JANEIRO’S BRT SYSTEM
Eva Kassens-Noor, Michigan State University; Chris Gaffney, Federal Fluminense University; Joe Messina, Michigan State University; Eric Phillips, DePaul University

Presenters
avatar for Cornelia Dlabaja

Cornelia Dlabaja

PHD-researcher, University of Vienna
Urban Change | Theory of Space | Social Housing, Housing in High-rises | Urban Production of Space | Community-based Planning | Urban Interventions
avatar for Clarissa Freitas

Clarissa Freitas

Professor, Universidade Federal do Ceará
avatar for Priscila Izar

Priscila Izar

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
avatar for Eva Kassens-Noor

Eva Kassens-Noor

Michigan State University
“Discovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought.” | Albert Szent-Györgyi | [Nobel Prize 1937]

Moderators
avatar for Eva Kassens-Noor

Eva Kassens-Noor

Michigan State University
“Discovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought.” | Albert Szent-Györgyi | [Nobel Prize 1937]

Thursday April 9, 2015 11:00am - 12:25pm
Palm Isle (lobby level)

11:00am

TH11.00.16 Power, Politics and Urban Development
Moderator: James M. Smith, Indiana University South Bend

How and Why Hurricane Katrina Changed Politics and Policy in New Orleans
Matthew O. Thomas, California State University, Chico; Peter F. Burns, Loyola University New Orleans

 ‘Control the South’: The Spatial Logic of Development Planning in Urumqi, Xinjiang Before and After the ‘7-9’ Riots
Lauren Hansen, Cornell University

Infrastructure, housing and planning: the failure of governance and planning reform in Sydney
Alan Peters, UNSW Australia

Toward the Post-Mayoral City?: Mega-Project Development in Berlin and Chicago
James M. Smith, Indiana University South Bend; Annika Marlen Hinze, Fordham University

Presenters
avatar for Peter Burns

Peter Burns

Loyola University New Orleans
Anyone have good pictures from UConn basketball games?
LH

Lauren Hansen

Cornell University
AP

Alan Peters

University of New South Wales, Australia
JM

James M. Smith

Indiana University South Bend

Moderators
JM

James M. Smith

Indiana University South Bend

Thursday April 9, 2015 11:00am - 12:25pm
Flagler (lobby level)

11:00am

TH11.00.17 Sport construction, identity and economic development
Moderator: William Holt, Birmingham-Southern College

Factors Affecting the Sustainability of Public-Private Collaborations at the Municipal Level: The Case of Motorcycle Rallies
Anne Diallo, University of Arkansas

Fields of Schemes: Baseball, Stadiums & Urban Evolution in Atlanta, 1960-2015
William Holt, Birmingham-Southern College

Anatomy of a Bankruptcy: Hockey in the Desert, Glendale, and an Urban Plan Gone Awry
Mark Rosentraub, University of Michigan; David Swindell, Arizona State University; Stephanie Gerretsen, University of Michigan

Presenters
AD

Anne Diallo

University of Arkansas
WH

William Holt

Birmingham-Southern College
MR

Mark Rosentraub

University of Michigan

Moderators
WH

William Holt

Birmingham-Southern College

Thursday April 9, 2015 11:00am - 12:25pm
Dupont (lobby level)

11:00am

TH11.00.18 Urban indicators and city life
Moderator: Melina Patterson, University of Mary Washington

Place-making in metropolitan deathscapes: Dead-disposal, cultural politics and urban planning in Colombia
Christien Klaufus, Centre for Latin American Research and Documentation

Mapping parks across time and space: race and nature in a Southern city:
Melina Patterson, University of Mary Washington

Visual Methods in Urban Research: An Integrated Framework
Luc Pauwels, University of Antwerp, Belgium

Mortgage Finance and Stratification in the United States: How Origination and Underwriting Patterns Structure Wealth-Building Trajectories
Megan K. Peppel, University of California Berkeley

Presenters
CK

Christien Klaufus

Assistant professor of Human Geography, Centre for Latin American Rseaerch and Documentation
Latin American urban development, urban deathscapes, intermediate cities, housing & belonging, architecture, Latin American transnational migrants
MP

Melina Patterson

University of Mary Washington
LP

Luc Pauwels

University of Antwerp, Belgium
MK

Megan K. Peppel

University of California Berkeley

Moderators
MP

Melina Patterson

University of Mary Washington

Thursday April 9, 2015 11:00am - 12:25pm
Cambridge (2nd floor)

12:25pm

1:30pm

TH1.30.00 ‘How to Get Published’: a Presentation for Early Career Researchers in Urban Studies
Kay McArdle is a Publisher of Geography, Planning and Development journals at Elsevier in Oxford, UK. She manages a portfolio of 20 academic journals in this disciplinary field.  During this session, Kay will talk you through the basics of getting your paper published in a journal.  Ideal for early career researchers and graduate students, the workshop guides you through all the essential stages of manuscript preparation, including background information on the publishing industry as a whole.  The majority of the session looks at manuscript structure, from your title and keywords, right through to the conclusion and references.  There will also be a brief introduction to using correct scholarly language – particularly useful for non-native English speakers.  By the end of the session, all the essential criteria will have been covered to make sure your paper can be a success!  There will be plenty of time for questions at the end. Kay will also be at the Book Exhibit – feel free to call by.

Presenters
avatar for Kay McArdle

Kay McArdle

Publisher - Geography, Planning & Development, Elsevier Ltd.
Publishing articles in an academic journal.

Moderators
avatar for Kay McArdle

Kay McArdle

Publisher - Geography, Planning & Development, Elsevier Ltd.
Publishing articles in an academic journal.

Thursday April 9, 2015 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Trinity (2nd floor)

1:30pm

TH1.30.03 Economic, Social, and Political Disruption in San Francisco
The San Francisco Bay Area is experiencing perhaps the most extreme version of the post-recession urban boom: unemployment has declined to just above 4 percent and venture capital (on the order of $7 billion in the second quarter of 2014 alone) and foreign direct investment (estimated at over $8 billion annually) has flowed into the region. At the same time, San Francisco has the fastest growing economic inequality in the country: the city’s housing market has exploded, eviction rates across the region have increased, and vulnerable neighborhoods face unprecedented threats of gentrification. Speakers will discuss these sweeping forces reshaping economic, social, and political relations in the city and region and the new forms of organizing and resistance that have emerged in the country’s “most liberal city.” This session brings together academics with community-based thinkers who are rooted in political organizing and investigative journalism.

Presenters
avatar for Rachel Brahinsky

Rachel Brahinsky

Assistant Professor, Urban Affairs, University of San Francisco
avatar for Corey Cook

Corey Cook

University of San Francisco
TR

Tim Redmond

48 Hills

Moderators
avatar for Corey Cook

Corey Cook

University of San Francisco

Thursday April 9, 2015 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Alhambra (2nd floor)

1:30pm

TH1.30.09 Expanding Interprofessional Behavioral Health Care through the Green Family Foundation Neighborhood Health Education Learning Program
This session will focus on the expansion of behavioral health care services in an innovative, curriculum-based program that addresses the health and socioeconomic needs of underserved populations through a household- based model of care. Through this program interprofessional teams of FIU medical, social work, law, nursing and education students have the opportunity to engage with and provide services to underserved households. Speakers will share their experiences of assessing and incorporating social determinants of health in an interdisciplinary behavioral healthcare practice environment. Speakers will also reflect on providing care to the uninsured and how behavioral health care has been integrated across all disciplines to improve the quality of life of the individual, household and neighborhood.

Presenters
EB

Eduardo B. Camps-Romero

Florida International University
BF

Beatrice Farnsworth

Florida International University
AG

Aisha Garba

Florida International University
AH

Annellys Hernandez

Florida International University

Moderators
EB

Eduardo B. Camps-Romero

Florida International University

Thursday April 9, 2015 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Cambridge (2nd floor)

1:30pm

TH1.30.20 Miami Thrives: Building a “Place-based Change” Community of Practice
This session will focus on the formation of Miami Thrives - a place-based change “community of practice” (CoP). Community groups throughout Miami are engaged in neighborhood “place-based” change and community development efforts often in isolation and disconnected from similar efforts just a few miles away. Miami Thrives is attempting to break down these geographic and professional silos to maximize shared learning and action. Practitioners representing organizations from different sectors (community development, education, public health, government, human services) around south Florida are coming together in a learning community to share their on-the-ground learning, to learn about innovative approaches, and to provide mutual support and joint action. The session will feature speakers and stories from the local communities of Overtown, Liberty City, the 79th Street corridor, East Little Havana, Miami Gardens, and Homestead/Florida City.

Presenters
GB

Gretchen Beesing

Catalyst Miami
avatar for Shekeria  Brown

Shekeria Brown

Executive Director, South Florida Community Development Coalition
Shekeria Brown is the Executive Director of South Florida Community Development Coalition, Inc. (SFCDC). She has spent most of her 14 year career in south Florida as an urban planner, practitioner and consultant focused on affordable housing, community and economic development. | | With extensive experience in grants compliance, she has administered over $100 million in state and federal grant funding allocated to local government for... Read More →
AS

Arden Shank

Neighborhood Housing Services of South Florida

Moderators
GB

Gretchen Beesing

Catalyst Miami

Thursday April 9, 2015 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Raphael (2nd floor)

1:30pm

TH1.30.01 Mixed Income Redevelopment and the Questions of Who Loses and Who Finds Community?
The questions of who loses and who finds community through mixed-income redevelopment are complicated ones. From the existing research we know that displacement from public housing, or displacement through other redevelopment initiatives to make way for mixed income housing, can compromise community-based social ties. But for which subgroups is it most salient? In the case of public housing transformation (HOPE VI) do the required community support services (CSS) help displaced residents establish new community ties? The other side of this is for original poor residents who remain in place – do they perceive being a part of the redeveloped community or do they stay in place and lose it while newcomers find it? This session explores these questions through a series of case studies of different cities during different time periods.
The Construction of Place and Displacement through Mixed-Income Development
Jim Fraser, Vanderbilt University

Stuck on the American Dream: Gendered Disadvantage and Getting out of Public Housing
Ashley Brown-Burns, Amherst College

Moving Stories: Reflections on Community and Social Ties among Public Housing Residents Awaiting Relocation
Kim Skobba, University of Georgia; Edward Goetz, University of Minnesota

Attitudes toward a New Permanent Housing Program For Vulnerable Youth: Results from a Randomized Community Survey
Dennis Watson, Indiana University

Presenters
AB

Ashley Brown-Burns

Amherst College
avatar for Jim Fraser

Jim Fraser

Associate Professor, Vanderbilt University
KS

Kim Skobba

University of Georgia
avatar for Dennis Watson

Dennis Watson

Assistant Professor, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis
My research and teaching interests include mental health, high risk populations and health behaviors, evaluation of health care programs and interventions, and community engaged research methods. Most of my work is at the intersection of mental health and homelessness.

Moderators
DO

Deirdre Oakley

Georgia State University

Thursday April 9, 2015 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Balmoral (2nd floor)

1:30pm

TH1.30.02 Informal Urbanism in North America (PART 2, Proposal for a two-panel session)
Informality in the Global North is receiving increasing attention. Urban informality has a long, forgotten history in these countries, including street vending and urban homesteading in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The resurgence of informal urbanism reflects the increasing precariousness of everyday life. Economic instability and social inequality fueled migration, day laboring, and sidewalk vending. Falling wages, economic restructuring, and rising living costs increased contingent work, homelessness, and informal housing practices. Municipal financial distress also encouraged the devolution of collective governance. In some circumstances, informality carries a countercultural cache as when taco trucks, pop-up beer gardens, and guerilla gardening become urban marketing tools. In all cases, informality has stimulated local re-regulation as cities respond to simultaneous demands to stop informal activity and to permit food trucks, vacation rentals and other informal practices. This organized, two-panel session explores the informal landscapes emerging in U.S., Canadian, and German cities. The first panel explains key characteristics of informal urbanism. What is it? Who does it? Where and how does informality thrive, and why? This panel explores these questions using in-depth studies of housing, food vending, and other informal practices in Chicago, New Orleans, Phoenix, Calgary, and Berlin. The second panel explores how informal practices interact with collective organizing and re-regulation. How do regulatory responses alter informal practices, and how does collective action surrounding informality shape new patterns of opportunity and inequality? Panel participants explore these questions using studies of urban policy reforms in New Orleans, Detroit, New York, Portland, and Chicago by policy makers who are attempting to make jurisdictional space for some informal practices within “mainstream” governance structures.


From Boardrooms to Goat Sheds: Self-Provisioning in Detroit
Kimberley Kinder, University of Michigan

“This is a lot like the Bronx, isn’t it?”: Informality in New York City
Evan Casper-Futterman, Rutgers University

Rethinking New Orleans a Decade after Katrina: Insurgent Planning in the Post-Disaster City
Jason Neville, Tulane University; Clara Irazábal, Columbia University

Presenters
avatar for Evan Casper-Futterman

Evan Casper-Futterman

Rutgers University
KK

Kimberley Kinder

University of Michigan
JN

Jason Neville

Tulane University

Moderators
KK

Kimberley Kinder

University of Michigan

Thursday April 9, 2015 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Gusman (lobby level)

1:30pm

TH1.30.04 'Choice' and Forced Housing Mobiliies
Moderator: Rachel Garshick Kleit,The Ohio State University

Alleged “Forthcoming Earthquakes” as Means to Urban Renewal: A Case Study into the Karapınar Valley Regeneration Project in Eskişehir, Turkey
Cansu Civelek, University of Vienna, Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropolgy

Factors Influencing Housing and Neighborhood Choice in Low-Income Neighborhoods: A Case Study of Linden, Ohio
Hayden Shelby, University of California, Berkeley

Examine the Determinants of Voucher Locational Outcomes
Ruoniu Wang, University of Florida; Abhinav Alakshendra,

Siting Affordable Housing in Neighborhoods of Opportunity: A Review of the Literature and an Assessment of Methodological Issues
Li Yin, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York; LaiYun Wu, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York; Kelly L. Patterson, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York; Robert M. Silverman, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York

Presenters
avatar for Cansu Civelek

Cansu Civelek

University of Vienna, Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropolgy
HS

Hayden Shelby

University of California, Berkeley
RW

Ruoniu Wang

University of Florida
LY

LI YIN

University at Buffalo, The State University of New York

Moderators
avatar for Rachel Garshick Kleit

Rachel Garshick Kleit

Professor, Ohio State University
I'm a researcher and urban planner interested in poverty reduction and the social impacts of housing on the lives of the poor.

Thursday April 9, 2015 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Windsor (2nd floor)

1:30pm

TH1.30.05 Race and Revanchism: Gentrification, Law-and-Order and the Spatial Politics of Hegemony
While scholars and commentators focus on general aspects of 'the great inversion' such as repopulated inner-cities and redevelopment projects, little attention has been paid to the hegemonic formations based on the overlapping political-economic forces of race, class, and space. Specifically, the emerging forms of urbanism and urbanization in diverse global cities in California have articulated concrete racial and class formations through the urban growth politics of gentrification. Through four empirically grounded and theoretically informed papers, this panel seeks to uncover the spatial politics of race and revanchism in the post-metropolitan context.


A Lighter Shade of Brown? Racial Formation and Middle-Class Mexican Americans in a Gentrifying Barrio
Alfredo Huante, USC

The Not-So-Quiet Encroachment of the Carnivalesque - Automobile Stunts, Moral Panics, and the Insurgency of Pleasure in a Revanchist City
Cesar Rodriguez, CSU San Marcos

Antonio Villaraigosa and His Uniforms of Brutality: The LAPD and its War on the Wretched of the City
Steven Osuna, UC Santa Barbara

Managing Metropolitan Migrants: Racial Power, Informality and Neoliberal Governance in Los Angeles
Daniel Olmos, CSU Channel Islands

Presenters
AH

Alfredo Huante

USC
Alfredo examines how race and racism interact with spatial and geographic aspects of urban development, particularly in Los Angeles. Broadly interested in race relations, racism, gentrification, economic development, and Latino urbanism.
avatar for Daniel Olmos

Daniel Olmos

CSU Channel Islands
Urban sociologist interrogating the nexus between migrant labor and neoliberal governmentality.
SO

Steven Osuna

UC Santa Barbara
avatar for Cesar Rodriguez

Cesar Rodriguez

Assistant Professor, CSU San Marcos
César Rodríguez is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at California State University, San Marcos. Originally from Daly City and South San Francisco, he has studied globalization through political economy, mass incarceration through history and geography, and culture through the disciplines of Chicana/o Studies and Black Studies. Generally, his work focuses on race, class & hegemony. In particular, he examines two prominent... Read More →

Moderators
avatar for Daniel Olmos

Daniel Olmos

CSU Channel Islands
Urban sociologist interrogating the nexus between migrant labor and neoliberal governmentality.

Thursday April 9, 2015 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Sandringham (2nd floor)

1:30pm

TH1.30.06 The racial dynamics of housing, wellbeing, and happiness
Moderator: Jacob Rugh, Brigham Young University

Do Residents Welcome Immigrants: A Survey of Residents in the City of Dayton
Jack Dustin, Wright State University

Racial Diversity and Happiness: Add Health Panel evidence
Adam Okulicz-Kozaryn, Rutgers-Camden

The Suburb Paradox: An Analysis of Black Households’ Adverse Experiences in St. Louis County, Missouri.
J. Walter Paquin, Bluffton University

Latino Disparities in Foreclosure: Using Original Data to Reconsider Cultural Affinity as Structural Disadvantage
Jacob Rugh, Brigham Young University; Ryan Allen, University of Minnesota; Conrad Ashby, Brigham Young University; Alejandra Bradford, Brigham Young University

Presenters
JD

Jack Dustin

Chair, Center Director, Associate Professor, Wright State University
AO

Adam Okulicz-Kozaryn

Rutgers-Camden
JW

J. Walter Paquin

Bluffton University
avatar for Jacob Rugh

Jacob Rugh

Assistant Professor, Brigham Young University

Moderators
avatar for Jacob Rugh

Jacob Rugh

Assistant Professor, Brigham Young University

Thursday April 9, 2015 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Escorial (2nd floor)

1:30pm

TH1.30.07 Civic and Youth Engagement in Urban Education
Moderator: Caroline Andrew, University of Ottawa

Focussing on Community to promote Post-Secondary Education among Marginalized Youth
Caroline Andrew, University of Ottawa; Vivien Runnels, University of Ottawa

Working together for urban school turnaround: Voices of teachers and parents, and next steps in bridging school and community for child- and family-wellbeing
Dorothy Knauer, Rutgers University Newark

Extracurricular Involvement and Student Dropout
Stephen Neely, University of South Florida

Student Voice: Exploration of a Youth Leadership Training Program
Thomas G. Reio, Florida International University; Chaundra L. Whitehead, Florida International University

Presenters
CA

Caroline Andrew

The University of Ottawa
DK

Dorothy Knauer

Rutgers University- Newark NJ
SN

Stephen Neely

University of South Florida
TR

Thomas Reio

Florida International University

Moderators
CA

Caroline Andrew

The University of Ottawa

Thursday April 9, 2015 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Star Isle (lobby level)

1:30pm

TH1.30.10 Obsolescence and Reappropriation in Urban Space
Moderator: Bethany Welch, Aquinas Center

Architecture and Affect: Diasporic Avatars Remake the Urban Imaginary in Metro Phoenix
Kristin Koptiuch, Arizona State University

Sanctuaries along Streets: The Spatial Appropriations of Storefront Churches in a Central City Neighborhood
Asha Kutty, University of Missouri, Columbia

Interstate Migrations Obsolescence, Adaptation, and the Globalization of the Dead Mall
Gregory Marinic, University of Houston, College of Architecture

Presenters
avatar for Kristin Koptiuch

Kristin Koptiuch

Associate Professor of Anthropology, Arizona State University-West campus
AK

Asha Kutty

University of Missouri, Columbia
GM

Gregory Marinic

University of Houston, College of Architecture

Moderators
avatar for Bethany Welch

Bethany Welch

Director, Aquinas Center
Dr. Bethany Welch is the founding director of Aquinas Center in Philadelphia as well as a nonprofit management and evaluation consultant. The center is housed in a former convent re-purposed as a space to foster mutual support and shared understanding on the grounds of a diverse, inner city Catholic parish. Parishioners and guests come together to practice hospitality, promote education, and engage in service. The project is a direct result of... Read More →

Thursday April 9, 2015 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Crandon (lobby level)

1:30pm

TH1.30.12 Rethinking China's Peri-urban Politics
Amid China's continuing settlement transition and the emergence of national policy regimes such as Urban-Rural Coordination and the Plan for a New Form of Urbanization, the relationship between urban and rural has become an increasing focus of Chinese planning and policy. In particular, the intersections of these two realms--zones of peri-urbanity and urban-rural integration--have been dramatically transformed and hotly contested. This panel approaches peri-urbanity as both a spatial and an institutional condition of marginality. In China, such marginality is produced by various institutions of urban-rural distinction, including household registration, land management, and state and collective governance. While peri-urbanity is conventionally understood as the lateral intersection of urban and rural territories, institutional marginality can produce peri-urbanity in diverse socio-spatial arrangements, including the subterranean, the archipelagic, and the regional. Combining disciplinary perspectives from planning, political science, anthropology, and geography, the panel addresses the production, contestation, and exploitation of these diverse conditions of peri-urbanity in contemporary China. Kyle Jaros investigates how China’s provincial governments are using the banner of new-style urbanization to accelerate peri-urban development and extend their administrative reach. Annette Kim explores Beijing's evolving market for bomb-shelter housing as the identity of migrants are increasingly marginalized in social discourse. Yuan Xiao looks at how China's land quota markets draw resources away from rural areas and reinforce the imbalances between big and small cities. And Nick Smith considers efforts to fund rural development by transforming China's peri-urban villages into real estate developers.


‘New-style urbanization’ or metropolitanization?: The case of China’s Xi-Xian New Area
Kyle Jaros, Harvard Kennedy School

Excavating the Subterranean City: the living conditions, livelihood strategies, and governance of Beijing’s underground housing population
Annette M. Kim, University of Southern California

Making Land Fly: The Institutionalization of China’s Land Quota Markets and Its Implications for Rural-Urban Relations
Yuan Xiao, Columbia Law School

Village-as-the-City: Turning China’s Villages into Real Estate Developers
Nick R. Smith, Harvard University

Presenters
KJ

Kyle Jaros

Harvard Kennedy School
AM

Annette M. Kim

University of Southern California
avatar for Nick R. Smith

Nick R. Smith

PhD Candidate, Yale-NUS College
YX

Yuan Xiao

Columbia Law School

Moderators
avatar for Nick R. Smith

Nick R. Smith

PhD Candidate, Yale-NUS College

Thursday April 9, 2015 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Palm Isle (lobby level)

1:30pm

TH1.30.13 'Creating' land: The reuse of vacant and low-density urban spaces
Moderator: Claire Poitras, INRS

Land banking and reuse of properties
Jae Teuk Chin, Saint Louis University

The Economic Impact of Converting Vacant Urban Land to Maintained Greenspace
Kevin Gillen, Fels Institute of Government at the University of Pennsylvania

The Spatial Distribution of Vacant Land in Growing Cities
Boah Kim, Texas A&M University; Galen Newman, Texas A&M University

New Life for Taxpayer Strips
Andrew Whittemore, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Presenters
JT

Jae Teuk Chin

Saint Louis University
KG

Kevin Gillen

Fels Institute of Government at the University of Pennsylvania
BK

Boah Kim

Texas A&M University
AW

Andrew Whittemore

University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Moderators
CP

Claire Poitras

Institut national de la recherche scientifique - Urbanisation Culture Société

Thursday April 9, 2015 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Godfrey (lobby level)

1:30pm

TH1.30.14 Internal Structural Inequality in Cities
Moderator: Elizabeth J. Mueller, University of Texas at Austin

Medellín Urban Forums: Transnational assemblages of hegemonic and counter-hegemonic narratives

John Betancur, University of Illinois at Chicago, Catalina Ortiz, National University of Colombia
Greenwashing: Throwing Sustainability Out With the Bathwater? The Displacement of Informal Settlements Through Green Development in Fortaleza, Brazil
Annie Contractor, University of Illinois; Andrew Greenlee, University of Illinois

Cradle of Crime: the deterioration of inner Mexico City and its surrounding areas
Gabriel Morales Sod, New York University

Presenters
JJ

John J Betancur

Department of Urban Planning and Policy (UPP), University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC)
avatar for Annie Contractor

Annie Contractor

Graduate Student, University of Illinois
I will complete my master's degree in urban planning in May for which I have focused on social justice in an international context. I am especially interested in gender and racial equity in urban planning, and how those issues play out in small urban settings. Planning with and for alternatives to continuous growth is a way forward I would like to explore with others. | | Link to my full paper... Read More →
GM

Gabriel Morales Sod

New York University, department of sociology

Moderators
EJ

Elizabeth J. Mueller

University of Texas

Thursday April 9, 2015 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Hibiscus (lobby level)

1:30pm

TH1.30.15 Place-based leadership: A route to progressive change?
Some scholars argue that the scope for exercising urban, or place-based, leadership is trivial. Commentators adopting a neo-liberal perspective argue that the need for localities to compete in the international market place means that civic leaders are now best seen as servants of private capital. Place-less power, not local democracy, now determines city futures. This international panel, by drawing on recent research on progressive place-based leadership in Europe, North America and elsewhere, questions this perspective. It will explore the changing nature of place-based leadership in our rapidly globalising world, and will consider whether, in fact, the place-less forces of global capital can be resisted. The papers presented examine the possibilities for local communities and civic leaders to articulate and implement priorities for policy and action that reflect local preferences. By examining examples of bold, civic leadership in different national contexts, the panel considers ways in which progressive urban leaders – at the very local as well as at the city and city region scale – can contribute to the development of more people-friendly, more inclusive cities. The panel will also share ideas on the changing nature of multi-level leadership in the modern city, and will consider the way that international policy exchange is contributing to debates about urban leadership.


Analysing change in urban political leadership: Does introducing a mayoral form of governance make a difference?
David Sweeting, University of Bristol; Robin Hambleton, University of the West of England, Bristol

"Influencing the Influencers": Civic leadership and collaborative governance in the Greater Toronto area
Allison Bramwell, University of North Carolina, Greensboro

Place-based leadership: A Canadian multi-level policy perspective
Neil Bradford, Huron University College, Western University

Place-based leadership and urban innovation: The unsung drivers of progressive change in the modern era
Robin Hambleton, University of the West of England, Bristol

Presenters
NB

Neil Bradford

Western University
AB

Allison Bramwell

University of North Carolina, Greensboro
avatar for Robin Hambleton

Robin Hambleton

Professor of City Leadership, University of the West of England, Bristol
I am interested in understanding the power of local, place-based civic leadership in our globalizing world. I have a new international book out on 'Leading the Inclusive City. Place-based innovation for a bounded planet' (Policy Press). The UAA is always a great place for international exchange relating to new ideas in the broad field of progressive urban politics... the San Diego conference will be no exception!
DS

David Sweeting

University of Bristol, UK

Moderators
avatar for Robin Hambleton

Robin Hambleton

Professor of City Leadership, University of the West of England, Bristol
I am interested in understanding the power of local, place-based civic leadership in our globalizing world. I have a new international book out on 'Leading the Inclusive City. Place-based innovation for a bounded planet' (Policy Press). The UAA is always a great place for international exchange relating to new ideas in the broad field of progressive urban politics... the San Diego conference will be no exception!

Thursday April 9, 2015 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Flagler (lobby level)

1:30pm

TH1.30.16 Fiscal Crises and Austerity: Impacts and Policy Responses
Moderator: Gary A. Mattson, Master of Public Administration Program, University of Northern Kentucky

Great Recession, Urban Austerity and City Services
Yunji Kim, Cornell University; Mildred Warner, Cornell University

Fiscal Stress and Financial Management Practices of Inner-Ring Midwest Suburan Towns
Gary A. Mattson, Master of Public Administration Program, University of Northern Kentucky

Contracting back in: From What? And Why? Portuguese Case of Municipal Enterprises.
Miguel Rodrigues, CIDE - México

Tax Cap, Fiscal Austerity and New York Cities
Mildred Warner, Cornell University; Yuanshuo Xu, Cornell University

Presenters
YK

Yunji Kim

Cornell University
GA

Gary A. Mattson

Master of Public Administration Program, University of Northern Kentucky
avatar for Miguel Rodrigues

Miguel Rodrigues

Polytechnic Institute of Bragança
YX

Yuanshuo Xu

Cornell University

Moderators
GA

Gary A. Mattson

Master of Public Administration Program, University of Northern Kentucky

Thursday April 9, 2015 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Tuttle (lobby level)

1:30pm

TH1.30.17 Empowerment / Enterprise / zones strategies: What works?
Moderator: TBA

Results Matter: Evaluating the Outcomes of the Empowerment Zones Designated in Round Three
Ljubinka Andonoska, University of Texas at El Paso

Identifying Local Industry Clusters and Shifts in the Round II Urban Empowerment Zones
Agatha S. Caraballo, Florida International University

Does Federal Grants to Stabilize Communities Work? Evidence from the Neighborhood Stabilization Programs from 2008 to 2010
Hyun Kyong (Rosa) Lee, George Washington University; Kyujin Jung, University of North Texas

Evaluating Performance and Integrity of Participants in Enterprise Zone Tax Credit Programs
Mel Powell, Southern Maryland Higher Education Center

Do access points have relevance in today’s economy?
Jennifer Ratliff, University of San Francisco

Presenters
LA

Ljubinka Andonoska

Assistant Professor, University of Texas at El Paso
avatar for Agatha S. Caraballo

Agatha S. Caraballo

Digital Instructor, Florida International University
avatar for Hyun Kyong (Rosa) Lee

Hyun Kyong (Rosa) Lee

Research Assistant, George Washington Institute of Public Policy (GWIPP)
Rosa Lee is a third-year doctoral student in the Trachtenberg School of Public Policy and Public Administration. Her main interests lie in urban and metropolitan governance, economic development planning, regional equity and economic resilience, and the role of the middle class for growth.
JR

Jennifer Ratliff

University of San Francisco


Thursday April 9, 2015 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Dupont (lobby level)

1:30pm

TH1.30.18 Transformation of Miami’s Urban Core
This panel will discuss the transformation of the urban core of Miami, focusing on five different aspects of the inner city revitalization process in Miami. The first aspect is the inter-government relationships at the local level, which affected the political and administrative context in which economic revitalization of the urban core of Miami occurred. The second aspect is the development of the urban infrastructure and built environment in the urban core, particularly with reference to infrastructure needs in inner city Miami. The third aspect deals with minority business formation in Miami. This aspect will especially focus on the Black owned businesses and the policy context in which they have evolved. The fourth aspect is housing, which will focus on the structural inequalities due to inner-city housing policies, poverty, and predominance of female headed households. The last aspect is the inner city health, focusing specifically on health disparities and community based solutions. The panel is novel in terms of coverage of the breadth of issues related to inner core of a city. The panelists are authors of chapters of a proposed book on transformation of the Miami’s urban core.

Infrastructure Policy and Urban Transformation in Miami
Ramon Trias, Florida International University

Role of the Black Micro Businesses in Transforming Miami’s Urban Core
Nicki Fraser, Florida International University

Transformation of Housing and Intersectional Challenges in Black Miami
Sebawit Bishu, Florida International University

Presenters
SB

Sebawit Bishu

Florida International University
avatar for Nicki Fraser

Nicki Fraser

FIU Public Admin Ph.D. student/NSF Fellow, Florida International University
RT

Ramon Trias

Florida International University

Moderators
avatar for Nicki Fraser

Nicki Fraser

FIU Public Admin Ph.D. student/NSF Fellow, Florida International University

Thursday April 9, 2015 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Michelangelo (2nd floor)

1:30pm

TH1.30.19 Starving Cities: Issues of Food Security in Urban Areas
Moderator: Joan Wesley, Jackson State University

“It's Gonna Be a Process for Me”: Avenues for Behavior Change at a New Supermarket in a Former Food Desert
Benjamin W. Chrisinger, University of Pennsylvania

The food may grow but the city is starving’ – a critical evaluation of urban agriculture policies from a South African perspective on social dynamics
Matthias Fleischer, University of Mainz

Manna in the Desert: Food Insecurity in Little Rock, Arkansas
Stacy Moak, University of Arkansas at Little Rock; Jeff Walker, University of Arkansas at Little Rock; Rick Dierenfeldt, University of Arkansas at Little Rock

Assessing the Nutritional Environment of Cities in the Jackson, MS Metropolitan Statistical Area
Joan Wesley, Jackson State University; Sophia Leggett, Jackson State University; Mary Manogin, Jackson State University

Presenters
avatar for Ben Chrisinger

Ben Chrisinger

PhD Candidate, University of Pennsylvania
MF

Matthias Fleischer

University of Mainz
SM

Stacy Moak

University of Arkansas at Little Rock
JW

Joan Wesley

Jackson State University

Moderators
JW

Joan Wesley

Jackson State University

Thursday April 9, 2015 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Oxford (2nd floor)

2:55pm

3:15pm

TH3.15.00 Urban Trends in Central & South America and the Caribbean: Poverty. Discussion on a research agenda
This session will focus on current trends in Central and South America and the Caribbean in relation to key variables of this highly urbanized region. Current issues involve, among other themes, right to the city, accessibility, poverty, inequality, housing realities, and microfinancing both for business and housing. Speakers will present their insights from a diverse body of research and actual engagement in specific projects in the region.  Sustainability research and current policies will frame the conversation of the urban agenda. Discussion is also expected to address the variety of approaches on state interventions in the region: from strong state intervention to more market-driven policies. Labor markets and migration, both national and international, are also to inform the Latin America urban discussion.

 

Presenters
LC

Lucia Capanema-Alvares

professor, Universidade Federal Fluminense
JL

Janina Leon

Catholic University, Lima Peru
avatar for Maria Soledad Arqueros Mejica

Maria Soledad Arqueros Mejica

University of Buenos Aires, Argentina
AS

Ana Sabogal

Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú

Moderators
CG

Cecilia Giusti

Texas A&M University

Thursday April 9, 2015 3:15pm - 4:40pm
Cambridge (2nd floor)

3:15pm

TH3.15.03 Community Information: A Quarter-Century of Innovation
A recent Urban Institute book, Strengthening Communities with Neighborhood Data, relates the progress since the mid-1990s in the development and use of community indicators to make better local decisions and motivate broader social change. The book discusses the advances underlying the trend: in institutions, data and technology, community applications, and research methods. The authors draw in part on the lessons from the National Neighborhood Indicators Partnership, a network of local organizations in three dozen cities that collect, organize, and use neighborhood data to tackle issues in their communities. The panelists will share their perspectives on the future of the community information field and what we should be collectively working on to improve practice and research to understand and improve our neighborhoods. Tom Kingsley and Kathy Pettit, two authors of the book, will provide an overview of the community information field and national perspective on local use of neighborhood data. The conversation will be grounded in case studies from three very different cities. Lisa Nelson will talk about how Cuyahoga County’s NEO CANDO system, a remarkable parcel-level data system maintained by Case Western University, moved from a useful tool for a few government agencies and community development practitioners to an essential one for widespread users. Meg Merrick will tell the story of Portland State University’s local indicators work, starting with the use of the Regional Equity Atlas by local advocates to influence regional greenspace policy and change funding mechanisms to enable targeting to park-deficient areas in low income and minority communities. She’ll also draw on comparisons with their later indicators work on Greater Portland Pulse. Sabina Deitrick will discuss her experiences at the University Center for Social and Urban Research in providing data for neighborhoods up to the region and in serving as a catalyst and hub for open data.

Presenters
avatar for Sabina Deitrick

Sabina Deitrick

University of Pittsburgh
GT

G. Thomas Kingsley

The Urban Institute
avatar for Meg Merrick

Meg Merrick

Research Associate, Institute of Portland Metropolitan Studies, PSU
LN

Lisa Nelson

Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland
avatar for Kathy Pettit

Kathy Pettit

Senior Reesearch Associate, The Urban Institute

Moderators
avatar for Kathy Pettit

Kathy Pettit

Senior Reesearch Associate, The Urban Institute

Thursday April 9, 2015 3:15pm - 4:40pm
Sandringham (2nd floor)

3:15pm

TH3.15.06 Place Matters: Poverty, Policy, and Politics in the Modern Metropolis
The 3rd edition of Place Matters: Metropolitics for the Twenty-First Century was published in 2014. Two of the three co-authors will participate in the colloquy, laying out the main arguments of the book and its political program for addressing spatial inequalities in metropolitan areas. The other participants will then critically address the arguments of the book, addressing questions such as: 1. Are spatial inequalities a significant cause of rising economic inequality and do they worsen the effects of inequality? 2. Do we know enough about the contextual effects of concentrated poverty to make poverty deconcentration and building mixed-income communities high priorities in public policies? 3. What is the relationship between racial segregation and class segregation? 4. How has the suburbanization of poverty changed the causes and effects of concentrated poverty? 5. What policies at the federal, state, and regional level are needed to build more mixed-income communities that support equal opportunity and upward mobility? 6. What new institutions, if any, are needed in metropolitan areas? 7. Do regional institutions run the risk of disempowering minority communities in central cities and, if so, what can be done about this? 8. What are the prospects for city-suburban coalitions to address metropolitan inequalities? The colloquy will leave as much time as possible to engage the audience in the debate over the causes, consequences, and solutions to inequalities rooted in place.

Presenters
JD

James DeFilippis

Rutgers University
ES

Elizabeth Strom

University of South Florida
TS

Todd Swanstrom

University of Missouri-St. Louis
PT

Phil Thompson

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Moderators
TS

Todd Swanstrom

University of Missouri-St. Louis

Thursday April 9, 2015 3:15pm - 4:40pm
Raphael (2nd floor)

3:15pm

TH3.15.10 Design, Activism and Research
The colloquy is part of the special track on activism, organized by Kitty Kelly Epstein and Barbara Ferman, and inspired by their 2014 workshop in San Antonio. Within this track, the "Design, Activism and Research" colloquy focuses on investigating--both theoretically and via case study analysis--two key aspects in the context of urban affairs. One is illuminate an understanding of each of the terms: "design," "activism" and "research," while the second is to articulate different types of relationships between the three terms. The idea is to acknowledge, but also transcend conventional and limited notions of design, activism and research. The short presentations and discussions will be led by four scholars who have pursued these themes in their academic and activist pursuits. The scholars represent different disciplinary backgrounds [i.e. architecture, environmental psychology, landscape architecture, urbanism] as well as a range of geographical engagements [i.e. Rio de Janeiro, New York City, Seattle, Sao Paulo]. Each of the scholars will critically reflect upon theoretical framings of the terms as well upon the projects they are directly engaged in. Each presentation will end with 1 or 2 thoughtful questions to segue into the discussion portion of the colloquy. The audience will be divided into smaller groups around each set of questions in order to have a more focused and in-depth discussion. There are multiple goals for this colloquy: (a) for each presenter to critically reflect upon and articulate the ways in which design, activism and research overlap and intersect in their own work, (b) to generate a set of questions that reflect the contingent quality of this work and ongoing challenges, and (c) to partner with the audience to generate deeper insights and future strategies.

Presenters
HC

Hillary Caldwell

City University of New York
avatar for Jeffrey Hou

Jeffrey Hou

Professor and Chair, University of Washington
Jeffrey Hou is Professor and Chair of Landscape Architecture at the University of Washington in Seattle. His work focuses on design activism, public space, cross-cultural placemaking, and engagement of marginalized social groups in planning and design. He is the editor of Insurgent Public Space: Guerrilla Urbanism and the Remaking of Contemporary Cities (2010) and Transcultural Cities: Border-Crossing and Placemaking (2013), and most recently... Read More →
avatar for Aseem Inam

Aseem Inam

Director, TRULAB: Laboratory for Designing Urban Transformation, The New School
Aseem Inam is Associate Professor of Urbanism at The New School in New York City and Fellow at the Center of Ethics and Transformative Values at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is the author of two peer-reviewed books, Planning for the Unplanned: Recovering from Crises in Megacities, and Designing Urban Transformation. He is also the author of several journal articles and book chapters on the institutional dynamics of... Read More →
MT

Marat Troina

Federal University of Rio de Janeiro

Moderators
avatar for Aseem Inam

Aseem Inam

Director, TRULAB: Laboratory for Designing Urban Transformation, The New School
Aseem Inam is Associate Professor of Urbanism at The New School in New York City and Fellow at the Center of Ethics and Transformative Values at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is the author of two peer-reviewed books, Planning for the Unplanned: Recovering from Crises in Megacities, and Designing Urban Transformation. He is also the author of several journal articles and book chapters on the institutional dynamics of... Read More →

Thursday April 9, 2015 3:15pm - 4:40pm
Hibiscus (lobby level)

3:15pm

TH3.15.20 Getting Tenure/Promotion I--Teaching/Service Strategies.
Transition to a tenure track position in higher education is often filled with stumbling blocks. One challenge is the transition from a focus on research (as a PhD student) to the three legged stool of research, teaching, and service. The process of managing these demands can be quite daunting and new Assistant Professors feel out of balance. This colloquy will discuss strategies for successfully maneuvering the landscape of research, teaching, and service. Panelist will provide strategies and engage in dialogue regarding pitfalls to be avoided during the tenure process in relation to teaching and service. Topics to be addressed include mentorship, use of technology, peer and student teaching evaluations, new course preps, types of service, and good department citizenship.

Presenters
AC

Andy Carswell

University of Georgia
DP

David Perry

University of Illinois at Chicago
MS

Mara Sidney

Rutgers University-Newark
avatar for Jocelyn Taliaferro

Jocelyn Taliaferro

Associate Professor & Director of The Graduate Program, North Carolina State University
If you only look at what is, you might never attain what could be!

Moderators
avatar for Jocelyn Taliaferro

Jocelyn Taliaferro

Associate Professor & Director of The Graduate Program, North Carolina State University
If you only look at what is, you might never attain what could be!

Thursday April 9, 2015 3:15pm - 4:40pm
Trinity (2nd floor)

3:15pm

TH3.15.19 Community-Based Research Partnerships for Preventing Health Risks among Urban Young Adults
Urban research universities are interested in building community research partnerships for advancing health promotion. Florida International University (FIU) is a large Hispanic-serving institution (HSI) located in Miami-Dade. FIU and Miami-Dade fall within a High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area, Miami-Dade is first in the nation in AIDS case rates, and Florida has seen a steady rise in the incidence of HCV among young adults. The SAMHSA-funded “Miami-Dade Partnership for Preventing Health Risks among Young Adults” brings together FIU and two Miami-based CBOs, Union Positiva, and Spectrum Programs, to reduce substance abuse, HIV/AIDS, and hepatitis C among Hispanic young adults. Strategies to facilitate academic-community collaboration include: 1) integrating data from a number of sources; 2) involving community members in research activities; 3) creating interdisciplinary research teams; 4) balancing research and action; and 5) implementing culturally tailored evidence-based practices. The Miami-Dade Partnership has received cross-organizational support from both staff and senior administration; both are critical for our efforts to succeed. Three years of SAMHSA funding further solidify the importance of all partner contributions. Early project phases have included: 1) a university-community needs assessment; 2) development of a strategic plan for prevention needs among Hispanic young adults; 3) selection of culturally appropriate evidence-based prevention strategies; and 4) formative research among both university and community leaders and stakeholders. These early phases will serve to inform subsequent health promotion efforts, which will include health screening, point-of-care HIV/HCV testing and counseling, normative and environmental changes, and a media advocacy/awareness campaign. Preliminary results suggest that academic-community partnerships prove successful in advancing health promotion agendas in urban communities.

Presenters
SF

Sofia Fernandez

Project Coordinator, Doctoral Student, Florida International University
JG

Juliette Graziano

Spectrum Programs, Inc.
MH

Michelle Hospital

Florida International University
avatar for Melissa Howard

Melissa Howard

Assistant Professor, FIU
EW

Eric Wagner

Florida International University

Moderators
EW

Eric Wagner

Florida International University

Thursday April 9, 2015 3:15pm - 4:40pm
Oxford (2nd floor)

3:15pm

TH3.15.01 Housing Policies in the Global South: Innovative versus Traditional Approaches
Given vast differences in governance systems and the context of urbanization, a variety of approaches to addressing housing challenges is expected. From land sharing schemes in Cambodia, to inclusionary zoning in Indonesia, to the housing provident fund in China, a multitude of innovations in housing policies have potential benefits outside their country of origin. In order to bring a comparative lens to the topic and critically assess policies' potential transferability, the International Journal of Housing Policy (IJHP) is sponsoring a panel at the UAA conference in Miami on Housing Policy Innovations in the Global South. The panel is composed of five papers that address issues with housing policies across Asia; Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, the Philippines and Thailand. Two papers focus on the successes and challenges of traditional approaches to housing policy in China; expanding standard housing finance systems through a provident fund and requiring local governments to provide subsidized public housing units to low-income households. Two papers focus on the community based lending approach in Cambodia, advocated for by the Asian Coalition for Housing Rights, providing insight into the potential and limits of this bottom-up approach. Finally, a broad, comparative paper that covers community-based programs in four countries questions the focus on innovation in housing policy and proposes effectiveness as a more important criterion. The panel’s combination of papers focused on traditional or top-down approaches, with studies of new, innovative approaches as well as a broad comparative piece will create a fruitful discussion on the important topic of housing policy in the Global South.


Housing Provident Fund Program in China: Successes and Challenges
Lan Deng, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; Jie Chen, Shanghai University of Finance and Economics

The collateral effects of Borei Keila's land-sharing and its significance in the formulation of a Cambodian National Housing Policy
Giorgio Talocci, University College London; Camillo Boano, University College London

Is Innovative also Effective? Recent Efforts for Housing the Urban Poor in Asia
Ashok Das, University of Hawaii at Manoa

Presenters
AD

Ashok Das

University of Hawai'i at Manoa
avatar for Lan Deng

Lan Deng

Associate Professor, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
GT

Giorgio Talocci

University College London

Moderators
PM

Paavo Monkkonen

University of California, Los Angeles

Thursday April 9, 2015 3:15pm - 4:40pm
Windsor (2nd floor)

3:15pm

TH3.15.02 Cross-National Issues in Low Income Subsidized Housing
Moderator: Montserrat Pareja-Eastaway, University of Barcelona


The changing face of subsidized housing in Manitoba, Canada
Sarah Cooper, University of Illinois-Chicago

Urban dynamics and regeneration: housing, gentrification and tourism at La Barceloneta, Spain.
Montserrat Pareja-Eastaway, University of Barcelona

Middle Class “House-Slaves” and Property Rights in Neoliberal Shanghai, China
Lei Ping, The New School University

Socioeconomic impacts of land titling: A case study of Quinta do Caju, Rio de Janeiro
Laurie Tallotte, Université de Montréal; Danielle Labbé, Université de Montréal

Presenters
SC

Sarah Cooper

University of Illinois-Chicago
avatar for Montserrat Pareja-Eastaway

Montserrat Pareja-Eastaway

Associate Professor, University of Barcelona
LP

Lei Ping

Assistant Professor of China Studies, The New School University
LT

Laurie Tallotte

Université de Montréal

Moderators
avatar for Montserrat Pareja-Eastaway

Montserrat Pareja-Eastaway

Associate Professor, University of Barcelona

Thursday April 9, 2015 3:15pm - 4:40pm
Balmoral (2nd floor)

3:15pm

TH3.15.04 Trends in Community Development
Moderator: David Swindell, Arizona State University

Neighborhood characteristics and the location of HUD subsidized housing in shrinking cities: An analysis to inform anchor-based urban revitalization strategies
Robert Silverman, University at Buffalo; Kelly Patterson, University at Buffalo; Li Yin, University at Buffalo; Laiyun Wu, University at Buffalo

Community-Centered Research in Urban Neighborhoods: University Partnerships and Embedded Research

Robyne Stevenson, Ph.D., University of Central Florida; Atalie Ashley-West, University of Central Florida, Vierne Placide, University of Central Florida

Neighborhood Level Decision Authority as a Lure for Greater Citizen Engagement
David Swindell, Arizona State University

Presenters
avatar for Robert Silverman

Robert Silverman

Professor and PhD Program Director, University at Buffalo
Rob Silverman's research focuses on the non-profit sector, the role of community-based organizations in urban neighborhoods, education reform, and inequality in inner city housing markets. His current research projects include studies of non-profit finance and advocacy,school reform,shrinking cities, and fair housing.
avatar for Robyne Stevenson

Robyne Stevenson

Visiting Professor, University of Central Florida
I am a pracademic, focused on urban community development and issues related to oppression.
avatar for David Swindell

David Swindell

Director, Center for Urban Innovation, Arizona State University
David Swindell is the Director of the Center for Urban Innovation and an associate professor in the School of Public Affairs at Arizona State University. His work focuses primarily on community and economic development, especially public financing of sports facilities, the contribution of sports facilities to the economic development of urban space, alternative financing mechanisms for smart city investments, as well as collaborative arrangements... Read More →

Moderators
avatar for David Swindell

David Swindell

Director, Center for Urban Innovation, Arizona State University
David Swindell is the Director of the Center for Urban Innovation and an associate professor in the School of Public Affairs at Arizona State University. His work focuses primarily on community and economic development, especially public financing of sports facilities, the contribution of sports facilities to the economic development of urban space, alternative financing mechanisms for smart city investments, as well as collaborative arrangements... Read More →

Thursday April 9, 2015 3:15pm - 4:40pm
Alhambra (2nd floor)

3:15pm

TH3.15.05 On Poverty and Race, Do We Still Have Little to Say? Why Race-Oriented Research is Peripheral in Urban Studies Scholarship
At the height of the “urban crisis” of the 1970s and 1980s, a considerable amount of research was generated that focused on the racialized roots of urban economic inequality and residential segregation, and the policy options that could mitigate both. In the years since, cities have physically and economically rebounded while the circumstances of the populations at the heart of the urban crisis remaining the same or worsened. This panel is organized around the provocative indictment lodged by Chester Hartman in his classic 1994 essay, “On Poverty and Race We Have Had Little to Say” and the perspective that research on that focuses on the resulting manifestations of racial inequality in urban areas has eclipsed research on the causes of race inequality in them. This panel seeks to contribute to the reinvigoration of a clear focus on racial inequalities and injustices by the fields of urban studies generally and planning specifically by interrogating how and why urban studies and planning scholarship moved race to the periphery.


On Poverty and Race: The Silenced Cacophony
Anna Brand, University of New Orleans

Race, Racism, and Urban Planning: Lots to say, but missing the point.
Lisa Bates, Portland State University; Jamaal Green, Portland State University

Reproducing the Revanchist Imaginary: A Critical Analysis of Race in Gentrification Scholarship
Katherine Fallon, University of Wisconsin, Madison

Silence or Weakness? Race and Urban Scholarship in a Post-Ferguson World
Alex Schafran, University of Leeds/University of Colorado-Denver

Presenters
avatar for Lisa Bates

Lisa Bates

Portland State University
AL

Anna Livia Brand

University of New Orleans
KF

Katherine Fallon

University of Wisconsin, Madison
AS

Alex Schafran

University of Leeds/University of Colorado-Denver

Moderators
AS

Alex Schafran

University of Leeds/University of Colorado-Denver

Thursday April 9, 2015 3:15pm - 4:40pm
Escorial (2nd floor)

3:15pm

TH3.15.07 Urban Education: Impacts of Social and Policy Changes
Moderator: Vladimir Kogan, Ohio State University

The Hidden Costs: How School Closing Affects Students in Philadelphia
Jerusha Conner, Villanova University

The New Concentration of Poverty: Implications for Educational Achievement
Paul A. Jargowsky, Rutgers - Camden; Adam Okulicz-Kozaryn, Rutgers - Camden

The Consequences of Direct Democracy: A Dynamic Regression Discontinuity Analysis of School Tax Referenda and Student Achievement
Vladimir Kogan, Ohio State University; Stephane Lavertu, Ohio State University; Zachary Peskowitz, Ohio State University

Presenters
JC

Jerusha Conner

Villanova University
avatar for Paul A. Jargowsky

Paul A. Jargowsky

Director, Center for Urban Research and Education, Rutgers University - Camden
VK

Vladimir Kogan

Ohio State University

Moderators
VK

Vladimir Kogan

Ohio State University

Thursday April 9, 2015 3:15pm - 4:40pm
Star Isle (lobby level)

3:15pm

TH3.15.08 New Approaches to Fostering and Sustaining Community Change
Building on the long history of community organizing and the more recent comprehensive community building, new approaches are emerging as practitioners promote social capital and networking as central mechanisms for promoting change. This practical session will begin with a theoretical framework for integrating community building, organizing and conflict transformation. Change agents describe three specific case studies in which they developed distinct models to foster and sustain community change. In one case, the theory suggested that a community organizer was needed to sustain the change in an Arab community in northern Israel after the NGO pulled back, which proved to be unfounded as the community thrived despite the lack of a dedicated organizer. In another case, an initiative adapted asset based community development and network centric organizing (based on Lawrence Community Works) to create a vibrant network that facilitates wealth building in disadvantaged neighborhoods surrounding a university and several other anchor institutions. A third case applies the social capital approach to the young adult communities’ movement in Israel, Nepal and Berundi as a means for urban regeneration. Across these case studies, community change centers around promoting social capital, facilitating residents in solving immediate issues that concern them while at the same time working to address long-term structural problems. These promising models have gained a lot of attention but have yet to appear in published literature.


A Three-Fold Cord: Integrating Community Building, Organizing and Conflict Transformation in Community Change
Mark Chupp, Case Western Reserve University

Young Adult Communities as a Lever for Urban Regeneration
Sara Shadmi-Wortman, Shdemot Center for Community Leadership

Can Activism Survive Without a Community Organizer? A case study from an Arab community in Israel
Ido Shelem, Bridge to the Future

Presenters
avatar for Mark Chupp

Mark Chupp

Assistant Professor, Case Western Reserve University
I have been on a vision quest throughout my career, seeking to build community across identity groups. I spent years as a practitioner in community building, community organizing and conflict transformation. Social work provided the strongest theoretical and practice foundation for this work. I pursued this quest for community-led social change in both my social work practice and studies. Having initiated several change movements and nonprofit... Read More →
avatar for Sara Shadmi-Wortman

Sara Shadmi-Wortman

Founder and Director of Development, Shdemot Center for Community Leadership-Oranim Academic College of Education
avatar for Ido Shelem

Ido Shelem

CEO and Founder, Bridge to the Future
Ido Shelem is the CEO and Founder of Bridge to the Future. He is lawyer turned community entrepreneur. Ido is a former strategic adviser to government departments, leading businesses and foreign governments. He specializes in developing effective methods for developing strong communities in Israel’s border communities (its periphery).Talk to Ido about: community change, measurement and evaluation, innovation and entrepreneurship, building trust... Read More →

Moderators
avatar for Mark Chupp

Mark Chupp

Assistant Professor, Case Western Reserve University
I have been on a vision quest throughout my career, seeking to build community across identity groups. I spent years as a practitioner in community building, community organizing and conflict transformation. Social work provided the strongest theoretical and practice foundation for this work. I pursued this quest for community-led social change in both my social work practice and studies. Having initiated several change movements and nonprofit... Read More →

Thursday April 9, 2015 3:15pm - 4:40pm
Palm Isle (lobby level)

3:15pm

TH3.15.09 Strategies for empowerment: moving beyond discourses of victimhood
Moderator: Pierre Hamel, Université de Montréal

Haiti’s disasters and the advocacy efforts of transnational diaspora groups: insights for urban planning and public administration
Ann-Margaret Esnard, Georgia State University; Alka Sapat, Florida Atlantic University

Place-making by displaced women: Lessons in urban local governance from a slum resettlement site in Mumbai, India.
Ramya Ramanath, DePaul University

Addressing Intimate Partner Violence in Urban Environments: A New Paradigm
Kathy Sias, Florida International University; Nicole Ruggiano, Florida International University

Presenters
AE

Ann-Margaret Esnard

Georgia State University
RR

Ramya Ramanath

DePaul University
KS

Kathy Sias

Florida International University

Moderators
PH

Pierre Hamel

Université de Montréal

Thursday April 9, 2015 3:15pm - 4:40pm
Marti (lobby level)

3:15pm

TH3.15.11 Sustainable Practices: Identifying and Understanding Citizens Attitudes to Enviornmental Resources
Moderator: Ann Johnson, California State University San Bernardino

Food Scraps, Households, and Climate Change: Exploring New and Old Habits
Sally Geislar University of California, Irvine

Voter support for Environmental Bonds
Christopher Hawkins, University of Central Florida

Grassroots solutions vs large infrastructures for water supply: is an integrated strategy feasible? A tale from the Rio de Janeiro Metropolitan Region
Ana Lúcia N. d. P. Britto, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro; Suyá Quinstlr, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro

Presenters
AL

Ana Lúcia N. d. P. Britto

Federal University of Rio de Janeiro
avatar for Sally Geislar

Sally Geislar

PhD Candidate, University of California, Irvine
CV

Christopher V. Hawkins

University of Central Florida

Moderators
AJ

Ann Johnson

California State University San Bernardino

Thursday April 9, 2015 3:15pm - 4:40pm
Crandon (lobby level)

3:15pm

TH3.15.12 Equity and Urban Transportation
The papers on this panel address the dynamics of social equity in the context of urban transportation systems. Topics covered include transit-oriented development, car-sharing services, the changing demographics of urban station areas, and influence of urban policy and agency organization on the distribution of transit's benefits.


Community Participation in TOD Projects: The Case of Fruitvale Station
Jen Gray-O'Connor, University of California, Santa Cruz

Carsharing in Portland, Oregon: Who has Access?
Steven Howland, Portland State University; Dillon Mahmoudi, Portland State University

Transportation Equity in Long and Short Term Perspectives: Experiences in Toronto
William Michelson, University of Toronto

Getting to Opportunity: The What and the Why of Transit System Distribution
Elizabeth Williams, Northeastern University

Presenters
JG

Jen Gray-O'Connor

University of California, Santa Cruz
SH

Steven Howland

Portland State University
avatar for William Michelson

William Michelson

S.D. Clark Professor of Sociology, Emeritus, University of Toronto
Urban Sociologist. Particular interests in human behavior within urban settings and time-use documentation.
LW

Liz Williams

Northeastern University

Moderators
LW

Liz Williams

Northeastern University

Thursday April 9, 2015 3:15pm - 4:40pm
Godfrey (lobby level)

3:15pm

TH3.15.14 Migrants in the global era
Moderator: Jill Simone Gross, Hunter College of the City University of New York

Transnational allegiances; Investing in a home back home
Milena Gomez Kopp, Universidad Externado de Colombia

Crisis Narratives, Policy and Migrant Inclusion: Comparing the Cases of London and Dublin
Jill Simone Gross, Hunter College of the City University of New York

Rising Cosmopolitanism among the New Generations: Growing Up with Global Ties
Mehdi Nejatbakhsh, Urban Studies, MS, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Transnational Rights to Barcelona: Senegalese Immigrants and Urban Regeneration
Giloth Emma, Begue Coco; Shlay Anne, Temple University

Presenters
avatar for Jill Simone Gross

Jill Simone Gross

Director Graduate Program in Urban Affairs, Hunter College of the City University of New York
MG

Milena Gomez Kopp

Universidad Externado de Colombia
MN

Mehdi Nejatbakhsh

Urban Studies, MS, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
avatar for Anne Shlay

Anne Shlay

Temple University

Moderators
avatar for Jill Simone Gross

Jill Simone Gross

Director Graduate Program in Urban Affairs, Hunter College of the City University of New York

Thursday April 9, 2015 3:15pm - 4:40pm
Tuttle (lobby level)

3:15pm

TH3.15.15 Citizenship in City-Regions
Despite the richness of the literature, surprisingly little attention has been given to what it means to be a citizen in a city-regional context. As more people are expected to live in city-regions in the future this question calls for scholarly attention. The city-regional context challenges traditional understandings of the local citizenship. Rights and duties such as the right to vote in local elections, to influence local decisions and to pay taxes are usually linked to the municipality where one resides. However, citizens in surrounding municipalities may equally well be interested in core city politics or the political priorities made in a municipality where the workplace is located. There may also be an interest in how collective problems that concern the city-region as a whole are handled. Citizens may have weaker connections to their home municipality and territorial identities may extend beyond their local community. Hence, in city-regions, traditional administrative borders and the role of the municipality as the local polity are being challenged. These processes may also have gendered consequences for the power relations between women and men.

This special session presents research from Poland, Sweden and the US that provides new insights into what it means to be a citizen in a city-regional context. They are all contributions to a coming special issue on citizenship in city-regions published by the Journal of Urban Affairs.


Territorial political orientations in Swedish city-regions
Anders Lidström, Umeå University

How Metropolitan can you go? Citizenship in Polish city-regions
Marta Lackowska, University of Warsaw; Lukasz Mikula, University of Warsaw

Left holding the baby or bringing home the bacon together? The gendered consequences of regional enlargement and increased commuting
Christine Hudson, Umeå University

Political Orientations in City-Regions: Correlates of the “Regional Perspective”
Michael Leo Owens, Emory University

Presenters
avatar for Christine Hudson

Christine Hudson

Professor, Umeå University
I'm a political scientist and much of the focus of my research is on gender and the city and in urban and regional policy
ML

Marta Lackowska

University of Warsaw
AL

Anders Lidström

Umeå University
avatar for Michael Leo Owens

Michael Leo Owens

Associate Professor of Political Science, Emory University

Moderators
AL

Anders Lidström

Umeå University

Thursday April 9, 2015 3:15pm - 4:40pm
Flagler (lobby level)

3:15pm

TH3.15.16 The Neoliberal Neighborhood: New Political Landscapes in Detroit and Beyond
Increasing attention is being paid to the ways black and brown communities are adapting to the fiscal crisis facing Rust Belt cities. A growing number of scholars argue that in the absence of adequate public goods, services, and amenities, residents in cities like Detroit have stepped up to take back neglected spaces and do the work in new ways. Yet while these more informal modes of insurgent citizenship may offer promise for residents struggling to maintain neglected neighborhoods, they pose a new set of problems and require increasing amounts of leverage in the increasingly bitter battles for valuable urban land, jobs, and resources. This panel pauses to reconsider the changing political landscape of the neoliberal city as well as the political choices available to its inhabitants. The four cases examined here complicate the idea that volunteer labor and grassroots activism will fill the void in governance left in the wake of urban austerity and broken democratic structures. As everyday people step up to enforce nondiscrimination policy and code violations, organize crime patrols, or fight the acquisition of land for large-scale redevelopment projects, the survival of urban neighborhoods may rest not on the willingness of residents to participate, but on who is funded to do so and what options the state has put forth to begin with.


Raise Money, Raise Hell, or Leave: The High Cost of Negative Freedoms in a Black Working Class Neighborhood
Jackson Christopher Bartlett, Northwestern University

Deciding to Build or Burn Bridges: Strategic Goal-Setting within an Environmental Sacrifice Zone
Amy Krings, University of Michigan; Sian Olson Dowis, Northwestern University

This is Not What We Do: Community Development at the Intersection of Neoliberalism, Policy Foreclosure, and Bureaucratic Governance
Brian Sargent, Northwestern University

City Auction: Municipal Response to Fiscal Distress in Detroit
Meghan Wilson, Brown University

Presenters
avatar for Jackson Christopher Bartlett

Jackson Christopher Bartlett

Doctoral Student, Northwestern University
My research is guided by the question of the ongoing significance of race in the neoliberal restructuring of US cities. More specifically, this paper deals with the individualization of responsibility for neighborhood systems, an individualization that reflects broader shifts in urban governance whereby responsibility is passed down to the neighborhood or block level and democratic systems are eroded and pass authority up to centralized... Read More →
SO

Sian Olson Dowis

Northwestern University
BS

Brian Sargent

Northwestern University
MW

Meghan Wilson

Brown University

Moderators
avatar for Jackson Christopher Bartlett

Jackson Christopher Bartlett

Doctoral Student, Northwestern University
My research is guided by the question of the ongoing significance of race in the neoliberal restructuring of US cities. More specifically, this paper deals with the individualization of responsibility for neighborhood systems, an individualization that reflects broader shifts in urban governance whereby responsibility is passed down to the neighborhood or block level and democratic systems are eroded and pass authority up to centralized... Read More →

Thursday April 9, 2015 3:15pm - 4:40pm
Michelangelo (2nd floor)

3:15pm

TH3.15.17 Tourism and city Branding and their impact on economic development
Moderator: Heather Khan, Eastern Michigan University

Place Branding as Policy in Puerto Rico: An American or Latin American Example?
Carlos Suárez Carrasquillo, University of Massachusetts-Amherst

From Promotion of Place to Construction of Place: Reconsidering Place Branding’s Role in Local Economic Development
Evan Cleave, University of Western Ontario; Godwin Arku, University of Western Ontario

Local Tourism Initiatives as Strategies for Economic Development: Examining the Catalytic Role of Convention and Visitors Bureaus (CVBs)
Heather Khan, Eastern Michigan University; Dawn Pearcy, Eastern Michigan University; Kelly Victor-Burke, Eastern Michigan University; Jenna Levin, Eastern Michigan University

Policy “tourism” or transformative knowledge exchange: lessons from “First Stop Portland” about how cities learn
Sarah Iannarone, First Stop Portland, Portland State University

Presenters
EC

Evan Cleave

University of Western Ontario
SI

Sarah Iannarone

First Stop Portland, Portland State University
HK

Heather Khan

Eastern Michigan University
avatar for Carlos Suárez-Carrasquillo

Carlos Suárez-Carrasquillo

Lecturer, University of Massachusetts-Amherst
I have examined how city marketing has been used as a tool by the municipality of Guaynabo, Puerto Rico to attract residents of a higher socioeconomic class, resulting in an increase in gated communities and a more gentrified Guaynabo. I'm currently following up this work by comparing how different Puerto Rican municipalities have utilized city branding campaigns, documenting the political resistance to these campaigns, and by examining the... Read More →

Moderators
HK

Heather Khan

Eastern Michigan University

Thursday April 9, 2015 3:15pm - 4:40pm
Dupont (lobby level)

3:15pm

TH3.15.18 Sustainability and Security indicators: national & International
Moderator: Gordana Rabrenovic, Northeastern University

Urban Sustainability Assessment: A Focus on the Interpretation of Indicators Following their Measurement
Juste Rajaonson, University of Quebec in Montreal; Georges A. Tanguay, University of Quebec in Montreal

Development of the United States Human Security Index in Addressing the Challenges of Vulnerable Populations in U.S. Urban Areas
Portia Rawles, Rawles & Associates, PLC

A Tale of Cities: Houston, Copenhagen, and Urban Transformation
Kevin Smiley, Rice University; Michael O. Emerson, Rice University

Presenters
avatar for Juste Rajaonson

Juste Rajaonson

Doctoral Student, University of Quebec in Montreal
Juste Rajaonson is a resident from Montreal (Canada) and a last year Ph.D. student in the Department of Urban and Tourism Studies at the University of Quebec in Montreal (UQAM). Juste’s research interests include urban sustainability metrics, implementation, and determinants. Prior to his doctoral studies, Juste worked for six years in the municipal sector and actively contributed to the implementation of projects and policies related to... Read More →
PR

Portia Rawles

Rawles & Associates, PLC
KS

Kevin Smiley

Rice University

Moderators
GR

Gordana Rabrenovic

Northeastern University

Thursday April 9, 2015 3:15pm - 4:40pm
Gusman (lobby level)

4:45pm

5:30pm

6:00pm

7:00pm

Thursday - Dinner (on your own)
Thursday April 9, 2015 7:00pm - 8:00pm
 
Friday, April 10
 

6:15am

Friday - Fun Run / Fun Walk
 Meet in Intercontinental Hotel lobby at 6:00am.

Friday April 10, 2015 6:15am - 7:00am
InterContinental Hotel (meet in lobby at 6:00am)

7:00am

7:00am

7:00am

Friday - Registration (7am-6pm)
Express Conference Registration
Tours, Guest Meal Tickets and On-Site Registration

Friday April 10, 2015 7:00am - 6:00pm
Chopin Ballroom (2nd floor)

7:15am

FR7.00.05 Transforming Education through University Community School Partnerships
Evidence suggests that university community school partnerships impact “whole student, whole school and whole community.”Creative solutions and strategic partnerships in education are beneficial to K-12 schools,postsecondary with increasing attention devoted to education reform, college access, and community outreach programs, engaged universities have seized the moment through strategic initiatives to further their mission of reducing disparities in access to higher education.The Education Effect–BTW has been developed to support and challenge students to acquire the knowledge, skills and disposition needed to effectively graduate high school and enroll and succeed in a two-year or four-year post-secondary institution.Furthermore, EE-BTW supports the individual needs of students’ as they reach and grow to their full potential by infusing additional personnel and a culture of high expectations.Additionally, the academic enrichment and educational opportunities provided by The Education Effect–BTW will focus on 21st century academic and workforce readiness skills such as critical thinking, problem solving, decision making, collaboration, communication, personal responsibility, creativity, innovation, and information technology.The Education Effect–BTW is funded through a generous foundation committed to urban education and community partnership. Critical to the development of The Education Effect-BTW, are the benefits to students, the school, community and university.Broadening educational opportunity to include kindergarten through post-secondary completion is vital to student learning, because it increases success over time, as opposed to fragmented programs in which students are treated for impending “failure.”It is the difference between prevention and intervention after the fact. This paper challenges existing ways of understanding equity and inclusion and the institutional response to provide access and support to underrepresented students.

Presenters
HD

Hale Donnie

Director, Florida International University
avatar for Chaundra L Whitehead

Chaundra L Whitehead

Research Assistant, Florida International University


Friday April 10, 2015 7:15am - 8:00am
Grand Ballroom (2nd floor)

7:15am

FR7.00.01 How Can the UAA Support Institutional Member Interests?
Hosted by the UAA Membership Committee This breakfast roundtable offers institutional members an opportunity to discuss key issues and concerns facing their institutions. Conveners will facilitate a discussion on how the Urban Affairs Association can best represent and promote institutional member interests. Conveners: Marla Nelson Associate Professor Department of Planning and Urban Studies University of New Orleans Jacob Wagner Associate Professor Department of Architecture & Urban Plan & Design University of Missouri at Kansas City

Presenters
MN

Marla Nelson

University of New Orleans
JW

Jacob Wagner

University of Missouri-Kansas City


Friday April 10, 2015 7:15am - 8:00am
Grand Ballroom (2nd floor)

7:15am

FR7.00.02 Applying for Grants: Perspectives from Seasoned Professors
This roundtable is presented by 3 seasoned professors who have received significant grants over their academic lives. Tips and insights will be offered.

Presenters
RC

Roger Caves

San Diego State University
DP

David Perry

University of Illinois at Chicago
FW

Fritz Wagner

University of Washington


Friday April 10, 2015 7:15am - 8:00am
Grand Ballroom (2nd floor)

8:05am

FR8.05.03 Place-Making for the Poor: Creative Destruction and Security of Home
This session will focus on place-making for and by low-income households. Rather than situated outside investment in urban space, low-income households find themselves at the center of urban change, which makes them vulnerable to displacement and the loss of the security of home. Economic change, real estate cycles, and transformations of urban governance all produce "creative destruction" which limits low-income households' control over place-making. At the same time, this dislocation can serve as a basis for political opportunities to make claims to the security of place. Speakers will draw on insights from studies that they have engaged in, focusing on investment in home-ownership and rental housing, transformation of public housing, and community land trusts. The comments will be focused on how low-income households are exposed to forces of creative destruction, what their effects are for the security of place and home, and how alternative forms of place-making can work to rebuild autonomy, security and political capacity.

Presenters
EG

Edward Goetz

University of Minnesota
JL

Jeffrey Lowe

Texas Southern University
KN

Kathe Newman

Rutgers University
SS

Susan Saegert

City University of New York
BT

Benjamin Teresa

Rutgers University

Moderators
SS

Susan Saegert

City University of New York

Friday April 10, 2015 8:05am - 9:30am
Windsor (2nd floor)

8:05am

FR8.05.18 Engaging the community though data sharing, analysis, and action plans - Lessons from researchers and practitioners
Putting data in the hands of the community is a valuable and sustainable way to effect individual and neighborhood level change in any community. Presenters will discuss and demonstrate data sharing and discussion methodologies that benefit community members, researchers, policy makers, and practitioners. Elsa Falkenburger, Research Associate at the Urban Institute (UI), will engage participants in a discussion modeled after a data sharing methodology – a “Data Walk” - that UI developed for several of its projects around health, housing, and services. Select data points are presented in the form of charts and bullet points printed on poster sized paper and discussed in small groups traveling to each data station. Isaac Castillo, Director of Data and Evaluation at the DC Promise Neighborhood Initiative (DCPNI), will demonstrate several techniques used with residents of the Kenilworth-Parkside community (in Washington DC) intended to encourage community data use. This includes methods to help community residents understand and interpret data (infographics), encourage residents to seek out data to inform decisions, and help residents learn how they can use data push for community change. Irwin Royster, of Planned Parenthood's Ophelia Egypt Center in Washington DC will present his methods for sharing Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) data with youth and using the discussion to mobilize youth to take action in their lives and their communities around sexual health and safety. Peter Gorski, Chief Health and Child Development Officer at The Children’s Trust, and his community partners from the Miami Children’s Initiative, will jointly present on their experiences convening residents, presenting data, and engaging them to effect change in their community around how young children entering school are developing.

Presenters
avatar for Isaac Castillo

Isaac Castillo

Deputy Director, DC Promise Neighborhood Initiative
Isaac is recognized as a thought leader in the field of nonprofit performance management and evaluation, and brings over 15 years of nonprofit and evaluation experience to the DC Promise Neighborhood Initiative (DCPNI). Isaac supervises DCPNI’s efforts to improve outcomes through the strategic coordination of solutions and strategies. | | Isaac’s work has been highlighted in publications such as the Chronicle of Philanthropy, Youth... Read More →
MG

Maria-Paula Garcia

Research and Evaluation Manager, The Children's Trust
avatar for Sarah Gillespie

Sarah Gillespie

Urban Institute
CG

Cecilia Gutierrez

Miami Children's Initiative
IR

Irwin Royster

Ophelia Egypt Program Center

Moderators
avatar for Sarah Gillespie

Sarah Gillespie

Urban Institute

Friday April 10, 2015 8:05am - 9:30am
Godfrey (lobby level)

8:05am

FR8.05.01 Preserving access to the city through housing policy
Renters form the majority of residents in all large cities in the United States. On average, renters’ incomes are substantially lower than either the regional or city average family or household income. Due in part to tax incentives that stimulated the production of rental housing in the decades following the second world war, a large stock of aging rental housing in large cities is now vulnerable to loss through redevelopment, potentially displacing a substantial number of low income households. This vulnerability is heightened in the context of rapidly changing market conditions, planning efforts that are stimulating redevelopment (particularly transit-oriented development), and the expiration of subsidies that have kept rents low in some buildings. Not only would replacing large numbers of demolished units with comparably affordable new housing be prohibitively expensive, the displacement of thousands of low income households from central city neighborhoods would represent a dramatic change in the social character of cities, with potentially disastrous ripple effects for both individual households displaced and for the larger community. This panel will review current efforts to preserve rental housing in cities across the country, from the perspective of national housing policy advocates and technical assistance providers (the National Housing Trust, and Enterprise Community Partners), through comparative study of contrasting approaches and motivations for local initiatives in three cities (DC, Denver and Chicago), and through discussion of an effort to strategically preserve buildings in locations offerings residents important benefits in Austin, Texas.


Making the Case for Retrofitting Unsubsidized Affordable Housing: How, When and Why Cities Preserve and Green Older Multifamily Housing
Barbara Brown Wilson, University of Virginia

Gentrification without displacement: lessons from six cities
Melinda Pollack, Enterprise Community Partners

Using the LIHTC to preserve affordable rental housing near transit
Todd Nedwick, National Housing Trust

Preserving access to changing places: a strategy for rental housing preservation
Elizabeth J. Mueller, University of Texas at Austin

Presenters
EJ

Elizabeth J. Mueller

University of Texas
TN

Todd Nedwick

National Housing Trust
MP

Melinda Pollack

Enterprise Community Partners
BB

Barbara Brown Wilson

University of Virginia

Moderators
BB

Barbara Brown Wilson

University of Virginia

Friday April 10, 2015 8:05am - 9:30am
Balmoral (2nd floor)

8:05am

FR8.05.02 The Challenges of Voucher Housing
Moderator: Robert Silverman, University at Buffalo

Are Voucher Holders Being Overcharged?
Matthew Desmond, Harvard University; Kristin L. Perkins, Harvard University

Are they Protected? A National Analysis of What Happens to Subsidized Tenants When an Owner Opts Out.
Vincent Reina, University of Southern California; Benjamin Winter, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

Why do applicants to subsidized housing refuse offers of housing? Making sense of counter-intuitive research findings.
Biljana Vasilevska, McMaster University; James Dunn, McMaster University

Low-Income Housing Policy: The Work of Advocacy Organizations in Cities
Anaid Yerena, University of California, Irvine

Presenters
KL

Kristin L. Perkins

Harvard University
VR

Vincent Reina

University of Southern California
BV

Biljana Vasilevska

McMaster University
avatar for Anaid Yerena

Anaid Yerena

University of Washington-Tacoma

Moderators
avatar for Robert Silverman

Robert Silverman

Professor and PhD Program Director, University at Buffalo
Rob Silverman's research focuses on the non-profit sector, the role of community-based organizations in urban neighborhoods, education reform, and inequality in inner city housing markets. His current research projects include studies of non-profit finance and advocacy,school reform,shrinking cities, and fair housing.

Friday April 10, 2015 8:05am - 9:30am
Sandringham (2nd floor)

8:05am

FR8.05.04 Aging and Disability in Urban Communities
Moderator: Alex Schwartz, The New School

Locational Attainment of Disabled Households in Metropolitan America
Kaya Hamer-Small, University at Albany, State University of New York

Urban Schools, Surveillance and the Safety of Students with Disabilities
Kirsten Loutzenhiser, PhD, Troy University

Housing for Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: A Review of State Policies
Lynn McCormick, Hunter College; Alex Schwartz, The New School

Who’s View: Operationalizing Disability Space Identification in an Urban Neighborhood Context
Leonor Vanik, College of Urban Planning and Public Affairs, University of Illinois at Chicago

Presenters
KH

Kaya Hamer-Small

University at Albany, State University of New York
avatar for Kirsten Loutzenhiser

Kirsten Loutzenhiser

Assistant Professor, Troy University
Dr. Kirsten Loutzenhiser is an Assistant Professor at Troy University focuses on areas of public administration that include social justice, emergency management and global public administration. Her interests highlight the importance of fostering cultural awareness, diversity and inclusion at a micro and macro level. She carries her public administration expertise to apply to the delivery of public services via government, nonprofit or... Read More →
avatar for Alex Schwartz

Alex Schwartz

The New School
LV

Leonor Vanik

University of Illinois at Chicago

Moderators
avatar for Alex Schwartz

Alex Schwartz

The New School

Friday April 10, 2015 8:05am - 9:30am
Oxford (2nd floor)

8:05am

FR8.05.05 Understanding Sources of Black Unrest in the 21st Century Metropolis: Planning, Policing, and Poverty
Black unrest in the metropolis has occurred for over 50 years. In virtually all instances, we find crucibles of systemic discrimination, economic exclusion, political marginalization and an incident that exposes all three phenomena and more. Unlike black unrest in the 1960s, black unrest in the 21st century is both urban and suburban. The theme of this panel is a discussion of the question of what black unrest in metropolitan areas of Missouri, New York, Florida, California and others means for urban affairs scholarship, especially how we theorize and make practical sense of racialized policing, “post-racial” planning, and enduring poor places.


Understanding Ferguson: Black Neighborhoods as the Epicenter of Neoliberal Racism
Jin-Kyu Jung, SUNY at Buffalo

Reporting on a Riot: Media Accounts as Social History in Ferguson, Missouri
Daniel Monti, Saint Louis University

Racial Segregation and Economic Decline in the Older U.S. Suburbs
Christopher Niedt, Hofstra University; Katrin Anacker, George Mason University; Chang Kwon, George Mason University

Rethinking Detroit’s Decline: Regionalism, Race and the Agglomeration of Capital Beyond the City
Harley Etienne, University of Michigan Ann Arbor

Presenters
HE

Harley Etienne

University of Michigan Ann Arbor
DM

Dan Monti

Saint louis University
CN

Christopher Niedt

Academic Director, National Center for Suburban Studies, Hofstra University
HT

Henry Taylor

University at Buffalo

Moderators
HT

Henry Taylor

University at Buffalo

Friday April 10, 2015 8:05am - 9:30am
Escorial (2nd floor)

8:05am

FR8.05.07 U.S. Education Policy Confronts Community and Educator Opposition: Activism and Scholarship
This panel proposal is intended as part of the Activism Track. National education change in the U.S. has marginalized community and educator voices through increasing dependence on standardized metrics, market logics, philanthropic funding, and governance with limited democratic accountability. Significant resistance has developed on a variety of issues, including: school closures, barriers to teacher diversity, standardized testing, state take-overs, teachers unions, and agendas that prioritize private interests. In the first paper, Barbara Ferman describes the corporate reform agenda, resistance to it, and the challenges facing organizers of these opposition movements. Kimberly Mayfield Lynch discusses teacher diversity as an issue that has educational, community building, and economic significance and provides the details of a successful teacher diversity program won by community initiative. In the third paper, Ryan M. Good tells the stories of community responses in three Philadelphia neighborhoods after their local public schools were threatened with closure. William F. Ellis details the racially inequitable U.S. policies that prevent urban schools from creating a diverse and effective teaching force. He contextualizes these policies within a critical race theory framework, and then defines the steps needed by academics and activists to break down the barriers. In the final paper, Kitty Kelly Epstein uses insights from critical economics and critical race theory to explain why policies that have not “worked” are still being pursued. She looks at the impact of permanent racism and the lack of interest convergence on national and local movements for egalitarian change and concludes with a prediction.


David & Goliath: Challenges, Policy Windows, and Slingshots in the Corporate Reform Landscape
Barbara Ferman, Temple University; Nicholas Palazzolo, Temple University

Achieving Teacher Diversity: Teach Tomorrow in Oakland
Kimberly Mayfield-Lynch, Holy Names University; Rachelle Rogers-Ard, Teach Tomorrow in Oakland

Invoking landscapes of inequality: Race, class, and place in Philadelphia’s school closure debate
Ryan Good, Rutgers University

Breaking the Barriers to a Diverse Teaching Force
William (Fred) Ellis, Holy Names University

Commodified, Racially Inequitable Education Policy Examined through the Insights of Critical Race Theory and Critical Economic Theory
Kitty Kelly Epstein, Education Today/HNU/Fielding

Presenters
avatar for William (Fred) Ellis

William (Fred) Ellis

Holy Names University
Dr. Ellis was born the second son to a family enmeshed in the U.S. share-cropping system in an agricultural region of Georgia. He graduated from one of the most prestigious of Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Morehouse College, and participated in the Southern Civil Rights Movement. He became an educator and taught in the San Francisco School District. He organized one of the most successful programs in the U.S. to diversify the... Read More →
avatar for Kitty Kelly Epstein

Kitty Kelly Epstein

Professor, Holy Names University and Fielding Graduate University
In 2013 Kitty Kelly Epstein was honored with the Activist Scholar Award at the national conference of the Urban Affairs Association.  This was based on her work in Oakland, California where she led an innovation in democracy that consisted of 41 groups comprised of 800 people whose recommendations helped to change public policy on land use; the hiring of local residents on city-funded construction projects; the diversification of the teaching... Read More →
avatar for Barbara Ferman

Barbara Ferman

Professor, Temple University
Born and raised in Brooklyn (which is still the 4th largest city!), I had an early education about urban areas that was shaped by some very practical activities – turning empty lots into playgrounds, keeping the hand ball court for hours, dodging traffic, and learning the subway lines. Over the years, this practical education morphed into a concern with issues of housing and community development, neighborhood politics and community... Read More →
avatar for Ryan M. Good

Ryan M. Good

Doctoral student, Rutgers University
I am a doctoral candidate in Planning and Public Policy at the Bloustein School at Rutgers University. My interests lie in the areas of community development, place-based organizations, and the politics of neighborhood identity. In my dissertation, I am studying how local stakeholders invoked place-rooted arguments in contesting the proposed closure of Philadelphia public schools in 2013. My research explores the politics and the construction... Read More →
avatar for Kimberly Mayfield Lynch

Kimberly Mayfield Lynch

Holy Names University
Kimberly Mayfield is an Associate Professor and Chair of the Education Department at Holy Names University. She received her doctorate in Learning and Instruction from the University of San Francisco. Her research interests and activism include creating a permanent diverse teaching force, and the disproportionate over-representation of African American males in special education. From 2006-2011, Dr. Mayfield served as a co-convener of the... Read More →

Moderators
avatar for Kitty Kelly Epstein

Kitty Kelly Epstein

Professor, Holy Names University and Fielding Graduate University
In 2013 Kitty Kelly Epstein was honored with the Activist Scholar Award at the national conference of the Urban Affairs Association.  This was based on her work in Oakland, California where she led an innovation in democracy that consisted of 41 groups comprised of 800 people whose recommendations helped to change public policy on land use; the hiring of local residents on city-funded construction projects; the diversification of the teaching... Read More →

Friday April 10, 2015 8:05am - 9:30am
Star Isle (lobby level)

8:05am

FR8.05.08 Immigrant Engagement, Participation and Mobilization
Moderator: Ryan Allen, University of Minnesota

Building Immigrant Engagement Practice in Planning: The Case of Somali Immigrants in the Twin Cities
Ryan Allen, University of Minnesota; Carissa Schively Slotterback, University of Minnesota

Place-making for Undocumented Immigrants: the Role of Higher Education
Ann Johnson, California State University San Bernardino

Urban Politics in the “Turkish Neighborhood” of Berlin-Germany: Splits and Democratic Alliances
Berna Turam, Northeastern University

Presenters
avatar for Ryan Allen

Ryan Allen

Assistant Professor, University of Minnesota
AJ

Ann Johnson

California State University San Bernardino

Moderators
avatar for Ryan Allen

Ryan Allen

Assistant Professor, University of Minnesota

Friday April 10, 2015 8:05am - 9:30am
Michelangelo (2nd floor)

8:05am

FR8.05.09 Social and Political Action: Organizational Roles
Moderator: Katherine Hankins, Georgia State University

Bonding Social Capital and the Promotion of Collective Efficacy: Neighborhood Racial Homogeneity as an Enhancing Mechanism
Charles Collins, University of Washington, Bothell; Zachary P. Neal, Michigan State University; Jennifer Watling Neal, Michigan State University

Flows of Faith and Place-making: Transnational Migration and the Role of Faith-based Institutions in Neighborhood Change
Katherine Hankins, Georgia State University; Adrian Bailey, Hong Kong Baptist University

The Poverty of Politics in a Northern City: A Case Study of Democratic Inclusion and Economic Exclusion in Philadelphia, 1970-2010
Lorraine Minnite, Rutgers University-Camden

Scaling Up to Increase Community-Based Organization Voice
Jason Burkett, Loyola University Chicago; Teresa Neumann, Loyola University Chicago; Philip Nyden, Loyola University Chicago; Sean Young, Loyola University Chicago

Examining Non-Profit and Local Government Partnerships in the Context of Planning Services for the Homeless
Jessica Lauren Perez, University of California, Irvine

Presenters
avatar for Charles Collins

Charles Collins

Assistant Professor, University of Washington, Bothell
avatar for Katherine Hankins

Katherine Hankins

Associate Professor, Georgia State University
LM

Lorraine Minnite

Rutgers University-Camden
PN

Philip Nyden

Loyola University Chicago
JL

Jessica L. Perez

University of California, Irvine

Moderators
avatar for Katherine Hankins

Katherine Hankins

Associate Professor, Georgia State University

Friday April 10, 2015 8:05am - 9:30am
Trinity (2nd floor)

8:05am

FR8.05.10 Green Infrastructure in Legacy Cities
This session, as a part of the two-part session proposal (along with “Vacancy as Opportunity in Legacy Cities”), examines the potentials of Green Infrastructure (GI) implementation in legacy cities by exploring various case studies. Vacant or blighted properties in the city are often associated with various negative outcomes, including depressed property values, loss of the tax base, environmental hazards, public safety concerns, and overall decline of morale in the area. This problem is most acute in cities that have long suffered with the abundance of blighted properties, such as so-called “legacy cities” or “shrinking cities.” These cities grapple with the short- and long-term consequences of having thousands or tens of thousands of underutilized properties across cities experiencing little to no population growth. With the extensive amount of vacant land and little demand for formal redevelopment efforts, there has been excitement over the potential of converting blighted or vacant lots into green spaces, such as parks, community gardens, or urban farms, with anticipated positive outcomes of such conversion. The panel aims to explore the opportunities and challenges in implementing green infrastructure programs and policies.


Staying cool in the green city: What vacant land can do for spatial injustices in urban heating
Hamil Pearsall, Temple University

Activating Capacities: Eco strategies for vacant land in St. Louis
Patty Heyda, Washington University in St. Louis; Natalie Yates, Washington University in St. Louis; Christine Yogiaman, Washington University in St. Louis

Implementing Green Infrastructure in Philadelphia to Meet Environmental, Social, Economic, and Equity Goals
Christina Rosan, Temple University

Getting to Green: What Helps or Hinders Green Infrastructure Installation Following Demolition in Legacy Cities
Matthew D. Weber, University of Michigan; Margaret Dewar, University of Michigan; Alicia Alvarez, University of Michigan

Presenters
avatar for Patty Heyda

Patty Heyda

Assistant Professor in Urban Design, Architecture, Washington University in St. Louis
HP

Hamil Pearsall

Temple Univeresity
CR

Christina Rosan

Temple University
MD

Matthew D. Weber

Doctoral Candidate, University of Michigan

Moderators
CR

Christina Rosan

Temple University

Friday April 10, 2015 8:05am - 9:30am
Hibiscus (lobby level)

8:05am

FR8.05.11 Post-Disaster Cities and Communities
Moderator: Robert Collins, Dillard University

The "New Normal" in New Orleans: Findings on the Political and Environmemtal Effects of Hurrican Katrina Ten Years Later
Robert Collins, Dillard University

Networked Environmental Governance in Post-Sandy New York City
James Connolly, Northeastern University

MEASURING HOUSING RECOVERY AFTER HURRICANE KATRINA: DIFFERENCES BETWEEN URBAN AND RURAL AREAS
N. Emel Ganapati, Florida International University; Sukumar Ganapati, Florida International University; Shaoming Cheng,

Resiliency After Sandy: Climate change and disaster planning for adaptation in urban environments
Julia Nevarez, Kean University

Presenters
avatar for Robert Collins

Robert Collins

Conrad Hilton Endowed Professor of Urban Studies and Public Policy, Dillard University
Robert Collins is Conrad Hilton Endowed Professor of Urban Studies and Public Policy at Dillard University in New Orleans. Other positions he has held at Dillard include: Associate Provost and Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs, Founding Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, and Chair of the School of Social Sciences. His research interests include: urban politics, the politics of land use planning, and disaster planning. His... Read More →
JC

James Connolly

Northeastern University
NE

N. Emel Ganapati

Florida International University
JN

Julia Nevarez

Kean University

Moderators
avatar for Robert Collins

Robert Collins

Conrad Hilton Endowed Professor of Urban Studies and Public Policy, Dillard University
Robert Collins is Conrad Hilton Endowed Professor of Urban Studies and Public Policy at Dillard University in New Orleans. Other positions he has held at Dillard include: Associate Provost and Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs, Founding Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, and Chair of the School of Social Sciences. His research interests include: urban politics, the politics of land use planning, and disaster planning. His... Read More →

Friday April 10, 2015 8:05am - 9:30am
Crandon (lobby level)

8:05am

FR8.05.13 Development policies: Evaluations and critiques
Moderator: Eran Razin, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Checks and Balances in Planning Decentralization: Lessons from the Ontario Planning System
Eran Razin, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Identification of the Approaches and Processes Allowing the Development of Effective and Sustainable Local Affordable Housing Goals, Objectives, and Policies
Edward Murray, Florida International University Metropolitan Center; Zhayda Reilly, Florida International University Metropolitan Center

Universal Accessibility in Action: An Analysis of the Quebec System of Mandatory Local Action Plans in the Montreal Metropolitan Community Region
Florence Paulhiac Scherrer, Department of Urban Studies and Tourism, Université du Québec à Montréal

Presenters
FP

Florence Paulhiac

University of Quebec in Montreal
ER

Eran Razin

Hebrew University of Jerusalem
ZR

Zhayda Reilly

Florida International University Metropolitan Center

Moderators
ER

Eran Razin

Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Friday April 10, 2015 8:05am - 9:30am
Flagler (lobby level)

8:05am

FR8.05.14 Understanding how globalization affects the international context
Moderator: Bernadette Hanlon, The Ohio State University

Motivations for North-South Local Government Cooperation in the United States
Patricia Ciorici, Rutgers University

A Divided Periphery: An Examination of Suburban Change Across the Globe
Bernadette Hanlon, The Ohio State University

Urban Challenges Created by Global Agricultural Networks in Western Uruguay
Silvina Lopez Barrera, Visiting Assistant Professor of Architecture, Middlebury College

Industrial and Spatial Agglomeration in World Cities of Developmental State:
Beijing as an Example
Xiulian Ma, Chinese Academy of Governance (Beijing, China)

Globalization Patterns and Local Factors in Cities: An Examination
Eric Yankson, University of Louisville

Presenters
avatar for Silvina Lopez Barrera

Silvina Lopez Barrera

Middlebury College
PC

Patricia Ciorici

Rutgers University
BH

Bernadette Hanlon

Assistant Professor, The Ohio State University
XM

Xiulian Ma

Chinese Academy of Governance
EY

Eric Yankson

University of Louisville

Moderators
BH

Bernadette Hanlon

Assistant Professor, The Ohio State University

Friday April 10, 2015 8:05am - 9:30am
Palm Isle (lobby level)

8:05am

FR8.05.15 Responding to vulnerability and marginalization in urban governance
Moderator: Kirk Harris, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Incorporation of Marginalized Interests in Urban Governance
Jeong Joo Ahn, Arizona State University

Picturing Women’s Governance: Participatory Photography in the Philippines
Yanjun Cai, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

An Evolving Theory of the Urban Political Economy of Black Mayoral Regimes:Neoliberalism, Governance and the Growing Crisis of Inequality
Kirk Harris, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee; Sahana Goswami, EMBARQ India- The views expressed are the personal opinion of the author and do not reflect the view of EMBARQ

Bristol Place Redevelopment: Modern Urban Renewal in Post-Kelo Fiscal Policy Space
Natalie Prochaska, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Andrew Greenlee, University of Illinois

How does social vulnerability change at the neighborhood level? Temporal spatial analysis of Milwaukee, 1980-2010
Juliana Wilhoit, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Nancy Smeback, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Annie Contractor, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Carolina Chantrill, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Bethany Cutts, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Andrew Greenlee, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Presenters
JJ

Jeong Joo Ahn

Arizona State University
YC

Yanjun Cai

University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Urban and Regional Planning, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
avatar for Kirk Harris

Kirk Harris

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
avatar for Natalie Prochaska

Natalie Prochaska

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Affordable Housing, Economic Development, Shelter Poverty, Real Estate Development
avatar for Juliana Wilhoit

Juliana Wilhoit

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Moderators
avatar for Kirk Harris

Kirk Harris

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Friday April 10, 2015 8:05am - 9:30am
Dupont (lobby level)

8:05am

FR8.05.16 Political Impacts of Urban and Suburban Social Changes
Moderator: Kimberley Johnson, Barnard College, Columbia Universty

It Took a Village: Placetaking in the Global City
David Edwards, The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Political Gentrification in the United States: An Analysis of Thirty Neighborhoods in Ten Cities
Derek Hyra, American University; J. Rosie Tighe, Cleveland State University

Governing Black Suburbs: Does race make a difference in shaping suburban governance?
Kimberley Johnson, Barnard College, Columbia Universty

Mass Incarceration & the Curtailing of Urban Citizenship
Elizabeth Jones, University of Louisville

Gentrification & Political Destabilization: What, Where & How?
Jamila Michener, Cornell University; Diane Wong, Cornell University

Presenters
DE

David Edwards

The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
DH

Derek Hyra

American University
avatar for Kimberley Johnson

Kimberley Johnson

Director, Barnard-Columbia Urban Studies Program, Barnard College, Columbia Universty
avatar for Elizabeth Jones

Elizabeth Jones

University of Louisville
JM

Jamila Michener

Cornell University

Moderators
avatar for Kimberley Johnson

Kimberley Johnson

Director, Barnard-Columbia Urban Studies Program, Barnard College, Columbia Universty

Friday April 10, 2015 8:05am - 9:30am
Alhambra (2nd floor)

8:05am

FR8.05.17 Tourism and economic development
Moderator: Madlyn Bonimy, Tennessee State University

“Tourism in the City of Pigeon Forge, Tennessee: The Strategy for Economic Development”
Madlyn Bonimy, Tennessee State University

Seven50 Southeast Florida Prosperity Plan
Jean-Claude Garcia-Zamor, Florida Inernational University; Ramon Trias, Director of Planning and Zoning in the City of Coral Gables

Mountains and Muses: Tourism Development in Asheville, North Carolina
Robert Kerstein, University of Tampa; Elizabeth Strom, University of South Florida

Presenters
MB

Madlyn Bonimy

Tennessee State University
avatar for Jean-Claude Garcia-Zamor

Jean-Claude Garcia-Zamor

Professor of Public Administration, Florida International University
RK

Robert Kerstein

University of Tampa

Moderators
MB

Madlyn Bonimy

Tennessee State University

Friday April 10, 2015 8:05am - 9:30am
Raphael (2nd floor)

8:05am

FR8.05.21 Jurisdictional shifts and interlocality
Moderator: Eric Zeemering, Northern Illinois University

Who feels metropolitan in the United States?
Thomas Favre-Bulle, Stanford University, The Bill Lane Center for the American West

The Evolution of Miami-Dade County’s Two-Tier Government: Have the Original Objectives Been Conserved?
Richard Levey, University of Central Florida; David Kanaan, University of Central Florida; Amanda Terry, University of Central Florida; M. Amoy Fraser, University of Central Florida

The Dynamics of Interlocal Cooperation: Comparing Preferences and Perceptions of Local Elected and Administrative Actors
Thomas Skuzinski, University of Michigan

Bridging the Gap: Planning Multi-Jurisdictional Infrastructure in an Era of Local Funding
David Weinreich, University of Mixhigan

Interlocal contracting for police and fire service in California cities, 2001-2010
Eric Zeemering, Northern Illinois University

Presenters
TF

Thomas Favre-Bulle

Stanford University, The Bill Lane Center for the American West
DK

David Kanaan

University of Central Florida
avatar for Thomas Skuzinski

Thomas Skuzinski

Doctoral Candidate + Researcher, University of Michigan
I research why alternative governance arrangements are chosen and how policies translate differently through these structures. My dissertation focuses on regionalism expressed as inter-local land use agreements in Michigan. What are the mechanisms driving attitudes of local elected officials and planners toward such arrangements? How do such arrangements transform land use practice and outcomes, if at all?
avatar for David Weinreich

David Weinreich

Doctoral Candidate, University of Michigan
Funding transportation infrastructure has become a major challenge, with decreasing federal interest in providing the money needed for expensive regional projects. My dissertation research examines strategies used to fund multi-jurisdictional transportation infrastructure solutions in the US. I am especially interested in self-help local taxes which were conducted across many counties at once--a change from poorly-coordinated county-by-county... Read More →
avatar for Eric Zeemering

Eric Zeemering

Northern Illinois University

Moderators
avatar for Eric Zeemering

Eric Zeemering

Northern Illinois University

Friday April 10, 2015 8:05am - 9:30am
Tuttle (lobby level)

8:05am

FR8.05.19 Health, Well-being, and the Built Environment
Moderator: Edith Barrett, University of Connecticut

Health Behaviors, Built Environment and Weight Gain across Immigrant Generations
Antwan Jones, The George Washington University; Hiromi Ishizawa, The George Washington University

Does Public Housing Make You Sick or do Low-Income Individuals Self-Select Into Public Housing?
Christian King, Georgia State University/Georgia Institute of Technology

Urban, young adult bariatric surgery patients: Post-operative alcohol use, depression and anxiety
Christine Spadola, Florida International University; Eric Wagner, Florida International University; Nicole Ruggiano, Florida International University; Denise Vidot, Florida International University; Nestor de la Cruz-Munoz, Florida International University; Sarah Messiah, Florida International University

A community greenway routed near schools in East Los Angeles, California: Recognizing children and youth as urban greenway users
Crystal Taylor, Florida State University

Presenters
avatar for Antwan Jones

Antwan Jones

Assistant Professor of Sociology and Africana Studies, The George Washington University
I am Dr. Antwan Jones, Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at The George Washington University. I received my B.A. in Sociology and African & African-American Studies from Duke University and my Ph.D. in Sociology from Bowling Green State University. While I am trained as a social demographer, my research examines various intersections in the areas of race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status and health. As an urban sociologist, I am... Read More →
CK

Christian King

University of Nebraska - Lincoln
CS

Christine Spadola

Florida International University
avatar for Crystal Taylor

Crystal Taylor

Visiting Assistant Professor, Florida State University
My research focuses on healthy and sustainable communities.

Moderators
avatar for Edith Barrett

Edith Barrett

Director, Urban and Community Studies, University of Connecticut

Friday April 10, 2015 8:05am - 9:30am
Cambridge (2nd floor)

9:30am

9:50am

PS1 Mental Slavery: The Faces of Power Understood through the Music of the Jamaican Urban Underclass
Music is more than a creative expression; it could represent the voice of a politically oppressed society. The potential power of music was recognized by Plato and is now confirmed by modern scientific inquiry. The majority of Jamaica’s people have been in a constant state of oppression to which they have responded, both individually and collectively, with resistance. One form through which resistance has taken place is music. Jamaica’s Reggae music was born in poor urban communities, evolved in the context of oppression, and are often commentaries on social conditions. The lyrics cover a range of related themes: past brutality and exploitation; present corruption; Marcus Garvey and his philosophy; a longing for the lost homeland and of hopes for repatriation in Africa. All fundamentally address the political, social and moral implications of the use of power from slavery to the present day. Using content analysis and a set of indicators of power, an examination of 30 of the leading Reggae songs of the past generation will be made to answer the question: “How does Reggae music explain Jamaica’s power dynamics in terms of Gaventa’s power dimensions?” The analysis aims to identify the existence of these dimensions of power, its potential for domination, its connections to the continued inequality of the country’s underclass, as well as avenues that the underclass can use to resist domination.

Presenters
CB

Craig Barham

PhD Student, University of Louisville, School of Urban and Public Affairs
I received my bachelor’s degree in Management and Economics from the University of the West Indies, Jamaica and a master’s degree in Public Administration from the University College of the Caribbean, also in Jamaica. I attended the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst in the United Kingdom and Junior Command and Staff School with the Canadian Armed Forces and served in the Jamaica Defence Force for nine years. I also worked in police oversight... Read More →


Friday April 10, 2015 9:50am - 10:30am
Biscayne Ballroom (2nd floor)

9:50am

PS10.0 Urban change and housing in Germany
Since the fall of the Berlin wall in 1989, Germany has experienced social, political, and economic changes that have impacted the urban environments and the housing landscape. While Germany has one of the lowest homeownership rates in Europe (ca. 40%), and its housing system is often regarded as the most affordable and liberal in Europe, its urban areas face problems that are in some ways similar to the US, for instance gentrification and homelessness on one hand, as well as progressive initiatives such as environmentally sustainable housing on the other. This research uses primary and secondary data, including photography, observation, documents, and population demographic data to examine 3 major cities in Germany – Berlin, Hamburg, and Kӧln – with particular emphasis on: • the history of German housing policy and its effect on urbanization and suburbanization, • topics such as gentrification, homelessness, and environmentally sustainable housing development, • the role of urban planning and regional development, • the role of arts and culture, • the effects of population/demographic change, • the role of government in achieving stable and affordable housing in spite of the global recession and global economic pressure. Lessons learned from this exploration of German urban change, urban planning, and culture in general have currency for the U.S., especially given its chronic affordable housing crisis and urban problems.

Presenters
avatar for Natasha Tursi

Natasha Tursi

Associate Director, Center for Urban Research and Education, Rutgers University


Friday April 10, 2015 9:50am - 10:30am
Biscayne Ballroom (2nd floor)

9:50am

PS11.0 Waking Up in Our Own House: Homeless Mothers’ Perspectives on Housing Stability and Child Well-Being
Despite growing levels of family homelessness and concern about its effects on child well-being, there has been a general lack of qualitative research exploring mechanisms by which housing instability influences child well-being. Qualitative data may also suggest ways to parse differences between the effects of housing instability itself and the environments families are exposed to while unstably housed. Semi-structured interviews with 80 homeless mothers enrolled in a random assignment study of housing interventions are used to explore these relationships. Differences among families assigned to short-term housing subsidies, long-term housing subsidies, and transitional housing interventions compared to a usual care condition of continuing to work with shelter staff to locate housing are also explored. Coding and data analysis of an initial ten family subset from the subsidy and usual care groups identified influences of housing stability and environments on child educational, behavioral, and health outcomes as well as mothers’ strategies for reducing negative influences. Mothers experiencing high housing instability attempted to minimize school changes, but preventing out-of-home placements was prioritized. Mothers frequently reported increased child behavior problems when living in shelters and overcrowded doubled-up situations often, but mothers who obtained housing subsidies frequently reported behavior problems abating quickly once their housing was stabilized. Mothers also often reported heterogeneity in outcomes for children within the same family. Implications of these findings for future quantitative studies of housing stability and child well-being are also explored, suggesting a need for increased use of person-centered approaches.

Presenters
SB

Scott Brown

Vanderbilt University


Friday April 10, 2015 9:50am - 10:30am
Biscayne Ballroom (2nd floor)

9:50am

PS12.0 Understanding the role of built design in neighborhood revitalization and stabilization
As neighborhood revitalization and stabilization continue to be a major focus of planners, developers, and design professionals, it becomes ever more important to understand the visual impact of these objectives. To comprehend when these efforts have exceeded their purpose, it is likewise necessary to be able to recognize the physical appearance of gentrification. The ability to understand and visually compare stabilization, revitalization, gentrification, and the visual boundaries between these concepts can assist those initiating and implementing neighborhood renewal. Visual recognition of the design tropes associated with gentrification prior to its actualization allows decision makers and implementers time to make modifications and ensure neighborhoods stabilize to support a diversity of incomes, ages, housing styles, services, and amenities. This research project attempts to develop an understanding through visual study and qualitative analysis of the appearance and resident perceptions of these important neighborhood development concepts and apply them to a long-term stabilized neighborhood, a newly developed neighborhood, and a neighborhood in transition. The findings of this research will provide a visual context and potential strategies for neighborhood revitalization and stabilization through implementation of mixed-income communities rather than gentrification.

Presenters
KD

Katherine Dostart

Iowa State University


Friday April 10, 2015 9:50am - 10:30am
Biscayne Ballroom (2nd floor)

9:50am

PS13.0 Buying In: Putting a Price on Urbanity in the Digital City
Housing prices tend to be higher in city centers than elsewhere. This phenomenon is known as the urban rent. The cause of this observed difference kindled a yet unsettled scientific dispute between two opposing models: Does urban rent stem from global economic speculation based on a location advantage, or is urban rent the result of an actors-driven valuation of central neighborhoods that leads to the augmentation of housing prices? This controversy is epitomized by the debate surrounding gentrification, i.e. the replacement of lower income inhabitants by higher income ones in poor neighborhoods. Two main models of gentrification have been proposed: the economic exogenous approach integrates gentrification in macro-scale speculation and the geographic micro-scale approach considers the neighborhood effect of high valued houses. These models describe how gentrification might happen, but fail to explain why neighborhoods suddenly become attractive although their locations do not changed. I propose to test the role of urbanity in the gentrification process so as to address this shortcoming. I am building an index of urbanity based on empirical observations (pre-existing density, social diversity and functional variety) and on residents’ aspirations for urbanity (evaluated according to their political choices and interviews). Moreover, I am building a statistical model to test the interaction between urbanity (both actual, measured urbanity and preferences for urbanity), macro-scale market dynamics and micro-scale local valuation. This model will test the following hypothesis : the level of urbanity changes the relative role of market dynamics and local valuation. I will present the first results of this research and the maps of my field study: San Francisco Bay Area.

Presenters
avatar for Luc Guillemot

Luc Guillemot

Postdoctoral scholar, University of California, Berkeley


Friday April 10, 2015 9:50am - 10:30am
Biscayne Ballroom (2nd floor)

9:50am

PS14.0 Transformation of Low-income Settlements into Public Housing: A Case of Kadifekale
Abstract What is the socioeconomic impact of an urban housing project on relocated residents? I will examine the socioeconomic impact of an urban housing project in Izmir, Turkey. Kadifekale is a neighborhood in Izmir where low-income migrants from the eastern part of Turkey move to, due to an increase in violence in eastern Turkey. Kadifekale has a predominance of residents of Kurdish origin who come from the Mardin Province in eastern Turkey. These migrants lived in illegal, low-income settlements for the long time, until the local government forced them to move into assigned public mobility housing in Uzundere, a housing project in the southern part of the city. Based on my ethnographic observations and 15 in-depth interviews in Uzundere resettling low-income migrants from Kadifekale into public mobility housing is an economic development case with strengths and challenges. These socioeconomic challenges include the lack of employment opportunities, as well as the lack of transportation and community amenities. In this paper, I will highlight an urban housing project in Turkey, and I will evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of this housing project based on stories from residents of Uzundere. Keywords: Urban Transformation, Public houses, Race and ethnicity, Migration, Turkey.

Presenters
avatar for Melis Kural

Melis Kural

University at Buffalo


Friday April 10, 2015 9:50am - 10:30am
Biscayne Ballroom (2nd floor)

9:50am

PS15.0 Do Affordable Homes Look Different?
The problem explored is if design can reduce opposition to affordable housing. Two hundred and nineteen people participated (99 men, and 120 women) in an on-line survey recruited through a snowball sample via social media. Most participants reported that they were Caucasian, a homeowner, married, well educated, with family incomes greater than $50,000. From the 186 respondents who reported their zip codes, I found that participants came from 34 states and Canada. The survey measured the participant’s willingness to allow affordable housing near them using a social distance scale. The survey also asked participants to choose which home they believed to be affordable between three market-rate homes and one affordable home. Half of the respondents completed the social distance scale as a pre-test, whereas everyone completed the social distance scale as a post-test. The research found that homeowners and higher-income individuals are less willing to have affordable housing near them than renters and lower-income individuals. Additionally, the research found that people are more willing to allow affordable housing near them after taking the survey. Therefore, under the right circumstances, providing a clear definition of affordable housing and building aesthetically pleasing and indistinguishable affordable housing can increase people’s willingness to allow affordable housing near them. This information proves valuable to developers, affordable housing agencies, and planners as the research has found that the architectural design of affordable housing could decrease stigma by participants being more willing to allow affordable housing near them. It is therefore, important for these actors to educate the community on who lives in affordable housing and how single-family affordable housing can be built indistinguishable from market-rate housing.

Presenters
CP

Cody Price

The Ohio State University


Friday April 10, 2015 9:50am - 10:30am
Biscayne Ballroom (2nd floor)

9:50am

PS16.0 Focus On Detroit: Films Representing and Explaining Detroit’s Crisis to the World
Narratives about Detroit are incredibly abundant. There are about 20 feature documentaries about Detroit that have been released in the last five years, along with many television reports and internet based video installations. These representations attempt to tell Detroit’s stories from many points of view. Here I review eight recent films to understand the points of view presented and how these films shape the narrative about Detroit’s crisis and possible strategies for revitalization. Recent scholarship has attempted to change the Detroit crisis plotline, notably Thomas Sugrue’s recent correction that Detroit’s crisis didn’t start with the Detroit uprising of 1967, but rather, was a reaction to a crisis that began in the late 1940s. This research required urban researchers to recalibrate “the origins of the urban crisis.” Detroit’s municipal bankruptcy and iconic visual representations of urban crisis have grabbed the world’s attention. This paper reviews both urban theories and film methods to explore how Detroit hi(stories) are represented. I review how consensus and or dissonance between academic historical and social science explorations and cinematic representations of Detroit’s decline and revitalization may matter in creating a more robust understanding of the complex problem of urban crisis. Here I include content analysis of eight films on Detroit, along with content analysis of major newspaper accounts of Detroit’s crisis – including its bankruptcy case – as well as blogs and other individual efforts to tell this story. I also compare this survey of recent films to recent surveys of books about Detroit and photography about Detroit. This paper contributes to our understanding of urban narratives and their effects on urban research and policy.

Presenters
avatar for Louise Jezierski

Louise Jezierski

Michigan State University
I have been a professor at Michigan State since 1997.My MA and PhD are in Sociology from UC Berkeley, and my BA is from Boston University in Sociology and Geography.


Friday April 10, 2015 9:50am - 10:30am
Biscayne Ballroom (2nd floor)

9:50am

PS18.0 Gentrification's Pace: How Senior Citizens are Affected in the Urban Core
The U.S. Census Bureau predicts over twenty percent of the U.S. population will be over age 65 by 2030, raising questions about whether this segment of the population will age in the homes they currently occupy. As the Generation X and millennial population continue to move back into the urban core, gentrification of once- disenfranchised neighborhoods results in major socioeconomic demographic shifts in neighborhood composition, driving up housing costs for longtime residents. Central Atlanta, like many other urban cores, has experienced and continues to experience a large residential shift as those over age 65 are displaced by the Generation X and millennial population. Through a focus on Atlanta’s historic patterns, this paper examines how those aged 65 and older are impacted by gentrification over time. The study uses a gentrification change index, using factors such as property value, home ownership rates, and resident education level over time, to assess the change in the 65 and older population in urban core neighborhoods, emphasizing differences in neighborhoods that have gentrified slowly in comparison to neighborhoods that have gentrified rapidly. Informed by focus group analysis, findings highlight neighborhood-specific and general best practices to improve urban core neighborhoods without displacing those 65 and older, with applicability to other core city communities across the United States.

Presenters
KW

Katherine Wilson

Georgia Institute of Technology


Friday April 10, 2015 9:50am - 10:30am
Biscayne Ballroom (2nd floor)

9:50am

PS21.0 Examining the Impact of 'Ban the Box' Policies on Hiring Processes
It is estimated that 65 million U.S. adults have criminal records, which equates to about one in four American adults. Of those incarcerated, more than half a million are released from prison annually. The ability to obtain stable employment is a primary factor in facilitating a successful transition to life after prison. However, studies show that Americans with criminal records face significant barriers to obtaining employment. One method to reduce barriers, such as hiring bias against job applicants with criminal records, involves legally barring employers from inquiring about criminal backgrounds on job applications. This method, commonly referred to as "Ban the Box," has been implemented among states and municipalities in the public sector, the private sector, or both. Ban the Box policies do not eliminate questions about applicants' criminal backgrounds, but simply delay questions until after job applicants have obtained an interview or a conditional job offer. Few studies have been conducted to examine the impact of Ban the Box policies on employers and job applicants. This pilot study uses a non-experimental design to examine employers' hiring experiences related to implementation of Ban the Box policies. An online survey of human resource departments in select states and municipalities where Ban the Box policies are in force was conducted. The goal of the research was to gather data about the type and extent of effects on hiring practices experienced by employers after implementation of Ban the Box policies. Anticipated outcomes are that few human resource departments will have experienced negative hiring impacts, such as increased costs, excess staff time, or increased workplace violence, after implementation of Ban the Box policies. The results of the pilot study will be presented via this poster presentation.

Presenters
avatar for Laura Bogardus

Laura Bogardus

Doctoral Student / Grad Asst / HR Chapter Operations Director, Clemson University
I have professional experience experience in workforce development, career development, fund development and human resources. My research interests include employment issues facing lower income individuals. I am interested in asset-based community development that supports holistic development of community members and institutions. | | I am also interested in corporate social responsibility and human rights issues, especially pertaining... Read More →


Friday April 10, 2015 9:50am - 10:30am
Biscayne Ballroom (2nd floor)

9:50am

PS23.0 Exclusionary Land Use Policies: A Path to Residential Segregation?
Residential segregation is a growing problem here in America. When you look around your city, most often you notice that neighborhoods are grouped into housing typologies and segregated in some form or fashion, primarily by income. The underlying assumption is that the poor live with the poor and the wealthy live with the wealthy. The poor areas of town are most often located in and around the areas of the city that are considered less desirable uses such as warehouse districts and manufacturing districts and distanced from greenbelts and other public amenities. One of the leading causes for residential segregation is the practice of exclusionary zoning regulations. Regulations such as minimum lot sizes, specific building materials, minimum set-backs, high impact fees, and zoning maps that restrict housing typologies or place limitations in different zones. The question is: how do exclusionary land use policies play a part in the institution of residential segregation? This paper will examine in a mixed methods approach utilizing case studies and quantitative data in several Texas cities. By mapping zoning regions over a period of time and analyzing housing values within those zone it is believed that it will be determined that exclusionary land use policies are a major factor in the institution of residential segregation. The goal of this research is the suggestion policies at the state level to begin to blur the lines created by exclusionary land use policies.

Presenters
JS

Jennifer Sloan

University of Texas at Arlington


Friday April 10, 2015 9:50am - 10:30am
Biscayne Ballroom (2nd floor)

9:50am

PS25.0 A tale of two cities? Citizenship and the privatization of security in Miami
My research is part of a larger comparative research project that looks into the relationships of contemporary security governance and the experience and enactment of citizenship in five different cities. More specifically, my research uses security as a case to expand our understanding of how and where new forms of citizenship are produced and existing ones reconfigured in the city of Miami. It departs from the understanding that citizenship is a social construct that can develop beyond the realm of the national state, for example in the relationships of rights and responsibilities between private security, neighborhood watches, and residents.

Rather than departing from the a priori presence of a clear-cut dichotomy between public and private and client and threat, my research is based upon an empirical understanding of security assemblages. This means that I perceive these theoretical conceptualizations to be much more fluid and intertwined as security providers and residents can represent multiple and different roles simultaneously.

Following this line of thinking, I will study to what extent roles and relationships are constructed in security encounters, as well as analyze how security encounters produce spatial meaning and regimes of mobility in order to theorize the production of citizenships. After 1,5 month of fieldwork, I have selected Overtown, Wynwood and South Beach as my main research locations.

By adopting an ethnographic methodological approach, I will be able to explore how police officers, private companies, neighborhood watches, and residents encounter each other as inherent and sometimes inescapable part of daily urban life. This allows me to uncover the narratives, interpretations, and experiences that inform and follow from these interactions.

Friday April 10, 2015 9:50am - 10:30am
Biscayne Ballroom (2nd floor)

9:50am

PS26.0 Community Policing: Bridging the gap between minority communities and the police force
In the wake of the tragedies of Michael Brown, Eric Garner, Ezell Ford and Trayvon Martin we are at an impasse in the way police function within the African American community. At one end of the spectrum police officers are responsible for maintaining law and order in society while still protecting themselves from harm. Simultaneously, the African American community feels unlawfully targeted by aggressive and unwarranted attacks by these same officers. With increased tensions building between the police officers and the African American community the problem must be addressed if we are to make any progress in mending the broken bound between the two. The most prominent quick fix to the current issue is for increased use of cameras. While this might have an immediate impact we want a solution that is lasting and uniform. This solution comes in the form of increased community policing in minority communities. Given the long-term solution proposed we must answer the question: How can we use community-policing tools to increase trust in minority communities? Previous community policing research has created theories but never advanced a framework that can be applicable in society. Through my study of case studies, ethnographic reports and community policing literature I will put together a framework that moves beyond theory and will be applicable and transparent in its use. This framework if applied correctly will be the catalyst for administrators to incorporate in their police force. This model will tackle the present issues facing the growing outrage between minority communities and the police force

Presenters
JW

James Wright II

American University


Friday April 10, 2015 9:50am - 10:30am
Biscayne Ballroom (2nd floor)

9:50am

PS27.0 Knowledge and Risk of Hepatitis C Infection among Latino Criminal Justice Clients in Miami, Florida
Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the most common chronic blood borne viral infection in the United States. Over 4 million Americans suffer from HCV, yet 75% of them are unaware of their illness. Rates of infection are high among criminal justice clients with rates estimated between 20-40%, and Latinos report the highest HCV-related mortality of incarcerated individuals. The present study aims are two-fold: 1) to assess knowledge of HCV among Latino criminal justice clients according to their interest in being tested for HCV; and 2) to describe the association of drug use and being interested in HCV testing. Data collection is on-going; however, preliminary findings (n = 44) show 80% are male, the mean age is 33 years (SD=9). Sixteen percent did not finish high school, 34% completed high school/GED, and 50% had some college or more. Around 45% of participants were of Cuban origin. Around 80% of the participants were arrested more than once. Knowledge of HCV risk factors were generally not high in this sample. For example, around 57% did not know that drug use is associated with higher risk, only 45% were extremely certain that tattooing is a risk factor. However, over 75% recognized that having fewer partners is not an effective protective measure, and around 60% thought it can be transmitted by sharing razors and toothbrushes. The majority of the participants (70%) did not know whether there is an effective HCV vaccine or not. Around 60% of the participants were interested in receiving HCV testing, but those who reported one or more drug related arrests were less likely to want HCV testing. Implications of the findings will be discussed as it relates to improving HCV testing, as well as a description of a culturally-appropriate intervention that is being developed for this at risk population in Miami.

Presenters
RA

Rehab Auf

Florida International University


Friday April 10, 2015 9:50am - 10:30am
Biscayne Ballroom (2nd floor)

9:50am

PS28.0 Towards a model of a multi-ethnic neighborhood
The prevailing literature on neighborhood segregation examines the location of a single ethnic, immigrant, or racial group within a focused place. This situation still applies in many instances, but there are other cases where more than one ethnic group shares the same space. Notions of superdiversity and multi-ethnicity have been addressed repeatedly in the literature but there are few models of how these conditions may operate on the ground. This poster proposes the development of such a schema which will be useful in conceptualizing multi-ethnic neighborhoods and positing the differences between them. Such a model will take into account the type of contact between ethnic groups inhabiting the same space, the degree and scale of clustering, the societal context, and the differences between residential and business clusters. This model will then offer case examples for each type. Further implications of what these different configurations may mean for ethnic cooperation, incorporation and advancement will be explored.

Presenters
avatar for David Kaplan

David Kaplan

Professor of Geography, Kent State University


Friday April 10, 2015 9:50am - 10:30am
Biscayne Ballroom (2nd floor)

9:50am

PS29.0 Racial Residential Segregation and Risky Sexual Behavior Among Non-Hispanic Blacks, National Survey of Family Growth, 2006-2010
Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are a significant public health problem with an estimated 19 million new STIs each year in the US. STIs disproportionately affect the non-Hispanic black community in the United States. Previous research has detailed how community factors influence STI transmission as well as individual behavior. Racial residential segregation is a community factor previously associated with several negative health outcomes. The objective of this study was to examine the association between racial residential segregation and risky sexual behavior among non-Hispanic blacks. Study data were from the US Census and the National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG), a nationally representative continuous survey of men and women 15-44 years of age in US households. Risky sexual behavior was defined as having two or more partners within the last 12 months and no condom use during last sex. Racial residential segregation in core-based statistical areas (CBSAs) was measured using five different dimensions of segregation. Of the 3,643 non-Hispanic black study participants, 15% engaged in risky sexual behavior. After controlling for covariates, the centralization [aOR (95% CI): 2.07 (2.05-2.08)] and concentration [2.05 (2.03-2.07)] dimensions were found to be most strongly associated with risky sexual behavior. The associations between risky sexual behavior and two of the other dimensions – unevenness [1.16 (1.15-1.17)] and exposure [1.04 (1.03-1.05)] – were statistically significant but smaller in magnitude. The association between risky sexual behavior and racial residential segregation was stronger for females than males. The study findings suggest that racial residential segregation or factors associated with it may increase the prevalence of risky sexual behavior. Future research should examine mechanisms such as male-female ratio, incarceration rates, drug use, and discrimination by which racial residential segregation influences risky sexual behavior.

Presenters
KL

Khaleeq Lutfi

Florida International University


Friday April 10, 2015 9:50am - 10:30am
Biscayne Ballroom (2nd floor)

9:50am

PS3.0 How art museums influence who uses, and how people use neighborhood space
Art museums have traditionally been viewed as spaces that contribute to urban spatial inequality, because they are designed for and serve the agendas of urban elites. However, many in the museum community see art museums as enriching spaces for everyone in the city, not just elites. My research looks at how one particular art museum, the Portland Art Museum in Oregon, fits into this discussion by studying how it influences who uses, and how people use the mixed-income neighborhood space in and nearby the museum. For this research, I am piloting an Instagram-based method to understand who uses and how someone uses public space in and nearby the museum. Instagram offers an objective account of how and when someone uses space, and it can also be used to estimate the socio-economic status of the person. While my research also uses interviews with people to describe their activities and socio-economic statuses, this evidence depends on the truthfulness and subjective experience of the interviewee. More specifically, my Instagram method compares publicly available, anonymous Instagram photographs taken when the museum is closed versus open and when the museum is free versus when the museum charges admission. The photographs are analyzed for content and the Instagram users’ home census tracts are geolocated and joined with 2010 US Census data using QGIS. The resultant evidence is used to test whether each condition (closed versus open, free versus not free) attracts significantly different people and/or influences significantly different activities. The findings of this research will help community members, city boosters, museum staff, and city planners create more egalitarian places in and around existing art museums by understanding how the institution attracts diverse community groups versus elite groups, local groups versus outside groups, as well as how it influences certain neighborhood activities.

Presenters
avatar for Justin Meyer

Justin Meyer

PhD Candidate, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor


Friday April 10, 2015 9:50am - 10:30am
Biscayne Ballroom (2nd floor)

9:50am

PS30.0 Neighborhood characteristics and cause of death among HIV-positive Latinos, Florida, 2000-2011
PURPOSE: The objective was to examine underlying cause of death for HIV-positive Latinos by neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES), rural/urban status, and racial/ethnic composition. METHODS: Florida HIV surveillance records for Latinos diagnosed between 2000-2011 were analyzed. Vital status and cause of death was obtained by linkage with Florida Vital Records. Zip code at time of HIV diagnosis was used to link neighborhood SES variables and racial/ethnic composition from the American Community Survey to each case. The Rural-Urban Commuting Area (RUCA) codes were used to determine rural/urban status. RESULTS: Of 14,210 HIV-positive Latinos, 96.8% resided in an urban zip code. Of 1,899 deaths, 58.7% were HIV-related, 28.2% other medical (e.g. cancer, stroke, diabetes), 6.1% external (e.g. homicide, suicide, unintentional injuries), and 7.1% unknown. In the bivariate analysis, cause of death differed by year of HIV diagnosis (p-value

Presenters
DM

Diana M. Sheehan

Florida International University


Friday April 10, 2015 9:50am - 10:30am
Biscayne Ballroom (2nd floor)

9:50am

PS31.0 Everyday place making among neighborhood residents
The “It City” moniker presents Nashville as a booming market, open for business and ready for development. Alternative narratives posit the emergence of a “second” Nashville alongside the prosperous one that is characterized by economic inequity, social injustice, and gentrification. Indeed, this second Nashville exemplifies place as a creation of global capitalism, racism and patriarchy (Smith 1996; Lefebvre 1974; Harvey 1996; Massey 1994). While this structural lens provides important context and is critical to our understanding of the city system, its writing of the city under-represents its permeability, multiplicity, and unfinished nature, and possibility for its reimagination (Massey 1994; Gibson-Graham 2006). As spatial theories offer, cities are made and remade, assembled, and the fluid creation of its constituents (Neely & Samura 2011; Soja 1996; Deleuze & Guattari 1987). The present study considers this third place-making process and traces it through the discourse and behaviors of residents and stakeholders in a Nashville neighborhood. Adopting a critical place inquiry lens (Tuck & McKenzie 2014) using depth interviews, participant observation, and document analysis, I explore the ways that these actors preserve and create place in the context of urban change. Specifically, I ask, what are resident and stakeholder place meanings and attachments in relation to the neighborhood and what behaviors do they enact that reflect these definitions and relationships. Further, I consider how the process of everyday place making reflects the construction of, following the framework of Neely and Samura (2011), racial space. This research intends to contribute to a deeper understanding of urban systems, reframe residents as generators of place not simply inhabitants of gentrifying neighborhoods, and offer an alternative approach to conceptualizing the booming but fragmented city.

Presenters
JG

Jyoti Gupta

Vanderbilt University


Friday April 10, 2015 9:50am - 10:30am
Biscayne Ballroom (2nd floor)

9:50am

PS32.0 Finding a link between brownfields revitalization and equitable development in Southeast Florida region
Disproportionate burdens of environmental hazards and gentrification effect of brownfields revitalization have imposed unequal quality of living conditions on people of color with relatively low economic status. The concept of Equitable Development in planning academia and practice focuses on this issue through community-based redevelopment that emphasizes community engagement in planning process and building partnerships among diverse stakeholders. However, government agencies such as Environmental Protection Agency demands guidance to effectively work with local/grass root initiatives representing local communities’ need. Community involvement strategies need systematic and active intervention. This paper has two research questions: (1) what factors of brownfields neighborhoods should be considered as criteria to define environmentally and socioeconomically burdened population? (2) What type of partnership can be a model to facilitate equitable brownfields revitalization? And what kind of constituent should consist of such partnership to be sustained? Southeast Florida region – Indian River, St. Lucie, Martin, Palm Beach, Broward, Miami-Dade and Monroe Counties – consists of 65-percent people of color and has the largest number of brownfields/Superfund sites in Florida; thus, the region’s way to reach sustainable development heavily depends on the capability to embrace diversity of population and get abandoned properties back to productive use through community-based revitalization. Therefore, this study selects this region as a case study area and will conduct research to develop criteria to define environmentally disadvantaged population in this region and collect best brownfields revitalization practices, which have similar context to this region.

Presenters
JS

Jeniffer Shin

University of Florida


Friday April 10, 2015 9:50am - 10:30am
Biscayne Ballroom (2nd floor)

9:50am

PS34.0 Brazil, Distributed Generation, and the Geopolitics of Global Energy
As a regional leader and energy producer, Brazil’s geopolitical role in the emerging post-carbon global energy landscape is likely to grow. The current international energy system is challenged by constraints on available resources and the rise of new players. Local availability of clean secure energy sources is critical in not only protecting against volatility in international energy trade, but also in supporting municipalities that are straining under the pressure of increasing urban growth and demands on basic services. Rising demand for energy further exacerbates the challenges that climate change poses to urban areas. While the infrastructure costs of transitioning to more sustainable energy service systems can be great, adoption of generation sources such as photovoltaic and wind allows small economic actors to develop new innovative energy projects that meet local needs with local resources. This research explores the potential for urban distributed energy generation facilities in Brazil, the growth of which positions the country to be a leader in the emerging reconfiguration of energy supply and demand. Distributed generation facilities redefine how urban energy services are planned and executed while also eroding established patterns in the global flows of energy and the accompanying energy oriented capital investments.

Presenters
AB

Allison Bridges

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey


Friday April 10, 2015 9:50am - 10:30am
Biscayne Ballroom (2nd floor)

9:50am

PS4.0 Tacos, Generators, and Revitalization: How Oklahoma City Food Truck Vendors Navigate Local Regulation
The presence of food trucks in Oklahoma City has increased rapidly over the past few years, and food trucks appear to play a role in the revitalization efforts of several commercial districts in Oklahoma City through the use of regular street festivals. One monthly event in particular has even been titled “America’s Largest Food Truck Festival.” However, Oklahoma City’s food trucks have worked to overcome restrictive ordinances and the concern of local public health officials, including an armed raid by local health officials on a street festival in 2011. This study seeks to identify the regulatory barriers for food trucks in Oklahoma City, and how the city’s food truck operators perceive, manage and overcome these barriers. Qualitative methods, including semi-structured interviews with local food truck operators and participant observation of food truck sites and street festivals, are used in this study to examine how these regulations play out in public spaces. Initial findings have shown an active community of food truck operators who have worked with local officials to change several restrictive policies. Another finding has shown commercial district organizations and business improvement districts as key partners in securing permission to use public space and mitigating tensions with brick and mortar restaurants. Though current literature on food trucks and street vending in the United States has generally argued for a more laissez-faire approach to regulating food truck vendors, this study has shown Oklahoma City food trucks to successfully operate within a formalized network of permits, inspections, and dialogue with local officials.

Presenters
avatar for James Eldridge

James Eldridge

University of Oklahoma
I'm an City Planning Master's student interested in public space, street vending, food systems, and economic development.


Friday April 10, 2015 9:50am - 10:30am
Biscayne Ballroom (2nd floor)

9:50am

PS5.0 Youth are making life decisions in New Jersey Public Schools
The nation is facing a crisis with nearly 4 million unfilled jobs due to unqualified candidates to secure specific occupational duties. According to the 2010 U.S. Census data, the state of New Jersey is aiding the crisis. There are approximately 1.1 million high school dropouts living in New Jersey, which is more than 12.3 percent of New Jersey’s population. This means that millions of citizens residing in New Jersey lack the skills and knowledge these jobs require to succeed in the job market of today. Over the years, research has illustrated that the General Education Development Test (GED) is becoming more and more popular amongst teenagers who drop out of New Jersey public high schools. The reasons why youth are opting out of high school into GED programs or alternative schools can be perceived as a community development problem. It could be that urban public school personnel did not properly inform students of the GED program or alternative school option before shifting them out. Other suggestions may reveal that youth are unaware of how human resource managers could scrutinize their GED education prior to securing employment. Some may also say youth are unaware of certain senior university’s strict policies that require GED students to graduate from a junior college first, before entering into the senior university. These misconceptions amongst youth about the GED test may be due to some organizational issues within the public school district. If so, research could potentially lead to a revision within the urban public school districts, not the GED test.

Presenters
avatar for Danielle Davis

Danielle Davis

Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey
Danielle Davis is a graduate student in the Master’s of Public Administrations (MPA) program at Rutgers University, Camden campus. | | Prior to starting her graduate studies, Danielle received her Associates degree in Paralegal studies at Berkeley College. After completion, she transferred to Rutgers, Camden where she obtained her undergraduate degree in Liberal Studies with a minor in Criminal Justice. Upon graduation, Danielle acquired a... Read More →


Friday April 10, 2015 9:50am - 10:30am
Biscayne Ballroom (2nd floor)

9:50am

PS35.0 Urban Agriculture (UA): Innovative Use of Private Property for the Public Good
Rania Ahmed, University of San Francisco; Alicia Lehmer, University of San Francisco

Cities have turned to urban agriculture (UA) as a means of revitalizing neighborhoods and addressing unmet food needs of urbanites. Farming in the city has gained momentum and has become an impactful force on urban social landscapes, economics and health. However, UA has also sparked debates over the appropriate development of highly valuable private spaces in order to achieve public good. In 2014, the City of San Francisco created a tax incentive to encourage property owners to use undeveloped lands in UA that can provide increased food access to local communities. This tax incentive represents the political prioritization of UA in the City of San Francisco to meet a pressing residential need. Nonetheless, opposition to the tax incentive raises significant questions: What is the role of UA in a global city with a severe housing crisis? What institutional support does incentivizing UA need to address a public demand on extremely scarce urban land? This paper examines these questions through the analysis of qualitative data gathered through interviews with impacted San Francisco residents, nonprofits, and landowners; the analysis of public documents; and a review of the existing literature on the costs and benefits of UA in the United States. Existing literature indicates that UA can help revitalize disinvested neighborhoods and provide supplemental nutrition and food access to low-income residents suffering from food insecurity. In addition to these community benefits, we posit that public policies that incentivize UA benefit urban residents by providing a unique opportunity for cities to reframe the relationship between the public and private spheres in shaping the urban landscape. Findings include policy structures that make UA a favorable land use for public officials, landowners, and residents alike to create new public/private dynamics, promote public good, health, and cultivating social,rather than private, capital within the city.

Presenters
RA

Rania Ahmed

Ecocity Builders


Friday April 10, 2015 9:50am - 10:30am
Biscayne Ballroom (2nd floor)

9:50am

PS36.0 Evaluation framework for a new model of integrated sociomedical outreach at Florida International University
Evidence points to non-biologic social factors as the principal determinants of health. The US health care system spends more than any other health care system in the world, yet this results in poorer health outcomes in the US compared with other industrialized nations. Many have noted that clinical services in the US are poorly organized, while social services are under-funded compared with other industrialized countries. Green Family Foundation NeighborhoodHELP™ is a new model of care initially developed to train interprofessional teams of FIU students, comprised of medical, social work, law, nursing, public health, and education. The program employs a socio-medical approach to improve health at the household level. The outreach team combines the health service support of community health workers and the social service support of health navigators. The outreach team recruits and engages community partners and households; provides community, health, and social navigation services, and referrals for health, legal, educational and/or social services, based on household needs. The outreach team also works with partners to leverage local community assets to meet the needs of community partners and households. An initial evaluation of our curricular model demonstrated that outreach services could reduce the use of ER as a usual source of care. This outreach model is now being formalized, expanded and integrated with the broader FIU health network targeting the Triple Aim: improving the patient experience of care; improving health; and reducing costs. To prospectively evaluate the impact and value of outreach services, we carefully analyzed workflows. We are building a data management system to accurately reflect the activities and outcomes of this new outreach team. This poster will present workflows, evaluation data elements, and the analysis framework for prospective and ongoing evaluation of costs and outcomes of integrating sociomedical outreach into clinical care.

Presenters
avatar for David Brown

David Brown

Chief of Family Medicine, Florida International University Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine
I have had a leading role in the development of the award winning NeighborhoodHELP outreach program.


Friday April 10, 2015 9:50am - 10:30am
Biscayne Ballroom (2nd floor)

9:50am

PS37.0 PROJECT TREBLE: An Examination of an Innovative Music Education Program for Promoting Resilience among Urban Minority Youth
There is a pressing need for effective and engaging strengths-based prevention models that promote resilience among at-risk urban youth. Music education is a promising vehicle, though often less available and underfunded in high-poverty, disadvantaged schools. Youth involvement in musical training appears to enhance the development of critical life-skills such as discipline, self-control and perseverance. Such life skills are linked to lower rates of substance use, and improved GPA, self-confidence, and conduct. To examine these issues, the Ware Foundation funded “Project TREBLE” (Testing Resilience in an Ensemble-Based Learning Environment), a collaboration between the Florida International University’s Community-Based Intervention Research Group (C-BIRG) and the Miami Music Project (MMP). MMP, founded by world-renowned conductor James Judd, is an innovative music education program that provides free after-school ensemble-based musical instruction to urban minority youth across Miami-Dade County. The purpose of Project TREBLE is a rigorous examination of how participation in MMP impacts the lives of youth. Incorporating a Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) approach, we successfully engaged the MMP community and met recruitment goals for year 1. Students (n= 59), their parents, and their MMP music teachers were followed over the course of the school year. Preliminary results are interesting. Project TREBLE student participants were age 8 to 17 years old, 44% female, 83% Hispanic, and 27% foreign born. Most parents (> 80%) reported noticeable improvement in their child’s life skills across a variety of domains including confidence, concentration, time management, creativity, self-esteem, communication and leadership. Parents attributed these gains to their children’s participation in MMP. Preliminary results suggest that involvement in this innovative and accessible music education program has a powerful positive impact on youth life skills.

Presenters
MH

Michelle Hospital

Florida International University


Friday April 10, 2015 9:50am - 10:30am
Biscayne Ballroom (2nd floor)

9:50am

PS38.0 Health Care for All: A Case Study of a Local Health Alliance and its Pursuit of Better Health Outcomes While Reducing Costs
Rising healthcare costs have become a topic of discussion in recent years among policy makers, researchers, and practitioners. Aside from the unsustainable trajectory of costs in light of fiscal crises, the burden has dampened the reach of economic recovery efforts in distressed post-industrial cities such as Camden, New jersey. Over time, the city’s hospital emergency departments have seen a disproportionate number of people reporting with conditions most efficiently treated and best suited for a primary care setting. A fragmented and ill-incentivized system of care has lead to patients lost in navigating their way through what is simultaneously the most advanced and costliest healthcare system in the world. This study will attempt to analyze and evaluate a local grass-roots initiative charge lead by the Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers (CCHP). In particular, CCHP’s Care Management Program targets the so-called “high service utilizer” population across Camden City. Predominantly lower income and minority, these individuals (and their families) face a variety of medical and environmental hardships. As a result, a relatively narrow subsection of patients account for the highest proportion in E.R. visits throughout the city, in great part due to haphazard and uncoordinated care patterns, to the detriment of municipal finances. Initial findings show that the program has resulted in a meaningful reduction in unnecessary E.R. visits since its inception in 2007. Furthermore, the paper delves into finding a more meaningful conceptualization and measurement of the level of self-empowerment and health capital creation within selected neighborhoods targeted by the CMP program. The paper ends with public health policy implications by elucidating some of the ways intervention models or high-patient-impact approaches achieve better health outcomes through better data utilization (and GIS tools) while leading to a sustaining downward bend in the healthcare cost curve.

Presenters
avatar for Straso Jovanovski

Straso Jovanovski

PhD Candidate, Public Affairs (Community Development track), Rutgers University - Camden
I am interested in community-level health care delivery; studying the impact of health care initiatives and programs targeted at vulnerable populations in the distressed urban environment. I like using GIS mapping software in portraying trends and patterns relating to health care disparities.


Friday April 10, 2015 9:50am - 10:30am
Biscayne Ballroom (2nd floor)

9:50am

PS39.0 Food Deserts and County-Level Health Outcomes: An Analysis of The 28-County Metropolitan Atlanta Area
A socioecological perspective argues that social environment can influence health outcome. In fact, previous research on food deserts and individual health outcomes supports that the built environment influences the dietary habits of residents. Our initial research explores prevalence of food deserts, diabetes, and obesity to determine if there is a significant relation between the incidence rates at the county-level. This differs from previous examinations into food deserts and health outcomes. The question that we seek to answer is does the presence of food deserts represent a tacit policy approach to (re)development that jeopardizes the health outcomes of residents outside of food deserts. Using the variables provided by the Partnership for Southern Equity’s Metro-Atlanta Equity Atlas, our findings were that there is a statistical relationship between high levels of low-income food deserts and high incidence of diabetes. There is also a statistical relationship with high prevalence of captive mobility food deserts and obesity. From these results, we believe that low-income served as a proxy variable for food insecurity, which complicates compliance with diabetic dietary restrictions, and that captive mobility reflected a policy approach to public transportation and neighborhood planning. Our subsequent investigation will analyze the relevant county policies. Specifically, for captive mobility, we will include measures of walkability, sidewalk connectivity, and methods of community to work. In assessing the connection between food deserts and health outcomes, it is important to investigate the policies and regulations that led to the creation of food deserts. In this way, we can prevent further desertification of neighborhoods. Moreover, emerging research has shown that there is a link between negative health outcomes and food deserts; therefore, using the presence of food deserts may serve as an indicator of overall community health.

Presenters
avatar for Jason Plummer

Jason Plummer

Lecturer, California State University, Los Angeles


Friday April 10, 2015 9:50am - 10:30am
Biscayne Ballroom (2nd floor)

9:50am

PS40.0 Landscape Anthropometrics: A multi-scale approach to integrating health into regional land use planning
The explication of “healthy places” is a fragmented endeavor, split along three axes. The first dichotomy exists in the anthropocentric vs. biocentric philosophies to defining healthy places. The second rift is evident in the reductionist methods and metrics employed to evaluate contextual impacts on human health. The third gap is with respect to scale. While there is abundant research investigating health and the built environment at the neighborhood scale, connections at the regional scale remain largely unexplored. This research creates a consistent, scalable approach for incorporating health considerations into regional land planning for metropolitan areas. A prototypical framework is presented for the Atlanta metropolitan region. Determinants of healthy places from Social/Landscape Epidemiology, Urban Planning and Landscape Ecology are incorporated into defining landscape pattern metrics. Key research objectives are to — 1) provide a new method to measuring urban form and health relationships through the use of landscape metrics 2) analyze urban form to understand optimal configuration, mix, spatial distribution, complementary juxtapositions and proportions of land uses and socioeconomic factors that can support better health outcomes. Methodologically, this research examines associations between landscape patterns at multiple scales (metro, county and tract) with health outcomes measured by mortality rates across numerous chronic conditions. Two primary research questions are explored— 1) Are landscape patterns significant determinants of mortality rates? 2) At what scale do landscape patterns matter for reduced mortality rates? Descriptive analyses include the use of clustering techniques to identify spatial dependencies and signatures. Hierarchical impacts of regional land use patterns on local health outcomes is examined through multilevel modeling. The aim is to present a succinct set of landscape metrics for sustainable land use planning in the long term.

Presenters
AR

Arthi Rao

Georgia Institute of Technology


Friday April 10, 2015 9:50am - 10:30am
Biscayne Ballroom (2nd floor)

10:30am

FR10.30.00 The Challenges of Interdisciplinarity in Urban Studies programs
This colloquy invites open discussion on the challenges of initiating and maintaining interdisciplinary urban studies programs. How are curricular demands that involve required courses in other departments maintained? What strategies are there for improving relationships with other academic units? In an era of budget cuts and limited resources, how are interdisciplinary programs making the argument for their necessity?

Presenters
JA

Jasmine Alinder

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
avatar for Robert Blair

Robert Blair

Associate Professor of Public Administration and Urban Studies, University of Nebraska at Omaha
I am passionate about professional local government management and the potential of its application to other countries, respecting their traditions, history, and political culture. I am also less passionate about the Chicago Cubs
RE

Renia Ehrenfeucht

University of New Orleans
LR

Laura Reese

Michigan State University

Moderators
JA

Jasmine Alinder

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Friday April 10, 2015 10:30am - 11:55am
Oxford (2nd floor)

10:30am

FR10.30.02 Methodological challenges and associated key research findings: The payoff of tackling complex and labor-intensive data issues
The Making Connections initiative, funded by the Annie E. Casey Foundation (AECF), sought to improve outcomes for disadvantaged children by strengthening their families, improving their neighborhoods, and raising the quality of local services. The Making Connections Survey was designed to provide information about how neighborhood change affects the well-being of children and families. The Making Connections Survey data are of great interest to researchers in the fields of economics, psychology, public health, public policy, social work, and sociology. Survey topics include mobility, social capital and networks, neighborhood processes, resident perceptions and participation, economic hardship, the availability and utilization of services and resources, and child and adolescent well-being. The survey was conducted in Denver, Des Moines, Indianapolis, San Antonio, Seattle (White Center), Hartford, Milwaukee, Oakland, Providence, and Louisville. The baseline survey was fielded in each of the ten Making Connections neighborhoods, and in each county that contained a Making Connections neighborhood. The Wave 2 survey was fielded in the neighborhoods only. Baseline data were gathered between 2002 and 2004. Wave 2 was completed between 2005 and 2007 in the same ten sites. The Wave 3 cycle, scheduled between 2008 and 2011, was conducted in seven of the ten sites. Research using the survey data offers valuable guidance, not only for community development practitioners and neighborhood groups in the field, but also for state and federal officials who develop guidelines about best practices for community policy. This colloquy will present the methodological challenges faced over the ten year period, the decisions made along the way about the data we were collecting and preparing for analysis, and the rich research findings associated with meeting and overcoming the challenges to broaden and improve the scope and usefulness of the data.

Presenters
DB

Daniel Brisson

University of Denver
CC

Claudia Coulton

Case Western Reserve University
RG

Robert Goerge

Chapin Hall Center for Children
BT

Brett Theodos

Urban Institute
EZ

Emily Zimmerman

Virginia Commonwealth University

Moderators
NE

Ned English

NORC, University of Chicago

Friday April 10, 2015 10:30am - 11:55am
Hibiscus (lobby level)

10:30am

FR10.30.07 Urban Research and Activism: Housing and Community Development
A houser, an activist and an urban scholar walk into a bar…This colloquy will examine the identity politics and practice of housing and community development activism and scholarship. This session brings together housing and community development activist scholars who will reflect on the challenges associated with balancing teaching, research, and activism within the academy. In a world characterized by “posts”- housing crisis, racism, public housing- what does it mean to simultaneously tackle urban housing and community development issues as researchers and advocates? How are these relationships further altered by institutional affiliations within higher education, especially now with even more pressures to bring research funding in and pushing scholarly publications out? This colloquium invites a discussion about the negotiation of these relationships in light of broader changes to both the academic and housing landscapes, and also how we as “veterans” help develop the next generation of activist scholars that can walk the tightrope of being both relevant and forward leaning.

Presenters
avatar for Lisa Bates

Lisa Bates

Portland State University
avatar for Andrew Greenlee

Andrew Greenlee

Assistant Professor, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
KN

Kathe Newman

Rutgers University
SS

Susan Saegert

City University of New York
avatar for Janet Smith

Janet Smith

University of Illinois Chicago
avatar for Elizabeth Sweet

Elizabeth Sweet

Geography and Urban Studies, Temple University

Moderators
avatar for Janet Smith

Janet Smith

University of Illinois Chicago

Friday April 10, 2015 10:30am - 11:55am
Alhambra (2nd floor)

10:30am

FR10.30.15 Assessing the Role of the State in the Contemporary Urban
Much of our recent thinking about the urban in the contemporary era fails to engage the question of the role of state in explicit and rigorous terms. This colloquy seeks to begin to address this lamentable lacuna. The issue of state power will be interrogated from a variety of theoretical and empirical perspectives, including Marxian, post-structural, liberal-progressive-reformist, etc. The goal is to begin a conversation that clarifies our thinking about the proper role of the state in a potentially emancipatory future for cities and their publics.

Presenters
avatar for Jonathan S. Davies

Jonathan S. Davies

Professor of Critical Policy Studies, De Montfort University
I am Professor of Critical Policy Studies in the Department of Politics and Public Policy at De Montfort. My research interests span critical issues in governance, state theory, urban studies and public policy. I am currently working on a variety of projects on crisis, austerity governance and contestation. From April 2015 I will be leading an international consortium of researchers in an ESRC funded eight-case comparative study of austerity... Read More →
LG

Leigh Graham

John Jay College of Criminal Justice
DI

David Imbroscio

University of Louisville
RL

Robert Lake

Rutgers University
AM

Ali Modarres

Director, Urban Studies, University of Washington Tacoma

Moderators
DI

David Imbroscio

University of Louisville

Friday April 10, 2015 10:30am - 11:55am
Flagler (lobby level)

10:30am

FR10.30.17 Convention Center Follies and the Study of Urban Politics
This session will present the central findings of Heywood Sanders' new book, Convention Center Follies, offer a variety of responses and critiques of the case histories of downtown development efforts in Chicago, Atlanta, and St. Louis, and seek to develop a framework for examining and explaining American urban politics in the 21st century.

Presenters
ML

Marc Levine

University of Wisconsin Milwaukee
MR

Mark Rose

Florida Atlantic University
HS

Heywood Sanders

University of Texas at San Antonio
BW

Bob Whelan

University of Texas-Dallas

Moderators
MR

Mark Rose

Florida Atlantic University

Friday April 10, 2015 10:30am - 11:55am
Dupont (lobby level)

10:30am

FR10.30.20 Getting Tenure/Promotion II- Research/Publication Strategies.
It has been said that "publications are the currency of tenure" and academics are all too familiar with the phrase "publish or perish." For new faculty, the publishing process can be quite opaque and daunting. This colloquy will provide a discussion of strategies for developing a high quality research agenda that results in publications. Panelist will discuss approaches and pitfalls for initiating or continuing a research, writing, and publication process.

Presenters
CA

Caroline Andrew

The University of Ottawa
EG

Edward Goetz

University of Minnesota
ML

Mickey Lauria

Clemson University
KM

Karen Mossberger

Arizona State University, United States of America
TS

Todd Swanstrom

University of Missouri-St. Louis
avatar for Jocelyn Taliaferro

Jocelyn Taliaferro

Associate Professor & Director of The Graduate Program, North Carolina State University
If you only look at what is, you might never attain what could be!

Moderators
avatar for Jocelyn Taliaferro

Jocelyn Taliaferro

Associate Professor & Director of The Graduate Program, North Carolina State University
If you only look at what is, you might never attain what could be!

Friday April 10, 2015 10:30am - 11:55am
Trinity (2nd floor)

10:30am

FR10.30.01 The Context, Scale and Transferability of Housing Policies in the Global South
Given vast differences in governance systems and the context of urbanization, a variety of approaches to addressing housing challenges is expected. From land sharing schemes in Cambodia, to inclusionary zoning in Indonesia, to the housing provident fund in China, a multitude of innovations in housing policies have potential benefits outside their country of origin. In order to bring a comparative lens to the topic and critically assess policies' potential transferability, the International Journal of Housing Policy (IJHP) is sponsoring a panel at the UAA conference in Miami on Housing Policy Innovations in the Global South. The panel is composed of five papers that address issues associated with the specific context and transferability of housing policies across diverse regions in the global south. The first paper addresses problems associated with low income condominiums and the administration of common property, drawing on case studies in South American cities. The second paper also focuses on market orientated housing policy transformations, with an emphasis on Brazil and the implementation of the MInha Casa MInha Vida Program. The third paper takes a more global approach looking at the implementations of micro units as a means to deal with housing affordability and supply problems. Papers four and five meanwhile turn attention to improving the living conditions of very low income households and families in india. While the first deals with community led slum upgrading, the second considers squatter housing and its role in disaster recovery areas.


Common Property Maintenance of Low-Income Condominiums: Comparing Bogota, Colombia and Quito, Ecuador
Rosa Elena Donoso Gómez, Delft University of Technology

The MInha Casa MInha Vida Program and the Restructuring of Real Estate Sector: Twelve Years of Housing Policy in Brazil
Aduato Lucio Cardoso, IPPUR/UFRJ Brazil; Thêmis Amorim Aragão, IPPUR/UFRJ Brazil

Scalable community-led slum upgrading? The Indian Alliance and community toilet blocks in Mumbai
Richard Tomlinson, Urban Planning, Faculty of Architecture, Building and Planning, University of Melbourne, Australia


Resilience at the margins: Policy push for post-disaster squatter housing recovery
Anuradha Mukherji, Department of Geography, Planning, and Environment, East Carolina University

Presenters
AL

Adauto Lucio Cardoso

IPPUR/UFRJ Brazil
AM

Anuradha Mukherji

Department of Geography, Planning, and Environment, East Carolina University
avatar for Richard Tomlinson

Richard Tomlinson

Professor, Chair in Urban Planning, University of Melbourne
Slum upgrading in developing countries | Metropolitan governance (worldwide) | Global cities and governance | The Web, 'best practice' and 'knowledge products'

Moderators
avatar for Richard Ronald

Richard Ronald

Professor, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Friday April 10, 2015 10:30am - 11:55am
Balmoral (2nd floor)

10:30am

FR10.30.03 Housing, Health and Overall Well-being
Moderator: Nicole Ruggiano, Florida International University

Understanding Early Implementation of Moving to Work Resident Work Requirements
Kirstin P. Frescoln, Department of City and Regional Planning, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Michael D. Webb, Center for Urban and Regional Studies, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; William M. Rohe, Department of City and Regional Planning, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Does Traffic Calming Measures Produce Higher Property Values, Safer Streets, Greater Business Activity along with Reduction in Crime and Foreclosures?
Emmanuel Frimpong Boamah, University of Louisville; John Gilderbloom, University of Louisville; William Riggs, California Polytechnic State University; Keith Wresinski, University of Louisville

Not so Myopic Consumers - Evidence on Capitalization of Energy Technologies in a Housing Market
Oskari Harjunen, Aalto University and City of Helsinki; Matti Liski,

Growing Older in Miami: Perspectives and Concerns from a Diverse Sample of Urban Baby Boomers
Nicole Ruggiano, Florida International University; Fiorella Chirito, Florida International University; Andreja Lukic, Florida International University; Janice O'Driscoll, Florida International University; Kathy Sias, Florida International University

Presenters
EF

Emmanuel Frimpong Boamah

University of Louisville
avatar for Kirstin Frescoln

Kirstin Frescoln

PhD Candidate, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
My work focuses on community engagement to improve health and well-being for vulnerable populations. My current work is focused in public housing. I am the former North Carolina State Drug Treatment Court Manager and continue to provide national consultation on local, state, and national treatment court issues.
avatar for Oskari Harjunen

Oskari Harjunen

Aalto University and City of Helsinki
NR

Nicole Ruggiano

Florida International University

Moderators
NR

Nicole Ruggiano

Florida International University

Friday April 10, 2015 10:30am - 11:55am
Sandringham (2nd floor)

10:30am

FR10.30.04 State Level Policies and the Impacts on Housing and Neighborhoods
Moderator: Megan Hatch, Cleveland State University

State Rescaling and the Urban Homestead
Joshua Akers, University of Michigan-Dearborn

Tenant Protection in a Red State and Not a Blue One: The Role of Political Context in Landlord-Tenant Policy Adoption
Megan Hatch, Cleveland State University

At the Tipping Point: Identifying Neighborhoods for Land Bank Action
William Steele, University of Dayton; Joshua Ambrosius, University of Dayton; Tony Kroeger, City of Dayton

Fair Housing, Sustainable Housing?
Justin Steil, New York University, Furman Center for Real Estate and Urban Policy; Ingrid Gould Ellen, New York University, Furman Center for Real Estate and Urban Policy

Presenters
JA

Joshua Akers

University of Michigan-Dearborn
avatar for Megan Hatch

Megan Hatch

Cleveland State University
WS

William Steele

University of Dayton
JS

Justin Steil

New York University, Furman Center for Real Estate and Urban Policy

Moderators
avatar for Megan Hatch

Megan Hatch

Cleveland State University

Friday April 10, 2015 10:30am - 11:55am
Windsor (2nd floor)

10:30am

FR10.30.05 Ferguson, Metropolitan Fragmentation and Ontologies of Segregation
Generally, big cities demand the attention of urban affairs scholars. But for one month and counting, a small city has demanded it -- Ferguson, Missouri. A notable aspect of Ferguson, beyond its racial composition, civil unrest, and militarized police response is its “suburban” location. To what degree is it a potent symbol of the negative consequences of metropolitan fragmentation and socioeconomic regions restructure and reinforce their complex web of disadvantages, inequalities, and injustices? This panel invites scholars of cities, suburban, and regional scholars to consider what Ferguson and satellite cities like it represent in the light of research suggesting new racial geographies and ontologies of segregation, the suburbanization of poverty and fiscal crisis, post-foreclosure real estate markets and current housing policy, regional and subregional governances and the (sub)urbanization of social movements, etc.


The Right to Suburbia: Redevelopment and Resistance on the Urban Edge
Willow S. Lung-Amam, University of Maryland College Park

Is Gentrification the New Racially Restrictive Covenant?
Stacey Sutton, Columbia University

Visceral and Spatial Implications of Violence for Mexican Women in Satellite Cities
Elizabeth Sweet, Temple University

Presenters
WL

Willow Lung-Amam

University of Maryland, College Park
SS

Stacey Sutton

Asst. Professor, Columbia University
avatar for Elizabeth Sweet

Elizabeth Sweet

Geography and Urban Studies, Temple University

Moderators
avatar for Elizabeth Sweet

Elizabeth Sweet

Geography and Urban Studies, Temple University

Friday April 10, 2015 10:30am - 11:55am
Raphael (2nd floor)

10:30am

FR10.30.06 Spatial Inequality and Segregation
Moderator: Seth B Payton, Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis

The Dynamics Between the Affordable Housing and Socio-Demographic Segregation--A Case Study of San Francisco
Xiang Cai, The University of Texas at Dallas

Trust in the Bayou City: The Effects of Racial Discrimination and Segregation on Generalized Trust
Kiara Douds, Kinder Institute for Urban Research at Rice University; Jie Wu, Kinder Institute for Urban Research at Rice University

Urban Community Silos: The Social Capital of Low-Income Residents and Implications for Workforce Development
Cheryl Hyde, Temple University; Karin Eyrich-Garg, Temple University

Intra- and Inter-Neighborhood Income Inequality and Crime
Thomas D. Stucky, Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis; Seth B Payton, Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis; John R Ottensmann, Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis

Presenters
avatar for Xiang Cai

Xiang Cai

Ph.D student, The University of Texas at Dallas
avatar for Kiara Douds

Kiara Douds

Post-Baccalaureate Fellow, Kinder Institute for Urban Research
CH

Cheryl Hyde

Associate Professor/MSW Program Director, Temple University, School of Social Work
SP

Seth Payton

Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis

Moderators
SP

Seth Payton

Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis

Friday April 10, 2015 10:30am - 11:55am
Escorial (2nd floor)

10:30am

FR10.30.08 Employment, Education, and Immigrant Settlement
Moderator: Stuart Andreason, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta

Knowledge Cities, Knowledge Suburbs
Stuart Andreason, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta

Exploring an Informal Labor Niche in a Global City: Mexican Immigrants and Economic Models in Los Angeles’ Informal Economy
Alvaro Huerta, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona

SELF-EMPLOYMENT OF CHINESE IMMIGRANTS IN ETHNIC ENCLAVES:
Shikun Sun, Rutgers-Camden University

Should I stay, or should I go?: Forces that drive youth to reside in rural or urban areas in Brazil and Colombia.
Sonia Uribe, Université Sorbonne Nouvelle - Paris 3, France; Xavier Amat Montesinos, Universidad de Alicante, España

Presenters
SA

Stuart Andreason

Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta
avatar for Alvaro Huerta

Alvaro Huerta

Assistant Professor, Urban & Regional Planning and Ethnic & Women's Studies, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona
Dr. Alvaro Huerta holds a joint faculty appointment in Urban & Region Planning and Ethnic & Women’s Studies. As an interdisciplinary scholar, Dr. Huerta teaches and conducts research on the intersecting domains of community & economic development, Chicana/o & Latina/o studies, immigration & Mexican diaspora, social movements, social networks and the informal economy. Apart from his journal articles, social commentaries and edited volumes, he is... Read More →
SS

Shikun Sun

Rutgers-Camden University
avatar for Sonia Uribe

Sonia Uribe

Researcher, Université Sorbonne Nouvelle - Paris 3, France.

Moderators
SA

Stuart Andreason

Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta

Friday April 10, 2015 10:30am - 11:55am
Star Isle (lobby level)

10:30am

FR10.30.09 Historical Perspectives on Urban (Re)development
Moderator: Robert Heuton, Wayne State University and University of Windsor

Urban Visions for Rural Places: Documenting the Influence of the Housing and Home Finance Agency in Kentucky and Puerto Rico, 1949-1965
Douglas Appler, University of Kentucky

Race, Credit and Suburban Expansion in Old New Orleans
Vern Baxter, University of New Orleans

Metropolitan Planning and the Rebellion of Municipal Incorporations in Dade County
Hector Burga, San Francisco State University

Walkerville: The Re-Branding of a Garden City
Robert Heuton, Wayne State University and University of Windsor

Presenters
DA

Douglas Appler

University of Kentucky
VB

Vern Baxter

University of New Orleans
HB

Hector Burga

San Francisco State University
avatar for Robert Heuton

Robert Heuton

Wayne State University and University of Windsor

Moderators
avatar for Robert Heuton

Robert Heuton

Wayne State University and University of Windsor

Friday April 10, 2015 10:30am - 11:55am
Palm Isle (lobby level)

10:30am

FR10.30.10 Art and Culture in Community and Economic Development
Moderator: Erualdo R. González, California State University, Fullerton

Develop Arts. Develop Community: Black Miami and Little Broadway
Karen Fuller, Florida International University

Creative Toronto: Harnessing the Economic Development Power of Arts & Culture
Shoshanah Goldberg-Miller, Assistant Professor, The Ohio State University

The Changing Politics of Latino Consumer Spaces: Revitalization Trends in Downtown Santa Ana
Erualdo R. González, California State University, Fullerton; Johana Londoño

Presenters
KF

Karen Fuller

Florida International University
avatar for Shoshanah Goldberg-Miller

Shoshanah Goldberg-Miller

Assistant Professor, The Ohio State University
Shoshanah B. D. Goldberg-Miller, (PhD, Public and Urban Policy, The New School; MBA, Arts Management, SUNY Binghamton; BFA, Ceramics, University of Michigan) is Assistant Professor specializing in arts administration and policy in the Department of Arts Administration, Education and Policy at The Ohio State University. Dr. Goldberg-Miller’s research focuses on: arts & cultural entrepreneurship; creative economic development; national and... Read More →
avatar for Erualdo Gonzalez

Erualdo Gonzalez

California State University, Fullerton

Moderators
avatar for Erualdo Gonzalez

Erualdo Gonzalez

California State University, Fullerton

Friday April 10, 2015 10:30am - 11:55am
Gusman (lobby level)

10:30am

FR10.30.12 Media and place-making strategies: Lessons for cities
Moderator: Moses Shumow, Florida International University

Risk Communication in Urban Emergency Management via Social Media: A Case of the City of San Francisco
Kyujin Jung, University of North Texas

Mobilizing the Red Circle: Urban Politics, Public Opinion and Agenda Formation in Practices of Inter-City Policy Learning
Sergio Montero, University of California, Berkeley

Urban Policy, Press & Place: ‘City-making’ in Florida’s Miami-Dade County
Moses Shumow, Florida International University; Robert E. Gutsche, Jr., Florida International University

Buying Reality: Political Ads, Money & Local TV
Danilo Yanich, University of Delaware

Presenters
KJ

Kyujin Jung

University of North Texas
SM

Sergio Montero

University of California, Berkeley
MS

Moses Shumow

Florida International University
avatar for Danilo Yanich

Danilo Yanich

Director, MA program in Urban Affairs & Public Policy, University of Delaware

Moderators
MS

Moses Shumow

Florida International University

Friday April 10, 2015 10:30am - 11:55am
Crandon (lobby level)

10:30am

FR10.30.13 New directions in urban sustainability debates
Moderator: Lars Engberg, Danish Building Research Institute, Aalborg University Copenhagen

Smart city discourse as place-making boundary experience in Aalborg East
Lars Engberg, Danish Building Research Institute, Aalborg University Copenhagen

Urban Transformation and Sustainable Development in the Arabian Gulf Countries
Shaibu Bala Garba, Qatar University

Implementation of Low Carbon urban development in Malaysia
Chin Siong HO, UNiversiti Teknologi Malaysia

Presenters
LA

Lars A. Engberg

Aalborg University Copenhagen
avatar for Shaibu Bala Garba

Shaibu Bala Garba

Assistant Professor, Qatar University
I am principally an architecture but am also a certified planner and urban designer. I work with Qatar University, where I teach mainly in the graduate program. I teach mainly planning courses, including Land Use, Planning Theory, Research and Statistics and GIS. I am mainly engaged in research on Urban Studies, with focus on Urban management, Housing , Environment and Behavior issues
CS

Chin Siong HO

University of Technology Malaysia

Moderators
LA

Lars A. Engberg

Aalborg University Copenhagen

Friday April 10, 2015 10:30am - 11:55am
Godfrey (lobby level)

10:30am

FR10.30.14 (Re) Constructing CIties: Global-Local Dynamics
Moderator: Peter Burns, Loyola University New Orleans

Institutions and the Impact of Natural Disasters: Evidence from Agricultural Trade Flows in Central America and the Caribbean from 1996 to 2011
Sisi Meng, Florida International Univerisity; Pallab Mozumder, Florida International University

“Lebanon post-war reconstruction as a model for the future of Syria?”
Nabil Nazha, University of Illinois at Chicago

Challenges of Urban Disaster Risk Reduction in Informal Settlements
Juan-Pablo Sarmiento, Florida International University; Gabriela Hoberman, Florida International University; Dimmy Herard, Florida International University

Presenters
avatar for Nabil Nazha

Nabil Nazha

Phd Candidate & Teaching Assistant, University of Illinois at Chicago
JS

Juan-Pablo Sarmiento

Florida International University

Moderators
avatar for Peter Burns

Peter Burns

Loyola University New Orleans
Anyone have good pictures from UConn basketball games?

Friday April 10, 2015 10:30am - 11:55am
Tuttle (lobby level)

10:30am

FR10.30.18 Towards Health Equity: Understanding Approaches and Challenges
Moderator: Stacy Moak, University of Arkansas at Little Rock

10-year assessment of predictive relationships between different dimensions of urban environments and incident cardiometabolic risk in South Australia
Mark Daniel, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute; Theo Niyonsenga, University of South Australia; Neil Coffee, University of South Australia; Natasha Howard, University of South Australia; Catherine Paquet, University of South Australia; Anne Taylor, University of Adelaide

Regional and Urban Health under Health Care Reform: Estimating the Effects of the Affordable Care Act on Health Equity
Michele Deegan, Muhlenberg College; Sabrina Terrizzi, Moravian College; A. Lanethea Mathews-Schultz, Muhlenberg College

Exploring the Correlations between Health and Community Socioeconomic Status in Chicago
Susan Longworth, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, Community Development and Policy Studies

The Associations between Neighborhood Constructs, Physical Activity, and Child Obesity: Understanding Race & Income Disparities
Kelechi Uzochukwu, Georgia State University and Georgia Institute of Technology

Measuring spatial healthcare disparity and its association with non-spatial SES determinants
Sulhee Yoon University of Florida, M. Ali; Komeily University of Florida

Presenters
avatar for Mark Daniel

Mark Daniel

Head: School of Population Health, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute
At the University of South Australia, Mark Daniel is Head: School of Population Health, Research Chair of Spatial Epidemiology and Director: Spatial Epidemiology & Evaluation Research Group, a recognised research concentration within the Sansom Institute for Health Research. He is concurrently appointed Principal Research Fellow, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute and Professorial Fellow, Department of Medicine, St... Read More →
MD

Michele Deegan

Muhlenberg College
SL

Susan Longworth

Senior Business Economist, Community Development and Policy Studies, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago
avatar for Kelechi Uzochukwu

Kelechi Uzochukwu

Adjunct Professor, Georgia State University and Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta
Community development, public participation in local governance, low-income and minority populations
avatar for Sulhee (Sunny) Yoon

Sulhee (Sunny) Yoon

Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Urban and Regional Planning at University of Florida
Sulhee (Sunny) is a doctoral candidate at the Department of Urban and Regional Planning at University of Florida. She also pursues her doctoral minor degree in Health Service Research. Her research applies spatial statistics and GIS to integrate built environment and public health that enables to actively contribute to the vision healthy built environment. Her recent research includes an access to primary health care providers.

Moderators
SM

Stacy Moak

University of Arkansas at Little Rock

Friday April 10, 2015 10:30am - 11:55am
Cambridge (2nd floor)

10:30am

FR10.30.19 Multidisciplinary Approaches to Promoting Healthy Communities
Moderator: Kimberly Libman, The New York Academy of Medicine

Developing an agenda with multi-sector support for transforming health and health care in Atlanta
Jane Branscomb, Georgia State University; Kristi Fuller; Karen Minyard

Fostering Health-Based Collaborations: Institutional Forces Shaping Data Sharing Practices Between Transportation and Public Health Professionals
Colleen Casey, University of Texas at Arlington; Jianling Li, University of Texas at Arlington; Michelle Berry, City of Rowlett

The HEAL Clinic: Collaboration among medical, legal and social work service providers
Laurie Cohen, Rutgers, The State University; Jeff Backstrand, Rutgers, The State University; Jennifer Valverde, Rutgers, The State University, Graduate Schools of Law and Social Work

Hospital Investments in Community Development: New York State and the Affordabale Care Act
Kimberly Libman, The New York Academy of Medicine

Presenters
avatar for Jane Branscomb

Jane Branscomb

Senior Research Associate, Georgia Health Policy Center, Georgia State Univ
Systems thinking and use of system dynamics models | Interconnections among justice, well-being, environment, economy | Sexual, reproductive and gender justice | Appropriate use of diverse forms of evidence in policy-making
avatar for Colleen Casey

Colleen Casey

Associate Professor, University of Texas- Arlington
Dr. Casey received a Ph.D. in Public Policy Analysis with an emphasis in Urban and Community Development from Saint Louis University. In addition to UTA, Dr. Casey has taught at Saint Louis University and the University of Connecticut. She began teaching at UTA in August 2008. Her research has been published in journals, including the Journal of Planning Education and Research and Critical Sociology, as well as in edited books published by the... Read More →
LC

Laurie Cohen

Rutgers University, School of Public Affairs and Administration
KL

Kimberly Libman

The New York Academy of Medicine

Moderators
KL

Kimberly Libman

The New York Academy of Medicine

Friday April 10, 2015 10:30am - 11:55am
Michelangelo (2nd floor)

12:00pm

1:45pm

FR1.45.03 Public School Closures, Educational Equity and Metropolitan Change
In the past year, over 1,000 public schools were closed across the nation. This session will focus on public school closures as a strategy of education reform in large urban districts. Speakers will draw on their own past and ongoing empirical research on school closures in Philadelphia, PA, Newark, NJ, and Chicago, IL and on the emergent scholarship studying cases across the country and in Canada. This research deploys a diversity of methodological approaches, including geo-spatial analysis, quantitative analysis, in-depth interviews, ethnography, and participatory-action research. The range of approaches enables a richer understanding of the many ways school closures affect communities and cities. Speakers will initiate and facilitate discussion on tensions in closure decision-making processes, the ways these processes shape concepts of citizenship, and impacts on surrounding neighborhoods and city-wide patterns of inequality.

Presenters
AJ

Amy J. Bach

University of Texas at El Paso
AH

Ariel H. Bierbaum

University of California, Berkeley
SN

Sally Nuamah

Northwestern University
FG

Fithawee G. Tzeggai

University of California, Berkeley

Moderators
AH

Ariel H. Bierbaum

University of California, Berkeley

Friday April 10, 2015 1:45pm - 3:10pm
Star Isle (lobby level)

1:45pm

FR1.45.07 Justice and Healing in Urban Education Demand an Attention to Story-telling.
Racist structures and practices in American schools are both ancient and unrelenting. How do we expose what happens when issues of racism are marginalized or ignored in education? What are some first steps in raising those issues with educators so that they are moved to deeper critical reflection? How do we encourage active resistance to the perpetuation of racism in education? How do we explore the issue as an obstruction to building a real national and international democracy? One professor and three graduate students will discuss the practice of story-telling about racism, the epiphanies they experienced as a result of engaging in this discourse, and implications for classroom practice in urban cities. They will facilitate small group activities to engage the audience in this discussion. Objectives of the session: 1. To explore the dynamic and discoveries of intentional conversations among those who have experienced overt and/or covert racism in schools and universities both locally and globally. 2. To discuss schisms that often occur between African Americans and Black Caribbeans in some U.S. urban universities and in Caribbean countries 3. To begin a dialogue with the audience, first, about their own experience of lived or observed racism and, second, about the need to intentionally address racism in educational and community institutions. Our work draws on the wisdom of scholars/educators like bell hooks, Lisa Delpit, Asa G. Hilliard, III, Bob Moses, Charles Payne, Theresa Perry, and Joan Wynne. The practice this presentation will demonstrate can add to the body of literature about the power of story as a pedagogy for the democratic educator. Its research theory is based upon the goal of qualitative researchers to provide ways of understanding experience from the perspective of those who live it (Schwandt 1994).

Presenters
avatar for Laura Lubin

Laura Lubin

Doctoral Student, Instructional Designer II, Florida International University
Talk to me about Universal Design of instruction and learning in online higher education, accessibility in online education, and any topic that involves reducing barriers to and in education.
avatar for Chaundra L Whitehead

Chaundra L Whitehead

Research Assistant, Florida International University
avatar for Joan Wynne

Joan Wynne

Visiting Associate Professor, The Algebra Project
I'm passionate about teaching, children, my Sun-Daughter, husband, Mama2 daughters, family, friends and our small planet earth. I'm also committed to ridding schools of racism, sexism, classism, and homophobia. I love writing and research and I'm passionate about the work of the Algebra Project, the Young People's Project, and the Dream Defenders.

Moderators
MA

Myrna Augustin

Miami Dade County Public School System

Friday April 10, 2015 1:45pm - 3:10pm
Raphael (2nd floor)

1:45pm

1:45pm

FR1.45.20 Publishing in the Journal of Urban Affairs
This colloquy is organized by the editors of the Journal of Urban Affairs. Panelists will discuss "how to" and "what not to do" to publish successfully in the JUA along with particular topics and methods of interest. The panel will also discuss the role of reviewers and how to be a good reviewer.

Presenters
LR

Laura Reese

Michigan State University
IV

Igor Vojnovic

Michigan State University

Moderators
LR

Laura Reese

Michigan State University

Friday April 10, 2015 1:45pm - 3:10pm
Trinity (2nd floor)

1:45pm

FR1.45.19 Addressing Social Determinants of Health through Mobile Health Centers: The FIU Approach
Social determinants of health (SDH) significantly impact the health of urban populations. Addressing key determinants, including income, physical environment, social support networks, and access to health services have been demonstrated to improve health outcomes. In addition, mobile health approaches have been shown to provide a highly effective and flexible means to provide care to underserved populations. Utilizing an interdisciplinary approach involving colleges of Medicine, Social Work, Law, Nursing, and Education, Florida International University (FIU) created a novel home visit educational program in Miami-Dade County called Green Family Foundation NeighborhoodHELP™. In order to more effectively overcome barriers to health care identified in the target communities through this program, FIU launched a Mobile Health Center program to directly provide care to the underserved and positively impact SDH. This colloquy session will provide insight into the FIU approach by describing the background of the FIU Mobile Health Center, challenges encountered, and future directions to reduce health disparities. Specific topics will include how an academic Mobile Health Center was created to address SDH through a learner-model, challenges to providing services for underserved communities, coordinating care without a fixed site, and expanding services to new areas to address specific cancer disparities.

Presenters
FA

Frederick Anderson

Florida International University
JC

Josya-Gony Charles

Florida International University
CG

Charles Gonzalez

Florida International University
KI

Kumar Ilangovan

Florida International University
LN

Lorraine Nowakowski

Florida International University

Moderators
KI

Kumar Ilangovan

Florida International University

Friday April 10, 2015 1:45pm - 3:10pm
Oxford (2nd floor)

1:45pm

FR1.45.01 Housing the Senior Surge: Emerging Issues as the Boomers Pass 60
The number of people in the US aged 60 and older is projected to grow considerably between now and 2030. As the population ages, demand for housing and services and shifts in behaviors among the middle-aged and elderly will affect our nation in a variety of ways, many of which are only now coming into focus. As the emerging shifts become clearer, we are able to discern differences in regional population changes, characteristics of housing that can best meet a range of home and locational needs, and transportation activities. This panel brings together experts to discuss their research on changes and challenges related to population shifts, housing needs, and mobility practices. The panel will begin with a presentation of population growth scenarios that highlight the ways in which demographic changes likely will be uneven across the country and how changes could affect housing markets and other sectors differentially. Findings from a major study of housing, health and mobility needs of older adults leads to policy and practice implications for supporting the well-being of older citizens. The increase in the elderly population will bring growth in the number of people with a disability. Two papers present findings from a national study of housing discrimination against people who are deaf and people who use wheelchairs. The panel will conclude with a consideration of the interplay of health and transportation behaviors among the elderly and how behaviors differ by gender and income.


The Senior Surge: How the Baby Boomers' Aging Will Transform U.S. Regions
Rolf Pendall, Urban Institute

Housing America's Older Adults: Preparing for an Aging Population
Jennifer Molinsky, Joint Center for Housing Studies

Housing Discrimination Against People Who Are Deaf or Extremely Hard of Hearing
Margery Turner, Urban Institute; Robert Santos, Urban Institute; Diane Levy, Urban Institute; Doug Wissoker, Urban Institute; Claudia Aranda, Urban Institute; Robert Pitintolo, Urban Institute

Discrimination in the Rental Housing Market against People Who Use Wheelchairs: National Study Findings
Margery Turner, Urban Institute; Robert Santos, Urban Institute; Diane Levy, Urban Institute; Doug Wissoker, Urban Institute; Claudia Aranda, Urban Institute; Robert Pitingolo, Urban Institute

Understanding older drivers: An examination of medical conditions, medication use, and travel behavior
Sandra Rosenbloom, University of Texas at Austin; Robert Santos, Urban Institute; Tim Tripplet, Urban Institute

Presenters
CA

Claudia Aranda

Urban Institute
JM

Jennifer Molinsky

Joint Center for Housing Studies
avatar for Rolf Pendall

Rolf Pendall

Dir., Metro Housing & Communities Ctr, Urban Institute
Population, housing, and land use: Future scenarios and implications for mobility in cities, regions, and the nation
avatar for Robert Pitingolo

Robert Pitingolo

Research Associate, Urban Institute
SR

Sandra Rosenbloom

University of Texas at Austin

Moderators
DL

Diane Levy

Urban Institute

Friday April 10, 2015 1:45pm - 3:10pm
Balmoral (2nd floor)

1:45pm

FR1.45.02 Housing, Transportation, and Socio-economic Neighborhood Status
Moderator: TBA

The Neighborhood Looking-Glass: Non-poor Hispanics' Neighborhood Perceptions (of Disorder) in a Houston Barrio
Elizabeth Korver-Glenn, Rice University

The Relationship Between Transportation, Neighborhoods, and Employment among Subsidized Housing Residents in Charlotte, North Carolina
Mai Nguyen, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Michael Webb, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Estefany Noria, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; William Rohe, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Foreign Born Population Concentration and Neighborhood Growth and Development within U.S. Metropolitan Areas
Matt Ruther, University of Louisville; Rebbeca Tesfai, Temple University; Janice Madden, University of Pennsylvania

The relationship between housing and social status from the perspective of media images: A content analysis of contemporary Chinese real estate ads
Abigail Qian ZHOU, Waseda University

Presenters
EK

Elizabeth Korver-Glenn

Rice University
MR

Matt Ruther

University of Louisville
avatar for Abigail Qian ZHOU

Abigail Qian ZHOU

Research Associate, Waseda University
Ph. D. of Information Studies


Friday April 10, 2015 1:45pm - 3:10pm
Alhambra (2nd floor)

1:45pm

FR1.45.04 Issues of Locational Attainment and Mobility
Moderator: Mark Joseph, Case Western Reserve University

The Re-Emergence of the South: Black Locational Attainment in the Post-Civil Rights Era, 1970-2010
D Augustus Anderson, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Neighborhood Trajectories of Low-Income U.S Households:
Kwan Ok Lee, National University of Singapore; Richard Smith, Wayne State University; George Galster, Wayne State University

Fostering Opportunities: How Place, Policy and Race Shape Intergenerational Mobility
Junia Howell, Rice University

Promoting a Geography of Opportunity in Accra: Drawing Lessons from the Poverty Deconcentration Experience in the US
Mark Joseph, Case Western Reserve University; George Owusu, University of Ghana; Isaac Arthur, University of Ghana

Should we Apprec8?: Understanding the impacts of Section 8 Vouchers on Neighborhood Housing Indicators in Louisville, KY
Wesley Meares, Georgia Regents University; John Gilderbloom, University of Louisville

Presenters
DA

D Augustus Anderson

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
avatar for George Galster

George Galster

Hillberry Professor of Urban Affairs, Wayne State University
justice, beauty and the world
JH

Junia Howell

Rice University
MJ

Mark Joseph

Case Western Reserve University
WM

Wesley Meares

Georgia Regents University

Moderators
MJ

Mark Joseph

Case Western Reserve University

Friday April 10, 2015 1:45pm - 3:10pm
Windsor (2nd floor)

1:45pm

FR1.45.05 Sweat (In)Equity?: Alternative Transportation and Inequality in US Cities
Cycling and walking have long been viewed as transportation modes which encourage healthier, safer and more equitable urban environments. As low-cost transportation modes, cycling and walking are also frequently viewed as a mobility choice facilitating poverty alleviation. While bike-sharing programs, complete streets initiatives, and planning interventions for bicycling and walking in general are on the rise in the United States, the links between these investments and transportation inequality are relatively under-studied. This panel will highlight issues of inequality, access, and equity by responding to the following questions: How do race, class and gender influence perceptions of alternative transportation modes? How can planning practice better appreciate or even leverage differences in how communities view and participate in cycling and walking?


The Suburbanization of Central Cities – Who benefits from safe streets?
Eve Bratman, American University, School of International Service; Aaron Golub, Arizona State University, School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning and School of Sustainability

Nice Ride Neighborhood: How one bike share program attempted to “retrofit equity”
Melody Hoffmann, Anoka Ramsey Community College

Whose walkability? Do standard measures of walkability used by planners account for differences in perceptions and experiences by income level?
Arlie Adkins, University of Arizona; Carrie Makarewicz, University of Colorado Denver, College of Architecture & Planning

The Visibly ‘Invisible’ Cyclist and Cumulative Irresponsibility
Do J. Lee, City University of New York, Environmental Psychology (Doctoral Student, The Graduate Center)

Presenters
AA

Arlie Adkins

University of Arizona
avatar for Eve Bratman

Eve Bratman

Assistant Professor, American University, School of International Service
American University
avatar for Aaron Golub

Aaron Golub

Associate Professor, Arizona State University
MH

Melody Hoffmann

Anoka Ramsey Community College
DJ

Do J. Lee

The Graduate Center at the City University of New York, Environmental Psychology
avatar for Carrie Makarewicz

Carrie Makarewicz

Assistant Professor, University of Colorado Denver
University of Colorado Denver

Moderators
avatar for Aaron Golub

Aaron Golub

Associate Professor, Arizona State University

Friday April 10, 2015 1:45pm - 3:10pm
Tuttle (lobby level)

1:45pm

FR1.45.06 Why Place Matters in Income Inequality
Moderator: Bethany Welch, Aquinas Center

The Implications of Financial Inclusion Programs for Community-Based Development Organizations
Miranda Martinez, Ohio State University; Matt Brenn, Ohio State University

Urban Poverty and Public Transit: Evidence from the Atlanta Metropolitan Area
Rahul Pathak, Georgia State University; Christopher Wyczalkowski, Georgia State University & Georgia Institute of Technology; Xi Huang, Georgia State University & Georgia Institute of Technology

Dynamics of multiple claims in civic spaces: Understanding urban spaces of Mumbai’s railway station hubs
Amruta Sakalker, M.Arch second year student at Penn State University; Alexandra Staub, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Architecture, Penn State University

Working in the Shadow of the State: Economic Strategies of Undocumented Immigrants in Texas
Jennifer Scott, The University of Texas at Austin

The Characteristics of Transit Rich Neighborhoods and their Impact on Transit Ridership in the Atlanta Region
Kyungsoon Wang, Georgia Institute of Technology; Karen Leone de Nie, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta; Myungje Woo, University of Seoul

Presenters
MM

Miranda Martinez

Associate Professor, Ohio State University
RP

Rahul Pathak

Georgia State University
avatar for Amruta Sakalker

Amruta Sakalker

Graduate Teaching Assistant at Penn State, Pennsylvania State University
Amruta Sakalker is a second year Masters of Architecture student at Pennsylvania State University. Her research interests are urban theory, urban sociology and South Asian planning theories. Her master’s thesis focuses on transient use of urban spaces and currently her research is based in Mumbai. She received the University Graduate Fellowship for the Master’s program at Penn State for 2013-14. Before pursuing her masters, she was working... Read More →
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Jennifer Scott

The University of Texas at Austin
KW

Kyungsoon Wang

Georgia Institute of Technology

Moderators
avatar for Bethany Welch

Bethany Welch

Director, Aquinas Center
Dr. Bethany Welch is the founding director of Aquinas Center in Philadelphia as well as a nonprofit management and evaluation consultant. The center is housed in a former convent re-purposed as a space to foster mutual support and shared understanding on the grounds of a diverse, inner city Catholic parish. Parishioners and guests come together to practice hospitality, promote education, and engage in service. The project is a direct result of... Read More →

Friday April 10, 2015 1:45pm - 3:10pm
Hibiscus (lobby level)

1:45pm

FR1.45.08 Immigration, Race and Diversity
Moderator: Richard Smith, Wayne State University

Toward a theory of local immigration policy: Baltimore City and the Hispanic diaspora
Felipe Filomeno, University of Maryland Baltimore County

Welcoming Cities: Immigration Policies at the Local Government Level
Xi Huang, Georgia State University and The Georgia Institute of Technology; Cathy Liu, Georgia State University

Outside the Perimeter: Immigrant Alliances and Uneven Growth in Metro Atlanta
Anna Kim, Georgia Institute of Technology

America's Colorful Color Line
J.S. Onésimo Sandoval, Saint Louis University

Does Spatial Assimilation Lead to Reproduction of Gentrification in the Global City?
Richard Smith, Wayne State University; Thomas Pride, Wayne State University; Catherine Schmitt-Sands, Wayne State University

Presenters
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Felipe Filomeno

Assistant Professor, University of Maryland Baltimore County
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Xi Huang

Georgia State University & Georgia Institute of Technology
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Anna Kim

Georgia Institute of Technology
avatar for J.S. Onésimo Sandoval

J.S. Onésimo Sandoval

Associate Professor and Co-Director of the Public and Social Policy Ph.D. Program, Saint Louis University
avatar for Richard Smith

Richard Smith

Assistant Professor, Wayne State University

Moderators
avatar for Richard Smith

Richard Smith

Assistant Professor, Wayne State University

Friday April 10, 2015 1:45pm - 3:10pm
Escorial (2nd floor)

1:45pm

FR1.45.09 The Politics of Space: Identity, Memory and Planning
Moderator: Claire Poitras, INRS

Vizcaya Museum and Gardens: Collaboration of an Institution and the Public
Juan Antonio Bueno, Florida International University; Ian Simpkins, Vizcaya Museum and Gardens

Tactical Urbanism, Collective Identity and The Historic Tennessee Brewery
Heather Jamerson, Rhodes College

From the Hills to the Flatlands: Freeways, Cars and 20th Century Urban Power in Oakland, CA
Dorie Perez, University of California at Merced

Presenters
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Juan Antonio Bueno

Florida International University
HJ

Heather Jamerson

Rhodes College
DP

Dorie Perez

University of California at Merced
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Ian Simpkins

Vizcaya Museum and Gardens

Moderators
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Claire Poitras

Institut national de la recherche scientifique - Urbanisation Culture Société

Friday April 10, 2015 1:45pm - 3:10pm
Godfrey (lobby level)

1:45pm

FR1.45.10 The Role of Social Media in the Rise of New Forms of Urban Citizenship
Moderator: Nina Kasniunas, Goucher College

The New Urban Citizen #slacktivistnomore
Nina Kasniunas, Goucher College

Social Media Use in Enhancing Community Resilience during the 2013 Seoul Flood: Dimensional Approach to Information and Communication Technology
Kyungwoo Kim, University of North Texas; Kyujin Jung, University of North Texas

Self-organized Governance Networks on Social Media: Exploring Continuum of Care Homeless Networks in Dallas-Fort Worth
Jesus Valero, University of North Texas; Kyujin Jung, University of North Texas

Presenters
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Nina Kasniunas

Goucher College
Goucher College
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Kyungwoo Kim

University of North Texas
JV

Jesus Valero

University of North Texas

Moderators
NK

Nina Kasniunas

Goucher College
Goucher College

Friday April 10, 2015 1:45pm - 3:10pm
Palm Isle (lobby level)

1:45pm

FR1.45.11 Environmental Justice: Assessing the Role of Communities, the State and Corporations
Moderator: Yasminah Beebeejaun, University College London

Geology, guesswork and the coproduction of knowledge
Yasminah Beebeejaun, University College London

A Participatory GIS Approach in Environmental Justice Studies: The Case of West Dallas
Sima Namin, University of Texas at Arlington

Retrofitting Richmond: Chevron's Community Economic Identity
Mia Renauld, Northeastern University

Presenters
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Yasminah Beebeejaun

Lecturer, University College London
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Sima Namin

University of Texas at Arlington
Ph.D. Student at the University of Texas at Arlington
MR

Mia Renauld

Ph.D. Candidate, Northeastern University

Moderators
YB

Yasminah Beebeejaun

Lecturer, University College London

Friday April 10, 2015 1:45pm - 3:10pm
Gusman (lobby level)

1:45pm

FR1.45.12 Who Makes Detroit? Determinants of Place-Making in the Shrinking City
This panel will address place-making efforts in the city of Detroit, where investors seek to exploit global trade investment opportunities, a city-wide effort plans for 'Detroit Future City,' and private developers and philanthropies steer investments to central business district rebuilding and use strategic investments to support well-placed neighborhoods. The panel brings together scholars who are exploring the impacts of real-estate and foundation strategic investments, the shrinking role of local government, the role of the media in place-making and community based strategic planning and other autonomous neighborhood initiatives. The panel asks, what determines how Detroit is ‘remade’ when the mediating role of local government is diminished? As global private and philanthropic investors focus efforts on 'place-making' strategies, marginalized urban neighborhoods are often left to employ 'do-it-yourself-planning.' The panel also explores the constraints on and openings for urban communities as they assert their own local visions. The panel asks: How do communities plan for their own needs and desired future direction? How do they resist more resourced efforts that negatively impact their own self-determined efforts? Does 'do-it-yourself planning' result from a scarcity of external support for community initiatives or a desire to resist 'place-making' plans launched by external actors? Community responses have included negotiating community benefit agreements, launching community-based strategic planning, and other autonomous community planning projects. The panel assesses possible determinants of the emergence of self-determination efforts and asks under which circumstances they are most impactful.


The Structural Origins of Territorial Stigma: Racial Politics and Detroit’s Regional Water System (1950s-2010s)
Dana Kornberg, University of Michigan

Between Scylla and Charybdis: Navigating Foundation Impact to Attain Community Self-Determination in Detroit Future City
Janice Bockmeyer, City University of New York - John Jay College

Place-Making from Below: The Politics of Community Benefits Agreements and Equitable Redevelopment in Detroit
Amy Krings, University of Michigan

Community-Based Organizations as De Facto City Planning Offices
Margaret Dewar, University of Michigan

Presenters
avatar for Janice Bockmeyer

Janice Bockmeyer

Associate Professor, City University of New York - John Jay College
MD

Margaret Dewar

University of Michigan
DK

Dana Kornberg

University of Michigan
avatar for Amy Krings

Amy Krings

Doctoral Candidate in Social Work & Political Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Moderators
avatar for Janice Bockmeyer

Janice Bockmeyer

Associate Professor, City University of New York - John Jay College

Friday April 10, 2015 1:45pm - 3:10pm
Michelangelo (2nd floor)

1:45pm

FR1.45.13 Disaster Management & Institutional Support
Moderator: Julia Nevarez, Kean University

Strategies of Political Institutions and Civil Society Actors in the Post-3/11 era: The Case of Japan
Matthew Bradley, Indiana University Kokomo

From Theory to Practice: Confronting Urban Planning Tools to the Reconstruction of Lac-Megantic, Quebec
Yona Jebrak, University of Quebec in Montreal

Financial Resiliency: Can Local Governments Financially Bounce Back Post-Disaster?
Jesseca Short, University of North Texas

Presenters
MB

Matthew Bradley

Indiana University Kokomo
YJ

Yona Jebrak

Professor, University of Quebec in Montreal
JS

Jesseca Short

University of North Texas

Moderators
JN

Julia Nevarez

Kean University

Friday April 10, 2015 1:45pm - 3:10pm
Crandon (lobby level)

1:45pm

FR1.45.16 Dissecting participatory mechanisms and their impact on the citizenry
Moderator: Carissa Slotterback, University of Minnesota

Looking at ways to measure citizen empowerment in Latin American contexts
Arturo Flores, Anahuac University

Participatory Budgeting in Chicago's 49th Ward: Critical Dialectical Tensions of Learning in Democratic Activity
José W. Melendez, Learning Sciences Research Institute, University of Illinois at Chicago

Public Engagement Strategies to Build Capacity in Diverse Communities
Carissa Slotterback, University of Minnesota; Ryan Allen, University of Minnesota

Presenters
AF

Arturo Flores

Anahuac University
avatar for José W. Melendez

José W. Melendez

Doctoral Candidate and Research Assistant, University of Illinois, Chicago
José is a political junkie, a world traveler and a dancer who loves theater and the arts. His talents and background give him unique perspective on urban planning, and have influenced his field of study: learning in community development. At the University of Illinois, Chicago, José is studying the participatory budgeting process in Chicago's 49th ward. His active research agenda focuses on the interrelation between how the environment... Read More →
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Carissa Slotterback

University of Minnesota

Moderators
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Carissa Slotterback

University of Minnesota

Friday April 10, 2015 1:45pm - 3:10pm
Dupont (lobby level)

1:45pm

FR1.45.17 Improving Public Safety: Community Control vs. Security
Moderator: Pierre Hamel, Université de Montréal

Unreasonable Suspicion: Youth and Policing in New York City
Christine Barrow, Molloy College

Methods to Match Communities for Public Safety Planning: Lessons from Applied Work in Suburban Delaware
Troy Mix, University of Delaware; Claudia Caruso, University of Delaware

Neighborhood Safety Interventions: Treating Symptoms or Transforming Community?
Caché Owens, University of North Carolina at Charlotte; Dr. Janni Sorensen, University of North Carolina at Charlotte; Joe Howarth, University of North Carolina at Charlotte; Angel Hjarding, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Presenters
avatar for Christine Barrow

Christine Barrow

Assistant Professor, Molloy College
I am an Assistant Professor in the Department of Criminal Justice at Molloy College. I earned a PhD in criminal justice from Rutgers University School of Criminal Justice.
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Claudia Caruso

PhD Student, University of Delaware, School of Public Policy & Administration
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Caché Owens

University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Moderators
PH

Pierre Hamel

Université de Montréal

Friday April 10, 2015 1:45pm - 3:10pm
Flagler (lobby level)

1:45pm

FR1.45.18 Understanding the twin epidemics of substance abuse and HIV/AIDS affecting Latino communities throughout Miami-Dade County, Florida
This session presented by the Center for Research on U.S. Latino HIV/AIDS and Drug Abuse (CRUSADA) at Florida International University will address the escalating twin epidemics of substance abuse and HIV/AIDS affecting Latino communities throughout Miami-Dade County, Florida. This presentation is an expression of our efforts to ensure the long term sustainability and expansion of the Center and its community partners in their pursuit towards reducing and/or eliminating HIV/AIDS and substance abuse health disparities in Latino populations and Latino women in Miami-Dade County, FL, in particular as represented in the general focus of our selected papers. Of particular importance will be the insights drawn from our multidisciplinary and community based research that has advance our understanding of the underlying individual, family, and community factors that influence the spread of HIV/AIDS and substance abuse among Latinos. Presenters will explore the HIV/AIDS needs of a south Florida Latino community as well as the Latino pre-to-post immigration risk behavior trajectories. Speakers will reflect on recruitment and assessment of young adult Latina women who recently immigrated to the United States. Furthermore, the visions of a social networks program to reduce HIV among Latina migrant workers will be discussed. Through this panel, we will demonstrate the relevance for developing efforts of collaboration within the Miami-Dade County with community-based organizations as well as enhance the much-needed evidence-based public health research focusing on these vulnerable populations.


Exploring HIV/AIDS Needs Of A South Florida Latino Community
Patria Rojas, Florida International University; Catalina Lopez-Quintero, Florida International University; James Melton, Florida International University; Francisco Sastre, Florida International University; Mario De La Rosa, Florida International University

Latino Pre- To Post-Immigration Risk Behavior Trajectories
Mariana Sanchez, Florida International University; Francisco Sastre, Florida International University; Mario De La Rosa, Florida International University

Using Social Networks To Reduce Hiv In Latina Migrant Workers
Mariano Kanamori, Florida International University; Maritza Jaramillo, enFAMILIA; James Melton, Florida International University; Alanna Pugliese, Florida International University; Maricarmen Santos, Florida international University; Rosa Babino, Florida International University

Influence of Mother-Daughter Attachment on Substance Use: A Longitudinal Study of a Latina
Mario De La Rosa, Florida International University; Hui Huang, Florida International University; Patria Rojas, Florida International University; Frank Dillon, Florida International University; Catalina Lopez-Quintero, Florida International University; Tan Li, Florida International University

Facilitating the Recruitment and Assessment of Young Adult Latina Women Who Recently Immigrated to the United States
Frank Dillon, Florida International University; Diana Sheehan, Florida International University; Rosa Babino, Florida International University; James Melton, Florida International University; Christine Spadola, Florida International University; Mario De La Rosa, Florida International University

Presenters
FD

Frank Dillon

Florida International University
HH

Hui Huang

Florida International University
MK

Mariano Kanamori

Florida International University
PR

Patria Rojas

Florida International University
MS

Mariana Sanchez

Florida International University

Moderators
MD

Mario De La Rosa

Florida International University

Friday April 10, 2015 1:45pm - 3:10pm
Cambridge (2nd floor)

3:15pm

3:40pm

FR3.40.13 The Role of Public Decision Making in Urban Sustainability
Over the past two decades, local communities around the world have sought new ways to become more sustainable. Increased social and political demand for sustainability in recent years has only served to increase this desire. This session focuses on a notable part of that demand--the public’s decision making process--and its impact on the sustainability of urban systems. Case studies will examine issues of parks, food, water, and disaster management in an attempt to contextualize public decision making in a larger context of sustainability. Cases will be drawn from multiple locations in both the developed and developing worlds, including the Southeastern United States and East Africa. Comparisons will be drawn between the case studies, and speakers will draw conclusions on the impact and significance of public decision making from these comparisons.

Presenters
DB

David Barth

University of Florida
RZ

Ryan Z. Good

University of Florida
KM

Kelly Monaghan

University of Florida
JR

Juan Rodriguez

University of Florida
MS

Marilyn Swisher

University of Florida

Moderators
RZ

Ryan Z. Good

University of Florida

Friday April 10, 2015 3:40pm - 5:05pm
Crandon (lobby level)

3:40pm

FR3.40.16 Building the Just City: The Contributions of Adolph L. Reed, Jr. to our understanding of Race, Class, and Urban Political Economy under Neoliberalism
Participants in this colloquy will review and assess the decades of vital and compelling scholarship and activism of one of the leading figures in the field of urban affairs today. Professor Reed will respond to the comments of the participants, while sketching a vision of a progressive and just future for urban America.

Presenters
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Larry Bennett

DePaul University
CH

Cynthia Horan

Yale University
CJ

Cedric Johnson

University of Illinois at Chicago
AL

Adolph L. Reed

University of Pennsylvania
avatar for Timothy Weaver

Timothy Weaver

University of Louisville

Moderators
DI

David Imbroscio

University of Louisville

Friday April 10, 2015 3:40pm - 5:05pm
Escorial (2nd floor)

3:40pm

FR3.40.19 An Interprofessional Approach to Addressing Challenges of Urban Healthcare: Green Family Foundation Neighborhood Health Education Learning Program
The session will focus on Green Family Foundation NeighborhoodHELP™ (NHELP) an innovative, longitudinal service-learning program at Florida International University (FIU). NHELP emphasizes training 21st century health professional teams to address social determinants of health in order to improve the well-being of underserved communities in Miami, Florida. Panelists will discuss how interprofessional teams of FIU medical, social work, law, nursing, and education students work with assigned households located in racially and ethnically diverse, urban neighborhoods. During household visits, supervised by FIU faculty, students implement a household-centered approach to care by performing assessments and establishing a plan to improve health by identifying and addressing the socioeconomic barriers to care. In addition, households receive support from an FIU community-based team of outreach workers and pediatric and mental health specialists. Speakers will address how this unique educational program, one of the first in the nation, allows students to better understand population health principles and collaborate with each other to improve health outcomes and quality of life. Of particular importance, the session will include real life scenarios that illustrate how students are making a difference in people’s lives, while reducing healthcare costs and positively impacting health in our community.

Presenters
avatar for Sophia Lacroix

Sophia Lacroix

Community Outreach Coordinator, Florida International University
OL

Onelia Lage

Florida International University
LM

Lourdes Martin

Florida International University
MD

Maria De Los Santos

Florida International University
EW

Ebony Whisenant

Florida International University

Moderators
OL

Onelia Lage

Florida International University

Friday April 10, 2015 3:40pm - 5:05pm
Cambridge (2nd floor)

3:40pm

FR3.40.01 The End of “Public” Housing? Policy Frameworks and Implementation on HUD’s 50th Anniversary
Federal housing policies under the Obama Administration espouse the value and necessity of private and third sector actors in the production and preservation of affordable housing. The FY 2010-2015 HUD Strategic Plan included a new mission statement to “create strong, sustainable, inclusive communities and quality, affordable homes for all” with five specific goals intended to guide the both the transformation of HUD as an agency, as well as the revitalization of communities. This plan describes the evolution of HUD from a large, centralized government bureaucracy to a customer-center organization that uses “The New Business Model” of data-driven performance. What do HUD’s past policy implementation processes demonstrate about public-private governance arrangements? How are the inherited HUD policies (such as HOPE VI) faring in particular cities and neighborhoods, and for particular special populations of tenants? And, what do we make of the past five years of HUD’s new policies, such as the Choice Neighborhood Initiative and the Rental Assistance Demonstration program, that require leveraging private actors and funding to maintain and redevelop public and assisted housing stock? This panel weaves HUD policy implementation for particular places and populations with the next iteration of HUD’s policy framework in order to show the continued evolution of policy design and implementation, calling into question the future of public housing.


Temporary Housing and Permanent Homes? Determinants of Spells in Public Housing
Prentiss Dantzler, Department of Public Policy & Administration, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

Housing the Poorest in San Francisco: Resisting Gentrification
Lawrence J. Vale, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,Department of Urban Studies and Planning

Revealing the Wizards Behind the Curtain: Influence of the Feds, Courts, and Mayors in Chicago’s Public Housing Policy Reforms
Amy Khare, University of Chicago

RADical Departure? A First Look at HUD's Rental Assistance Demonstration Program
James Hanlon, Southern Illinois University

Early Successes and Challenges in Choice Neighborhoods
Leah Hendey, Urban Institute; Rolf Pendall, Urban Institute; David Greenberg, MDRC; Kathryn Pettit, Urban Institute; Diane Levy, Urban Institute; Megan Gallagher, Urban Institute; Mark Joseph, Case Western Reserve University

Presenters
PD

Prentiss Dantzler

Fellow / Visiting Assistant Professor, Colorado College
avatar for James Hanlon

James Hanlon

Associate Professor, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
Assistant Professor of Geography. Research interests in urban geography, public and affordable housing, urban policy, and racial segregation and inequality.
avatar for Leah Hendey

Leah Hendey

Senior Research Associate, Urban Institute
avatar for Amy Khare

Amy Khare

Ph.D. Candidate, University of Chicago
Amy Khare’s research seeks to shape solutions to persistent poverty and structural inequality, with a specific focus on affordable housing, community development, and market-driven policies. Her central line of inquiry examines how urban politics influences the privatization of public resources in a restructured U.S. welfare state. She aims to produce scholarship that is guided by and has implications for local activism and policy changes... Read More →
avatar for Lawrence J. Vale

Lawrence J. Vale

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Moderators
avatar for Amy Khare

Amy Khare

Ph.D. Candidate, University of Chicago
Amy Khare’s research seeks to shape solutions to persistent poverty and structural inequality, with a specific focus on affordable housing, community development, and market-driven policies. Her central line of inquiry examines how urban politics influences the privatization of public resources in a restructured U.S. welfare state. She aims to produce scholarship that is guided by and has implications for local activism and policy changes... Read More →

Friday April 10, 2015 3:40pm - 5:05pm
Balmoral (2nd floor)

3:40pm

FR3.40.02 21st Century Issues in Community Development
Moderator: Andrew Zitcer, Drexel University

Principal-Agent problems in Non-Entitlement Community Development Block Grants
Christopher Wyczalkowski, Georgia State University/Georgia Institute of Technology; Sandy Zook, Georgia State University

Impact of Federal Community Development Policy: Evidence from Forty Years of Neighborhood Revitalization Programs in Phoenix, AZ
Yue Zhang, Arizona State University; Aaron Golub, Associate Professor; Nabil Kamel, Assistant Professor

The Role of Cooperatives in Neighborhood Commercial Corridors
Andrew Zitcer, Drexel University; Richardson Dilworth, Drexel University

Presenters
avatar for Christopher Wyczalkowski

Christopher Wyczalkowski

Doctoral Student, Georgia State University/Georgia Institute of Technology
YZ

Yue Zhang

Arizona State University
AZ

Andrew Zitcer

Drexel University

Moderators
AZ

Andrew Zitcer

Drexel University

Friday April 10, 2015 3:40pm - 5:05pm
Gusman (lobby level)

3:40pm

FR3.40.03 Issues of Housing Financing in the 'Post-Recession' Age
Moderator: Dale Thomson, University of Michigan-Dearborn

RAPID REGIME RESPONSES: AN URBAN REGIME ANALYSIS
Antwan Hampton, Northern Illinois University

The U.S. Housing Finance Debate: Implications for Urban Families, Neighborhoods and Cities
Dan Immergluck, Georgia Institute of Technology

Foreclosure Mitigation Counseling in Low-Income Latino Communities: Household Trajectories in Seattle, WA
Maria Y. Rodriguez, University of Washington

Fiscal Crisis and Community Development: The Impacts of the Great Recession on Financial Sustainability of CDCs
Dale Thomson, University of Michigan-Dearborn; Harley Etienne, University of Michigan

Walkable Neighborhood Effects of Foreclosure Spillovers
Jaewoong Won, Texas A&M University; Chanam Lee, Texas A&M University

Presenters
AH

Antwan Hampton

Northern Illinois University
avatar for Dan Immergluck

Dan Immergluck

Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology
MY

Maria Y. Rodriguez

Doctoral Candidate, University of Washington
DT

Dale Thomson

University of Michigan-Dearborn
JW

Jaewoong Won

Texas A&M University

Moderators
DT

Dale Thomson

University of Michigan-Dearborn

Friday April 10, 2015 3:40pm - 5:05pm
Windsor (2nd floor)

3:40pm

FR3.40.04 Impact of the Great Recession on Housing Issues
Moderator: Jaclene Begley, Ryerson University

How do housing markets affect home repair and improvement behavior? Evidence from the 1985-2011 American Housing Survey.
Jaclene Begley, Ryerson University; Tina Park, Brown University; Ingrid Ellen, New York University

Cashing In On Distress: The Expansion of Predatory Financial Institutions during the Great Recession
Jacob Faber, New York University

Mortgage Lending after the Crisis: Patterns of Foreclosure and Lending in Toledo, Ohio
Daniel Hammel, University of Toledo

The Effect of the G